Where No Mind Has Gone Before: Exploring Laws in Distant and Lonely Worlds

Abstract
Do the laws of nature supervene on ordinary, non-nomic matters of fact? Lange's criticism of Humean supervenience (HS) plays a key role in his account of natural laws. Though we are sympathetic to his account, we remain unconvinced by his criticism. We focus on his thought experiment involving a world containing nothing but a lone proton and argue that it does not cast sufficient doubt on HS. In addition, we express some concern about locating the lawmakers in an ontology of primitive subjunctive facts and suggest that a 'mixed' metaphysics to the lawmaker question might be attractive
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References found in this work BETA
Helen Beebee (2000). The Non-Governing Conception of Laws of Nature. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 61 (3):571-594.
Fred I. Dretske (1977). Laws of Nature. Philosophy of Science 44 (2):248-268.
Philip Kitcher (1984). Species. Philosophy of Science 51 (2):308-333.

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