Imaging the brain: visualising “pathological entities”? Searching for reliable protocols within psychiatry and their impact on the understanding of psychiatric diseases [Book Review]

Poiesis and Praxis 6 (1-2):27-41 (2008)
Abstract
Given that visualisations via medical imaging have tremendously increased over the last decades, the overall presence of colour-coded brain slices generated on the basis of functional imaging, i.e. neuroimaging techniques, have led to the assumption of so-called kinds of brains or cognitive profiles that might be especially related to non-healthy humans affected by neurological, neuropsychological or psychiatric syndromes or disorders. In clinical contexts especially, one must consider that visualisations through medical imaging are suggestive in a twofold way. Imaging data not only visually render pathological entities, but also tend to represent objective and concrete evidence for these psychophysical states in question. This article aims to identify key issues in visually rendering psychiatric disorders via functional approaches of imaging within the neurosciences from an epistemological point of view
Keywords No keywords specified (fix it)
Categories (categorize this paper)
DOI 10.1007/s10202-008-0055-1
Options
 Save to my reading list
Follow the author(s)
My bibliography
Export citation
Find it on Scholar
Edit this record
Mark as duplicate
Revision history Request removal from index
 
Download options
PhilPapers Archive


Upload a copy of this paper     Check publisher's policy on self-archival     Papers currently archived: 20,898
External links
Setup an account with your affiliations in order to access resources via your University's proxy server
Configure custom proxy (use this if your affiliation does not provide a proxy)
Through your library
References found in this work BETA
Lorraine Daston (2007). Objectivity. Distributed by the MIT Press.

View all 26 references / Add more references

Citations of this work BETA

No citations found.

Add more citations

Similar books and articles
Brendan D. Kelly (2012). Brain Imaging in Clinical Psychiatry : Why? In Sarah Richmond, Geraint Rees & Sarah J. L. Edwards (eds.), I Know What You're Thinking: Brain Imaging and Mental Privacy. Oxford University Press 111.
Sarah Richmond (2012). Brain Imaging and the Transparency Scenario. In Sarah Richmond, Geraint Rees & Sarah J. L. Edwards (eds.), I Know What You're Thinking: Brain Imaging and Mental Privacy. Oxford University Press 185.

Monthly downloads

Added to index

2010-09-02

Total downloads

6 ( #466,594 of 1,907,446 )

Recent downloads (6 months)

1 ( #464,819 of 1,907,446 )

How can I increase my downloads?

My notes
Sign in to use this feature


Discussion
Start a new thread
Order:
There  are no threads in this forum
Nothing in this forum yet.