The Function of Credit in Hull's Evolutionary Model of Science

This paper first argues that evolutionary models of conceptual development which are patterned on Darwinian selection are unlikely to solve the demarcation problem. The persistence of myths shows that in most social environments unfalsifiable ideas are more likely to survive than ones which can be subjected to empirical scrutiny. I then analyze Hull's claims about how the credit system operates in science and conclude with him that it can perform a surprising variety of functions. However I argue that the credit system must be constantly tempered by internalized norms which encapsulate the traditional ultimate aims of science.
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DOI 10.2307/193071
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