How does it work?: The search for explanatory mechanisms

Philosophy of the Social Sciences 34 (2):182-210 (2004)
This article addresses the following problems: What is a mechanism, how can it be discovered, and what is the role of the knowledge of mechanisms in scientific explanation and technological control? The proposed answers are these. A mechanism is one of the processes in a concrete system that makes it what it is — for example, metabolism in cells, interneuronal connections in brains, work in factories and offices, research in laboratories, and litigation in courts of law. Because mechanisms are largely or totally imperceptible, they must be conjectured. Once hypothesized they help explain, because a deep scientific explanation is an answer to a question of the form, "How does it work, that is, what makes it tick—what are its mechanisms?" Thus, by contrast with the subsumption of particulars under a generalization, an explanation proper consists in unveiling some lawful mechanism, as when political stability is explained by either coercion, public opinion manipulation, or democratic participation. Finding mechanisms satisfies not only the yearning for understanding, but also the need for control. Key Words: explanation • function • mechanism • process • system • systemism.
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DOI 10.1177/0048393103262550
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Federica Russo & Jon Williamson (2007). Interpreting Causality in the Health Sciences. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 21 (2):157 – 170.
Tuukka Kaidesoja (2009). Bhaskar and Bunge on Social Emergence. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 39 (3):300-322.
Andreas Pickel (2005). The Habitus Process: A Biopsychosocial Conception. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 35 (4):437–461.

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