Locke, Shaftesbury, and Hutcheson: Contesting Diversity in the Enlightenment and Beyond

Cambridge University Press (2006)
Are human beings linked by a common nature, one that makes them see the world in the same moral way? Or are they fragmented by different cultural practices and values? These fundamental questions of our existence were debated in the Enlightenment by Locke, Shaftesbury, and Hutcheson. Daniel Carey provides an important new historical perspective on their discussion. At the same time, he explores the relationship between these founding arguments and contemporary disputes over cultural diversity and multiculturalism. Our own conflicting positions today reflect long-standing differences that emerged during the Enlightenment.
Keywords Pluralism  Enlightenment
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Call number BD394.C37 2006
ISBN(s) 0521117461   0521845025   9780521845021
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