Rewarding performance feedback alters reported time of action

Consciousness and Cognition 20 (4):1577-1585 (2011)
Past studies have shown that the perceived time of actions is retrospectively influenced by post-action events. The current study examined whether rewarding performance feedback altered the reported time of action. In Experiment 1, participants performed a speeded button press task and received monetary reward for a presumed “fast,” or a monetary punishment for a presumed “slow” response. Rewarded trials resulted in the false perception that the response action occurred earlier than punished trials. In Experiments 2 and 3, the need for a speeded response and reward were independently manipulated in order to decouple the cognitive and reward components in the feedback signal. When tested independently, neither variable affected the judged time of action. We conclude that meaningful feedback is only used when made salient by reward, to modulate the judged time of an action
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DOI 10.1016/j.concog.2011.08.004
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James Moore (2007). Awareness of Action: Inference and Prediction. Consciousness and Cognition 17 (1):136-144.

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