Two legs, thing using and talking: The origins of the creative engineering mind [Book Review]

AI and Society 12 (3):185-213 (1998)
Abstract
Instead of seeing technology as outside ourselves, it is argued that it is an innate human function and the main driving force in human evolution. Opportunistic ‘thing using’, long before stone tools appeared, was the likeliest cause of bipedalism. It also forced brain development and the emergence of creativity. The neural basis for this creative technical activity later provided the brain functions on which language could develop. This simple unifying hypothesis has interesting implications for the way that we see technology in history, and for determinist theories of the future. It also bears on the way engineers are trained, and more important, the human faculties which need to be fostered in children
Keywords Bipedalism  Creativity  Language origins  Palaeontology  Technology  Tool using
Categories No categories specified
(categorize this paper)
Options
 Save to my reading list
Follow the author(s)
My bibliography
Export citation
Find it on Scholar
Edit this record
Mark as duplicate
Revision history Request removal from index
 
Download options
PhilPapers Archive


Upload a copy of this paper     Check publisher's policy on self-archival     Papers currently archived: 11,817
External links
Setup an account with your affiliations in order to access resources via your University's proxy server
Configure custom proxy (use this if your affiliation does not provide a proxy)
Through your library
References found in this work BETA
Citations of this work BETA

No citations found.

Similar books and articles
Peter Carruthers (2011). Creative Action in Mind. Philosophical Psychology 24 (4):437 - 461.
Mike W. Martin (2006). Moral Creativity in Science and Engineering. Science and Engineering Ethics 12 (3):421-433.
George Allan (1999). Forms, Transforms, and the Creative Process. The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 1999:231-238.
Analytics

Monthly downloads

Sorry, there are not enough data points to plot this chart.

Added to index

2010-08-30

Total downloads

0

Recent downloads (6 months)

0

How can I increase my downloads?

My notes
Sign in to use this feature


Discussion
Start a new thread
Order:
There  are no threads in this forum
Nothing in this forum yet.