The Persistence of Epistemic Objects Through Scientific Change

Erkenntnis 75 (3):413-429 (2011)
Abstract
Why do some epistemic objects persist despite undergoing serious changes, while others go extinct in similar situations? Scientists have often been careless in deciding which epistemic objects to retain and which ones to eliminate; historians and philosophers of science have been on the whole much too unreflective in accepting the scientists’ decisions in this regard. Through a re-examination of the history of oxygen and phlogiston, I will illustrate the benefits to be gained from challenging and disturbing the commonly accepted continuities and discontinuities in the lives of epistemic objects. I will also outline two key consequences of such re-thinking. First, a fresh view on the (dis)continuities in key epistemic objects is apt to lead to informative revisions in recognized periods and trends in the history of science. Second, recognizing sources of continuity leads to a sympathetic view on extinct objects, which in turn problematizes the common monistic tendency in science and philosophy; this epistemological reorientation allows room for more pluralism in scientific practice itself
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References found in this work BETA
Hasok Chang, Operationalism. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.

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Citations of this work BETA
Alex Stewart Davies (2013). Kuhn on Incommensurability and Theory Choice. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science 44 (4):571-579.
David Ludwig (2013). Hysteria, Race, Phlogiston. A Model of Ontological Elimination in the Human Sciences. Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences:68-77.
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