Philosophical Foundations of the Social Sciences: Analyzing Controversies in Social Research

Cambridge University Press (1996)
This book defends the prospects for a science of society. It argues that behind the diverse methods of the natural sciences lies a common core of scientific rationality that the social sciences can and sometimes do achieve. It also argues that good social science must be in part about large-scale social structures and processes and thus that methodological individualism is misguided. These theses are supported by a detailed discussion of actual social research, including theories of agrarian revolution, organizational ecology, social theories of depression, and supply-demand explanations in economics. Professor Kincaid provides a general picture of explanation and confirmation in the social sciences and discusses the nature of scientific rationality, functional explanation, optimality arguments, meaning and interpretation, the place of microfoundations in social explanation, the status of neo-classical economics, the role of idealizations and non-experimental evidence, and other specific controversies.
Keywords Social sciences Research  Social sciences Philosophy
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Call number H62.K515 1996
ISBN(s) 0521558913   0521482682   9780521558914  
DOI 10.2307/2653576
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Julian Reiss (2012). The Explanation Paradox. Journal of Economic Methodology 19 (1):43-62.
Robert Kowalenko (2014). Ceteris Paribus Laws: A Naturalistic Account. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 28 (2):133-155.
Caterina Marchionni (2013). Playing with Networks: How Economists Explain. [REVIEW] European Journal for Philosophy of Science 3 (3):331-352.

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