Did the Chinese Have a Change of Heart?

Cognitive Science 36 (2):179-182 (2012)
In their “The Prevalence of Mind-Body Dualism in Early China,” Slingerland and Chudek use a statistical analysis of the early Chinese corpus to argue for Weak Folk Dualism (WFD). We raise three methodological objections to their analysis. First, the change over time that they find is largely driven by genre. Second, the operationalization of WFD is potentially misleading. And, third, dating the texts they use is extremely controversial. We conclude with some positive remarks
Keywords Early China  Chinese thought  Comparative psychology  Textual analysis
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DOI 10.1111/j.1551-6709.2011.01231.x
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References found in this work BETA
Franklin Perkins (2009). Motivation and the Heart in the Xing Zi Ming Chu. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 8 (2):117-131.

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Timothy A. Johnson (2007). Time for Change. Southern Journal of Philosophy 45 (4):497-513.
Steven D. Hales & Timothy A. Johnson (2007). Time for Change. Southern Journal of Philosophy 45 (4):497-513.

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