Reading the mind of God (without hebrew lessons): Alston, shared attention, and mystical experience

Religious Studies 45 (4):455-470 (2009)
Abstract
Alston's perceptual account of mystical experience fails to show how it is that the sort of predicates that are used to describe God in these experiences could be derived from perception, even though the ascription of matched predicates in the natural order are not derived in the manner Alston has in mind. In contrast, if one looks to research on shared attention between individuals as mediated by mirror neurons, then one can give a perceptual account of mystical experience which draws a tighter connection between what is reported in mystical reports and the most similar reports in the natural order
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    References found in this work BETA
    Richard Gale (1994). Why Alston's Mystical Doxastic Practice Is Subjective. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 54 (4):869 - 875.
    Citations of this work BETA
    Rolfe King (2013). Divine Self-Testimony and the Knowledge of God. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 74 (3):279-295.
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