Kant, quasi-realism, and the autonomy of aesthetic judgement

European Journal of Philosophy 9 (2):166–189 (2001)
Abstract
Aesthetic judgements are autonomous, as many other judgements are not: for the latter, but not the former, it is sometimes justifiable to change one's mind simply because several others share a different opinion. Why is this? One answer is that claims about beauty are not assertions at all, but expressions of aesthetic response. However, to cover more than just some of the explananda, this expressivism needs combining with some analogue of cognitive command, i.e. the idea that disagreements over beuaty can occur, and when they do it is a priori that one side has infringed the norms governing aesthetic discourse. This combination can be achieved by reading Kant’s aesthetic theory in expressivist terms. The resulting view is a form of quasi-realism about beauty. The position has its merits, but cannot ultimately explain the phenomena which motivate it. This conclusion generalises to quasi-realism about other matters.
Keywords Kant  Aesthetics  Quasi-realism  Expressivism  Third Critique  Frege-Geach problem  Testimony
Categories (categorize this paper)
Options
 Save to my reading list
Follow the author(s)
My bibliography
Export citation
Find it on Scholar
Edit this record
Mark as duplicate
Revision history Request removal from index
 
Download options
PhilPapers Archive


Upload a copy of this paper     Check publisher's policy on self-archival     Papers currently archived: 9,360
External links
  • Through your library Configure
    References found in this work BETA

    No references found.

    Citations of this work BETA
    Katalin Makkai (2010). Kant on Recognizing Beauty. European Journal of Philosophy 18 (3):385-413.
    Jon Robson (2012). Aesthetic Testimony. Philosophy Compass 7 (1):1-10.
    Derek Matravers & Jerrold Levinson (2005). Derek Matravers. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 79 (1):191–210.
    Similar books and articles
    Analytics

    Monthly downloads

    Added to index

    2009-01-28

    Total downloads

    77 ( #14,322 of 1,089,155 )

    Recent downloads (6 months)

    3 ( #30,953 of 1,089,155 )

    How can I increase my downloads?

    My notes
    Sign in to use this feature


    Discussion
    Start a new thread
    Order:
    There  are no threads in this forum
    Nothing in this forum yet.