Bounded awareness: what you fail to see can hurt you [Book Review]

Mind and Society 6 (1):1-18 (2007)
Abstract
ObjectiveWe argue that people often fail to perceive and process stimuli easily available to them. In other words, we challenge the tacit assumption that awareness is unbounded and provide evidence that humans regularly fail to see and use stimuli and information easily available to them. We call this phenomenon “bounded awareness” (Bazerman and Chugh in Frontiers of social psychology: negotiations, Psychology Press: College Park 2005). Findings We begin by first describing perceptual mental processes in which obvious information is missed—that is, simply not seen—by the visual perceiver. Inattentional blindness and change blindness are examples. We then extend this phenomenon to decision making and forecasting, using evidence about focalism to illustrate how people over focus on some information and fail to use other easily available information. We next examine how these processes of bounded awareness may extend to other important domains and across levels of analysis, such as information-sharing in groups, decision making in negotiators, and in competitive bidding situations such as auctions.ConclusionsBounded awareness is a phenomenon that encompasses a variety of psychological processes, all of which lead to the same error: a failure to see, seek, use, or share important and relevant information that is easily seen, sought, used, or shared
Keywords Bounded awareness  Focusing  Focalism  Winner’s curse  Bounded rationality  Inattentional blindness  Change blindness
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References found in this work BETA
Stephen R. Mitroff, Daniel J. Simons & Steven Franconeri (2002). The Siren Song of Implicit Change Detection. Journal Of Experimental Psychology-Human Perception And Performance 28 (4):798-815.

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Citations of this work BETA
Jeffrey Dunn (2012). Evidential Externalism. Philosophical Studies 158 (3):435-455.
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