Much Ado About Nothing: Theories of Space and Vacuum From the Middle Ages to the Scientific Revolution

Cambridge University Press (1981)
Abstract
The primary objective of this study is to provide a description of the major ideas about void space within and beyond the world that were formulated between the fourteenth and early eighteenth centuries. The second part of the book - on infinite, extracosmic void space - is of special significance. The significance of Professor Grant's account is twofold: it provides the first comprehensive and detailed description of the scholastic Aristotelian arguments for and against the existence of void space; and it presents (again for the first time) an analysis of the possible influence of scholastic ideas and arguments on the interpretations of space proposed by the nonscholastic authors who made the Scientific Revolution possible. The concluding chapter of the book is unique in not only describing the conceptualizations of space proposed by the makers of the Scientific Revolution, but in assessing the role of readily available scholastic ideas on the conception of space adopted for the Newtonian world.
Keywords Space and time History  Vacuum History  Science History  Science Philosophy  Science, Medieval
Categories (categorize this paper)
Buy the book $46.89 new (21% off)   $61.03 used   $188.72 direct from Amazon (11% off)    Amazon page
Call number QC173.59.S65.G72
ISBN(s) 9780521229838   052106192X   0521229839
Options
 Save to my reading list
Follow the author(s)
My bibliography
Export citation
Find it on Scholar
Edit this record
Mark as duplicate
Revision history Request removal from index
 
Download options
PhilPapers Archive


Upload a copy of this paper     Check publisher's policy on self-archival     Papers currently archived: 10,561
External links
Setup an account with your affiliations in order to access resources via your University's proxy server
Configure custom proxy (use this if your affiliation does not provide a proxy)
Through your library
References found in this work BETA

No references found.

Citations of this work BETA
Robert Palter (1987). Saving Newton's Text: Documents, Readers, and the Ways of the World. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science 18 (4):385--439.
Similar books and articles
Analytics

Monthly downloads

Added to index

2009-01-28

Total downloads

41 ( #40,098 of 1,098,129 )

Recent downloads (6 months)

6 ( #42,748 of 1,098,129 )

How can I increase my downloads?

My notes
Sign in to use this feature


Discussion
Start a new thread
Order:
There  are no threads in this forum
Nothing in this forum yet.