Particles and Paradoxes: The Limits of Quantum Logic

Cambridge University Press (1987)
Abstract
Quantum theory is our deepest theory of the nature of matter. It is a theory that, notoriously, produces results which challenge the laws of classical logic and suggests that the physical world is illogical. This book gives a critical review of work on the foundations of quantum mechanics at a level accessible to non-experts. Assuming his readers have some background in mathematics and physics, Peter Gibbins focuses on the questions of whether the results of quantum theory require us to abandon classical logic and whether quantum logic can resolve the paradoxes produced by quantum mechanics. He argues that quantum logic does not dispose of the problems faced by classical logic, that no reasonable interpretation of quantum mechanics in terms of 'hidden variables' can be found, and that after all these years quantum mechanics remains a mystery to us. Particles and Paradoxes provides a much-needed and valuable introduction to the philosophy of quantum mechanics and, at the same time, an example of just what it is to do the philosophy of physics.
Keywords Quantum logic  Physics Philosophy
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Call number QC174.12.G52 1987
ISBN(s) 0521334985   0521336910  
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Mara Beller (1992). The Birth of Bohr's Complementarity: The Context and the Dialogues. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 23 (1):147-180.
Carsten Held (1994). The Meaning of Complementarity. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 25 (6):871-893.
Niall Shanks (1993). Time and the Propensity Interpretation of Probability. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 24 (2):293 - 302.

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