The metaphysics of causal models: Where's the biff?

Erkenntnis 68 (2):149-68 (2008)
This paper presents an attempt to integrate theories of causal processes—of the kind developed by Wesley Salmon and Phil Dowe—into a theory of causal models using Bayesian networks. We suggest that arcs in causal models must correspond to possible causal processes. Moreover, we suggest that when processes are rendered physically impossible by what occurs on distinct paths, the original model must be restricted by removing the relevant arc. These two techniques suffice to explain cases of late preëmption and other cases that have proved problematic for causal models.
Keywords Causation  Causal models  Processes  Counterfactuals  Preëmption
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DOI 10.2307/40267473
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References found in this work BETA
Phil Dowe (2000). Physical Causation. Cambridge University Press.
David Lewis (2000). Causation as Influence. Journal of Philosophy 97 (4):182-197.
David Lewis (1973). Causation. Journal of Philosophy 70 (17):556-567.

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Rachael Briggs (2012). Interventionist Counterfactuals. Philosophical Studies 160 (1):139-166.

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