How Helen Keller Used Syntactic Semantics to Escape from a Chinese Room

Minds and Machines 16 (4):381-436 (2006)
Abstract
A computer can come to understand natural language the same way Helen Keller did: by using “syntactic semantics”—a theory of how syntax can suffice for semantics, i.e., how semantics for natural language can be provided by means of computational symbol manipulation. This essay considers real-life approximations of Chinese Rooms, focusing on Helen Keller’s experiences growing up deaf and blind, locked in a sort of Chinese Room yet learning how to communicate with the outside world. Using the SNePS computational knowledge-representation system, the essay analyzes Keller’s belief that learning that “everything has a name” was the key to her success, enabling her to “partition” her mental concepts into mental representations of: words, objects, and the naming relations between them. It next looks at Herbert Terrace’s theory of naming, which is akin to Keller’s, and which only humans are supposed to be capable of. The essay suggests that computers at least, and perhaps non-human primates, are also capable of this kind of naming.
Keywords Animal communication  Chinese Room Argument  Helen Keller  Herbert Terrace  Knowledge representation  Names  Natural-language understanding  SNePS  Syntactic semantics
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    William Rapaport (2011). Yes, She Was! Minds and Machines 21 (1):3-17.
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    William Rapaport (2011). Yes, She Was! Minds and Machines 21 (1):3-17.
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    Justin Leiber (1996). Helen Keller as Cognitive Scientist. Philosophical Psychology 9 (4):419 – 440.
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