Deterritorialisation and Schizoanalysis in David Fincher's Fight Club

Deleuze Studies 5 (2):275-299 (2011)
Abstract
Taking a schizoanalytic approach to audio-visual images, this article explores some of the radical potentia for deterritorialisation found within David Fincher's Fight Club (1999). The film's potential for deterritorialisation is initially located in an exploration of the film's form and content, which appear designed to interrogate and transcend a series of false binaries between mind and body, inside and outside, male and female. Paying attention to the construction of photorealistic digital spaces and composited images, we examine the actual (and possible) ways viewers relate to the film, both during and after screenings. Recognising the film as an affective force performing within our world, we also investigate some of the real-world effects the film catalysed. Finally, we propose that schizoanalysis, when applied to a Hollywood film, suggests that Deleuze underestimated the deterritorialising potential of contemporary, special effects-driven cinema. If schizoanalysis has thus been reterritorialised by mainstream products, we argue that new, ‘post-Deleuzian’ lines of flight are required to disrupt this ‘de-re-territorialisation’
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References found in this work BETA
David Bordwell (1996). Convention, Construction, and Cinematic Vision. In David Bordwell Noel Carroll (ed.), Post-Theory: Reconstructing Film Studies. University of Wisconsin Press. 87--107.

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