The Way We Think: Conceptual Blending and the Mind's Hidden Complexities

Basic Books (2002)
Abstract
Until recently, cognitive science focused on such mental functions as problem solving, grammar, and pattern-the functions in which the human mind most closely resembles a computer. But humans are more than computers: we invent new meanings, imagine wildly, and even have ideas that have never existed before. Today the cutting edge of cognitive science addresses precisely these mysterious, creative aspects of the mind.The Way We Think is a landmark analysis of the imaginative nature of the mind. Conceptual blending is already widely known in research laboratories throughout the world; this book, written to be accessible to both lay readers and interested scientists, is its definitive statement. Gilles Fauconnier and Mark Turner show that conceptual blending is the root of the cognitively modern human mind, and that conceptual blends themselves are continually combined and reblended to create the rich mental fabric in which we live.The Way We Think shows how this blending operates; how it is affected by (and gives rise to) language, identity, culture, and invention; and how we imagine what could be and what might have been. The result is a bold and exciting new view of how the mind works.
Keywords Concepts  Thought and thinking
Categories (categorize this paper)
Buy the book $5.48 used (76% off)   $11.85 new (47% off)   $14.10 direct from Amazon (36% off)    Amazon page
Call number BF443.F38 2002
ISBN(s) 0465087868   9780465087860
Options
 Save to my reading list
Follow the author(s)
My bibliography
Export citation
Find it on Scholar
Edit this record
Mark as duplicate
Revision history Request removal from index
 
Download options
PhilPapers Archive


Upload a copy of this paper     Check publisher's policy on self-archival     Papers currently archived: 10,374
External links
Setup an account with your affiliations in order to access resources via your University's proxy server
Configure custom proxy (use this if your affiliation does not provide a proxy)
Through your library
References found in this work BETA

No references found.

Citations of this work BETA
Jean M. Mandler (2008). On the Birth and Growth of Concepts. Philosophical Psychology 21 (2):207 – 230.

View all 29 citations

Similar books and articles
Analytics

Monthly downloads

Added to index

2009-01-28

Total downloads

30 ( #55,912 of 1,096,880 )

Recent downloads (6 months)

2 ( #164,383 of 1,096,880 )

How can I increase my downloads?

My notes
Sign in to use this feature


Discussion
Start a new thread
Order:
There  are no threads in this forum
Nothing in this forum yet.