Practical Interests, Relevant Alternatives, and Knowledge Attributions: An Empirical Study [Book Review]

Review of Philosophy and Psychology 1 (2):265–273 (2010)
Abstract
In defending his interest-relative account of knowledge in Knowledge and Practical Interests (2005), Jason Stanley relies heavily on intuitions about several bank cases. We experimentally test the empirical claims that Stanley seems to make concerning our common-sense intuitions about these bank cases. Additionally, we test the empirical claims that Jonathan Schaffer seems to make in his critique of Stanley. We argue that our data impugn what both Stanley and Schaffer claim our intuitions about such cases are. To account for these results, one must develop a better conception of the connection between a subject's interests and her body of knowledge than those offered by Stanley and Schaffer.
Keywords subject sensitive invariantism  bank cases  contextualism
Categories (categorize this paper)
Options
 Save to my reading list
Follow the author(s)
My bibliography
Export citation
Find it on Scholar
Edit this record
Mark as duplicate
Revision history Request removal from index
 
Download options
PhilPapers Archive
External links
  •   Try with proxy.
  • Through your library Configure
    References found in this work BETA
    Citations of this work BETA

    View all 18 citations

    Similar books and articles
    Analytics

    Monthly downloads

    Added to index

    2009-02-05

    Total downloads

    164 ( #3,226 of 1,089,047 )

    Recent downloads (6 months)

    8 ( #13,556 of 1,089,047 )

    How can I increase my downloads?

    My notes
    Sign in to use this feature


    Discussion
    Start a new thread
    Order:
    There  are no threads in this forum
    Nothing in this forum yet.