On time, memory and dynamic form

Consciousness and Cognition 13 (4):762-788 (2004)
A common approach to explaining the perception of form is through the use of static features. The weakness of this approach points naturally to dynamic definitions of form. Considering dynamical form, however, leads inevitably to the need to explain how events are perceived as time-extended—a problem with primacy over that even of qualia. Optic flow models, energy models, models reliant on a rigidity constraint are examined. The reliance of these models on the instantaneous specification of form at an instant, t, or across a series of such instants forces the consideration of the primary memory supporting both the perception of time-extended events and the time-extension of consciousness. This cannot be reduced to an integration over space and time. The difficulty of defining the basis for this memory is highlighted in considerations of dynamic form in relation to scales of time. Ultimately, the possibility is raised that psychology must follow physics in a more profound approach to time and motion
Keywords *Form and Shape Perception  *Memory  *Time  Models  Motion Perception
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DOI 10.1016/j.concog.2004.07.006
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References found in this work BETA
Hans Wallach & D. N. O'Connell (1953). The Kinetic Depth Effect. Journal of Experimental Psychology 45 (4):205.
John G. Taylor (2002). From Matter to Mind. Journal of Consciousness Studies 9 (4):3-22.

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Citations of this work BETA
Stephen E. Robbins (2006). Bergson and the Holographic Theory of Mind. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 5 (3-4):365-394.
Stephen E. Robbins (2009). The Cost of Explicit Memory. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 8 (1):33-66.

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