Liberalism, Citizenship, and the Private Interest in Schooling

Studies in Philosophy and Education 17 (4):221-229 (1998)
Abstract
Schools in liberal societies are responsible for producing liberal citizens. However, if they have too robust a view of citizenship, they may find themselves undermining the view of good lives held by many pacific and law abiding groups. Here I argue against treating citizenship as an educational good that simply trumps private values when they conflict and in favor of a view that seeks a context sensitive balance between such conflicting goods. The paper explores Rawls's distinction between two moral powers as a way of understanding the character of some of the private interests in schooling
Keywords liberalism  citizenship  Rawls  schooling
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