A renewed, ethical defense of placebo-controlled trials of new treatments for major depression and anxiety disorders

Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (6):384-389 (2009)
Abstract
The use of placebo as a control condition in clinical trials of major depressive disorder and anxiety disorders continues to be an area of ethical concern. Typically, opponents of placebo controls argue that they violate the beneficent-based, “best proven diagnostic and therapeutic method” that the original Helsinki Declaration of 1964 famously asserted participants are owed. A more consequentialist, oppositional argument is that participants receiving placebo might suffer enormously by being deprived of their usual medication(s). Nevertheless, recent findings of potential for suicidality in young people treated with antidepressants, along with meta-analyses suggesting that antidepressants add no significant clinical benefit over placebos, warrant a re-evaluation of the arguments against placebo. Furthermore, the nature of placebo treatment in short-term clinical trials is often not well understood, and lack of understanding can foster opposition to it. This paper will show how scientific justifications for placebo use are morally relevant. The fundamental ethical importance of placebo controls is discussed in relation to several aspects of clinical trials, including detection of adverse events, accurate assessment of clinical benefit, advancing understanding of the heterogeneity of depression and anxiety disorders and respecting informed consent requirements. Prohibiting the use of placebo controls is morally concerning in that such prohibitions allow for the possibility of serious adverse public health consequences. Moral worries that research participants receiving placebo are being unduly jeopardised will be shown to be exaggerated, especially in relation to the net benefits for end-users to be gained from the quality of data resulting from using placebo controls
Keywords info:mesh/Informed Consent  info:mesh/Clinical Trials as Topic  info:mesh/Depressive Disorder, Major  info:mesh/Antidepressive Agents  info:mesh/Research Design  info:mesh/Humans  Humans   Antidepressive Agents   Placebos   Anxiety Disorders   Depressive Disorder, Major   Research Design   Informed Consent   Clinical Trials as Topic  info:mesh/Anxiety Disorders  info:mesh/Placebos
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Olov Lindahl & Lars Lindwall (1982). Is All Therapy Just a Placebo Effect? Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 3 (2):255-259.
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