'Spuntar lo scoglio più duro': did Galileo ever think the most beautiful thought experiment in the history of science?

Still today it remains unclear whether Galileo ever climbed the leaning tower of Pisa in order to drop bodies from its top. Some believe that he established the principle of equal speeds for falling bodies by means of an ingenious thought experiment. However, the reconstruction of that thought experiment circulating in the philosophical literature is no more than a cartoon. In this paper I will tell the story of the thought processes behind the cartoon.Keywords: Galileo Galilei; Thought experiment; Falling bodies
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DOI 10.1016/j.shpsa.2005.03.001
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John Norton (1996). Are Thought Experiments Just What You Thought? Canadian Journal of Philosophy 26 (3):333 - 366.
David Atkinson (2004). Galileo and Prior Philosophy. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 35 (1):115-136.

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