Observations on Man, His Frame, His Duty, and His Expectations

New York,Garland Pub. (1749)
Abstract
The orphaned son of an Anglican clergyman, David Hartley was originally destined for holy orders. Declining to subscribe to the Thirty-Nine Articles, he turned to medicine and science yet remained a religious believer. This, his most significant work, provides a rigorous analysis of human nature, blending philosophy, psychology and theology. First published in two volumes in 1749, Observations on Man is notable for being based on the doctrine of the association of ideas. It greatly influenced scientists, theologians, social reformers and poets: Samuel Taylor Coleridge, who named his eldest son after Hartley, had his portrait painted while holding a copy. Volume 2 is particularly concerned with human morality and the duty and expectations of mankind. Here the author is keen to show that scientific observation is not necessarily in conflict with religious conviction
Keywords Philosophy  Apologetics
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Call number B1375.O3 1749aa
ISBN(s) 1143978463   9781108063616
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Thomas Sturm (2008). Why Did Kant Reject Physiological Explanations in His Anthropology? Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 39 (4):495-505.
Godfrey Vesey (1986). Hume on Liberty and Necessity. Royal Institute of Philosophy Lectures 20:111-127.

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