Could embodied simulation be a by-product of emotion perception?

Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (6):449 - 449 (2010)
Abstract
The SIMS model claims that it is by means of an embodied simulation that we determine the meaning of an observed smile. This suggests that crucial interpretative work is done in the mapping that takes us from a perceived smile to the activation of one's own facial musculature. How is this mapping achieved? Might it depend upon a prior interpretation arrived at on the basis of perceptual and contextual information?
Keywords emotion  expression  perception  simulation
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