Climate change and the duties of the advantaged

Climate change poses grave threats to many people, including the most vulnerable. This prompts the question of who should bear the burden of combating ?dangerous? climate change. Many appeal to the Polluter Pays Principle. I argue that it should play an important role in any adequate analysis of the responsibility to combat climate change, but suggest that it suffers from three limitations and that it needs to be revised. I then consider the Ability to Pay Principle and consider four objections to this principle. I suggest that, when suitably modified, it can supplement the Polluter Pays Principle
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DOI 10.1080/13698230903326331
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References found in this work BETA
Darrel Moellendorf (2002). Cosmopolitan Justice. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).

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Citations of this work BETA
Anne Schwenkenbecher (2012). Is There an Obligation to Reduce One’s Individual Carbon Footprint? Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy (2):1-21.

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