Size doesn't matter: Towards a more inclusive philosophy of biology [Book Review]

Biology and Philosophy 22 (2):155-191 (2007)
Abstract
Philosophers of biology, along with everyone else, generally perceive life to fall into two broad categories, the microbes and macrobes, and then pay most of their attention to the latter. ‘Macrobe’ is the word we propose for larger life forms, and we use it as part of an argument for microbial equality. We suggest that taking more notice of microbes – the dominant life form on the planet, both now and throughout evolutionary history – will transform some of the philosophy of biology’s standard ideas on ontology, evolution, taxonomy and biodiversity. We set out a number of recent developments in microbiology – including biofilm formation, chemotaxis, quorum sensing and gene transfer – that highlight microbial capacities for cooperation and communication and break down conventional thinking that microbes are solely or primarily single-celled organisms. These insights also bring new perspectives to the levels of selection debate, as well as to discussions of the evolution and nature of multicellularity, and to neo-Darwinian understandings of evolutionary mechanisms. We show how these revisions lead to further complications for microbial classification and the philosophies of systematics and biodiversity. Incorporating microbial insights into the philosophy of biology will challenge many of its assumptions, but also give greater scope and depth to its investigations.
Keywords Biodiversity  Evolution  Macrobes  Microbes  Microbiology  Multicellularity  Ontology  Prokaryotes  Taxonomy
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    Maureen A. O'Malley (2010). The First Eukaryote Cell: An Unfinished History of Contestation. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 41 (3):212-224.
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