New books and articles

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Oct 31st 2014 GMT
forthcoming articles
  1. Eric Desjardins, Historicity and Ecological Restoration.
    This paper analyzes the relevance and interconnection of two forms of historicity in ecological restoration, namely historical fidelity and path dependence. Historical fidelity is the practice of attempting to restore an ecological system to some sort of idealized past condition. Path dependence occurs when a system can evolve in alternative local equilibria, and that the order and timing of the events that follow from the initial state influence which equilibrium is reached. Using theoretical examples and case studies, the following analysis (...)
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volume 14, issue 3, 2014
  1. Udo Schuklenk, Bioethics and the Ebola Outbreak in West Africa.
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volume 30, issue 2, 2014
  1. David Oliver Kasdan, Teaching for Dissent.
    In Teaching for Dissent, Sarah Stitzlein argues that not only is American society obliged to include the concept of dissent in the educational curriculum, but that pragmatist doctrines provide encouraging rationale for its practice. When we think of dissent and education, they are usually at odds; images of student protests or a recalcitrant pupil are likely foremost in our minds. As the father of a rambunctious toddler, I am not so sure that teaching for dissent is high on my list (...)
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  2. Kathleen Knight-Abowitz, Introduction: Revisiting The Public and Its Problems.
    The 2013 Past President’s Panel at the Dewey Society annual meeting invited scholars to revisit the classic political text, The Public and Its Problems (1927). Four exceptional papers were presented at the session and are now gathered here to gain the wider audience they deserve.Dewey’s most comprehensive work of political theory and democratic politics, The Public and Its Problems was a response to the deeply embedded skepticism about participatory democracy and public life expressed by democratic realists of the era, most (...)
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  3. Roman Madzia, The Things in Heaven and Earth.
    What is ultimately real? Is there a fixed nature to reality? If so, is that nature knowable by the human mind? Philosophers have been confronted with these questions since the very inception of philosophy in ancient Greece. In the history of philosophy various answers to these intellectual riddles have been articulated. As a general rule, the metaphysical issues concerning the ultimate nature of reality have been dealt with from what we could call, along with Joseph Margolis, the perspective of archism.1 (...)
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  4. Thomas Misco, Controversial Issue Instruction in Context: A Social Studies Education Response to the Problem of the Public.
    At the end of The Public and Its Problems (Dewey, 1927/1954), John Dewey alighted upon the “the problem of the public,” which is the improvement of the “methods of debate, discussion, and persuasion” (p. 208). Given Dewey’s conception of democracy, one which is squarely focused on communicated experiences (Dewey, 1916) and beginning in conversation (as cited in Lamont, 1959, p. 88), the problem of the public (as well as the resolution) is congruent with the problem of democracy (Dewey, 1927/1954). The (...)
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  5. Stefano Oliverio, The Democratic Public To Be Brought Into Existence and Education as Secularization.
    A decade ago the German sociologist Ulrich Beck seemed to consign democracy to the past and, significantly, drew upon an ironically religion-inspired vocabulary:Democracy becomes the religion of the past epoch. One still practises it—on Sunday or on Christmas under the ‘Christmas tree’ of polls. But no one really still believes in it. It is the dead God of the first modernity.1When Ulrich Beck dismisses democracy as “the dead god” of a past era or as a liturgy drained of any substantial (...)
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  6. David Rondel, The Continuing Relevance of John Dewey.
    The Continuing Relevance of John Dewey: Reflections on Aesthetics, Morality, Science, and Society gathers selected and revised essays from a conference at the University of Opole in Poland. The conference, held in June 2009, marked the anniversary of John Dewey’s 150th birthday, and pursued as its stated theme: “John Dewey in the context of American and European Values.” The volume begins with an introduction by Larry Hickman, one of John Dewey’s most committed and energetic champions. The rest of the volume’s (...)
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  7. Amy B. Shuffelton, The Chicago Teachers Strike and Its Public.
    “Chicago is the place to make you recognize at every turn the absolute opportunity which chaos affords—it is sheer Matter with no standards at all,” John Dewey wrote to his wife Alice on an early visit there.1 Such a city, which had become the geographical nexus of American industrial democracy, pushed Dewey to consider the problems industrial modes of organization pose for democratic theory. His reconceptualization of democracy, and the refinements and clarifications to it that he made over the years, (...)
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  8. Jody L. Stark, The Potential of Deweyan-Inspired Action Research.
    This article examines the potential of Action Research informed by Dewey’s pragmatism as a research methodology in the social sciences. Not only a philosophical orientation, pragmatism is also a powerful mode of inquiry. When combined with the democratic research approach of Action Research, Deweyan pragmatism has great potential to shed light on educational and other social science questions, forward social change, and enact Dewey’s vision of radical social democracy. Although Dewey’s philosophy, one could argue, has never been mainstream in education (...)
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  9. Sarah M. Stitzlein, Habits of Democracy: A Deweyan Approach to Citizenship Education in America Today.
    Throughout his works, John Dewey makes deep and intriguing connections between democracy, education, and daily life. His ideas have contributed to both the theory and practice of participatory democracy and, although he actually “had surprisingly little to say about democratic citizenship” directly, his scholarship has influenced the ideas of others working on citizenship education and has provided rich notions of democracy, education, experience, and public life underlying it.1 However, Dewey commentators Michael Eldridge and Robert Westbrook worry that, although Dewey promoted (...)
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  10. Leonard Waks, Literary Art in the Formation of the Great Community: John Dewey's Theory of Public Ideas in The Public and Its Problems.
    John Dewey presented The Public and Its Problems in a series of lectures in 1926, shortly after Walter Lippmann published two influential works, Public Opinion (1922) and The Phantom Public (1925). In those works, Lippmann had denied that broad publics should share in determining public policy. He argued that the policy issues were far removed from the lives of ordinary citizens, whose collective opinion, as a result, would inevitably be ill-informed, self-interested and readily manipulated.Dewey countered that the problem of public (...)
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forthcoming articles
  1. Adrian Skilbeck, Serious Words for Serious Subjects.
    In this paper, I create philosophical space for the importance of how we say things as an adjunct to attending to what is said, drawing on Stanley Cavell's discussions of moral perfectionism and passionate utterance. In the light of this, I assess claims made for the contribution drama makes to moral education. In Cities of Words, Cavell gestures towards Plato's dialogue Euthyphro, where Socrates asks what kind of disagreement causes hatred and anger. The answer is disagreement on moral questions. The (...)
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volume 55, issue 6, 2014
  1. Neil Ormerod, Gilson and Lonergan and the Possibility of A Christian Philosophy.
    Etienne Gilson was a strong promoter of the notion of a ‘Christian philosophy’. He viewed it as a type of historical practice whereby Christian thinkers are spurred by revelation to develop philosophical positions congruent with revelation, but which are defensible by reason alone. This paper reviews Gilson's notion of Christian philosophy and argues that the philosophical position of Bernard Lonergan is one example of such a practice.
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forthcoming articles
  1. Mark Philp, Redeeming the Prince.
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  2. Andrew Wells, Racisms: From the Crusades to the Twentieth Century.
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forthcoming articles
  1. Paul H. Mason, The Liminal Body.
    If James has a latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI), he is at risk of developing active tuberculosis disease but he is not yet sick. LTBI is a liminal space between health and illness. Diagnosed with LTBI, James could be conceptualised as having a liminal body. Treatments for LTBI are available, but why would a person seek treatment for a disease he does not yet have? One thing is definite: James needs to be educated about the symptoms and severity of active tuberculosis (...)
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forthcoming articles
  1. Elisa Freschi, The Reuse of Texts in Indian Philosophy: Introduction.
    The study of textual reuse is of fundamental importance in reconstructing lost or partially lost texts, passages of which can be partly recovered through other texts in which they have been embedded. Furthermore, the study of textual reuse also provides one with a deeper understanding of the modalities of the production of texts out of previous textual materials. Finally, it constitutes a unique chance to reconsider the historicity of concepts such as “author”, “originality” and “plagiarism”, which do not denote really (...)
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volume 171, issue 3, 2014
  1. John Bengson, How Philosophers Use Intuition and 'Intuition'.
    Whither the philosophy of intuition?Herman Cappelen’s Philosophy Without Intuitions (PWI) is a novel study in philosophical sociology—or, as Cappelen at one point suggests, “intellectual anthropology” (96).All undated references are to Cappelen (2012). Its target is the thesis that intuition is central, in the descriptive sense that contemporary analytic philosophers rely on intuitions for evidence—or, more generally, positive epistemic status. Cappelen labels the target thesis Centrality.If Centrality is true, then especially urgent are two questions in the rapidly growing field that is (...)
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  2. Jonathan Birch, Propositional Content in Signalling Systems.
    Skyrms, building on the work of Dretske, has recently developed a novel information-theoretic account of propositional content in simple signalling systems. Information-theoretic accounts of content traditionally struggle to accommodate the possibility of misrepresentation, and I show that Skyrms’s account is no exception. I proceed to argue, however, that a modified version of Skyrms’s account can overcome this problem. On my proposed account, the propositional content of a signal is determined not by the information that it actually carries, but by the (...)
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  3. Herman Cappelen, Précis of Philosophy Without Intuitions.
    Philosophy without intuitions (hereafter, ‘PWI’) is in many ways a simple book. It has a simple guiding question:Guiding Question (GQ). Is it characteristic of philosophers that they rely on intuitions as evidence?The central thesis of the book is also simple: the answer to GQ is ‘No’. A corollary is that all the work that assumes a positive answer, e.g. experimental philosophy and what I call ‘methodological rationalism’, is based on a false assumption.For those familiar with the last 30 years of (...)
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  4. Herman Cappelen, Replies to Weatherson, Chalmers, Weinberg, and Bengson.
    Reply to criticsThe replies in this symposium are some of the most insightful contributions to contemporary metaphilosophy I have read. I wish I had seen them before I wrote Philosophy without Intuitions (PWI, 2011). It would have made it a better book. I also wish I had space to explore all the important issues raised, but unfortunately, the focus here will have to be on points of disagreement. The replies build on each other—I draw on material from the earlier replies (...)
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  5. David J. Chalmers, Intuitions in Philosophy: A Minimal Defense.
    In Philosophy Without Intuitions, Herman Cappelen (2012) focuses on the metaphilosophical thesis he calls Centrality: contemporary analytic philosophers rely on intuitions as evidence for philosophical theories. Using linguistic and textual analysis, he argues that Centrality is false. He also suggests that because most philosophers accept Centrality, they have mistaken beliefs about their own methods.To put my own views on the table: I do not have a large theoretical stake in the status of intuitions, but unreflectively I find it fairly obvious (...)
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  6. Brian Weatherson, Centrality and Marginalisation.
    Welcome to the history of late analytic philosophyIt’s a good time to be doing history of late analytic philosophy. There is flurry of new and exciting work on how philosophy got from the death pangs of positivism and ordinary language philosophy to where it is today. Some may see this as a much needed gap in the literature. Indeed, there are a couple of reasons for scepticism about there being such a field as history of late analytic philosophy, both of (...)
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  7. Jonathan M. Weinberg, Cappelen Between Rock and a Hard Place.
    In order for Herman Cappelen to argue in his Philosophy Without Intuitions that philosophers have been on the whole mistaken in thinking that we actually use intuitions much at all in our first-order philosophizing, he must attempt the task of characterizing what something must be, in order to be an intuition.My discussion here is focused on the latter half of the book concerning the “argument from philosophical practice. I am in wholehearted agreement with the first half’s thesis that the usage (...)
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volume 27, issue 3, 2014
  1. Peter Seipel, Philosophy, Famine Relief, and the Skeptical Challenge From Disagreement.
    Disagreement has been grist to the mills of sceptics throughout the history of philosophy. Recently, though, some philosophers have argued that widespread philosophical disagreement supports a broad scepticism about philosophy itself. In this paper, I argue that the task for sceptics of philosophy is considerably more complex than commonly thought. The mere fact that philosophical methods fail to generate true majority views is not enough to support the sceptical challenge from disagreement. To avoid demanding something that human reasoning cannot supply, (...)
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forthcoming articles
  1. Viktor Johansson, Questions From the Rough Ground: Teaching, Autobiography and the Cosmopolitan “I”.
    In this article I explore how cosmopolitanism can be a challenge for ordinary language philosophy. I also explore cosmopolitan aspects of Stanley Cavell’s ordinary language philosophy. Beginning by considering the moral aspects of cosmopolitanism and some examples of discussions of cosmopolitanism in philosophy of education, I turn to the scene of instruction in Wittgenstein and to Stanley Cavell’s emphasis on the role of autobiography in philosophy. The turn to the autobiographical dimension of ordinary language philosophy, especially its use of “I” (...)
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forthcoming articles
  1. Beth Dixon, Fables and Philosophy in Advance.
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  2. John Fantuzzo, Towards a "What-If" Class in Advance.
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forthcoming articles
  1. Melissa Moschella, Rethinking the Moral Permissibility of Gamete Donation.
    The dominant philosophical view of gamete donation as morally permissible (when practiced in the right way) rests on two premises: (1) parental obligations are triggered primarily by playing a causal role (as agent cause) in procreation, not by genetic ties, and (2) those obligations are transferable—that is, they are obligations to make adequate provision for the child’s needs, not necessarily to raise the child oneself. Thus while gamete donors are indeed agent causes of the children that their donation helps to (...)
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volume 31, issue ?, 2014
  1. Josué Gil Soldevilla, Necesidad de Gobernanza Política: La Esfera Política Como Articuladora y Garante En la Teoría Walzeriana.
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  2. Alejandro E. Nicola, ¿Presencia de Ireneo en el Comentario al Cantar de Gregorio de Nisa?
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Chapters, other
  1. DIRECT SUBMISSION
    Kelly Trogdon (forthcoming). Placement, Grounding, and Mental Content. In Chris Daly (ed.), The Palsgrave Handbook on Philosophical Methods. Palgrave Macmillan.
    One central issue concerning philosophical methodology is this: what concepts should go into our philosophical toolbox? That is to say, what notions are appropriate to rely on in doing philosophy? This issue is relevant not only to how we should go about addressing philosophical problems but also how we’re to formulate those problems in the first place. There is a burgeoning literature on the notion of grounding. I’m a proponent of grounding – I think the notion of grounding is coherent (...)
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  2. DIRECT SUBMISSION
    Scott Edgar (forthcoming). Intersubjectivity and Physical Laws in Post-Kantian Theory of Knowledge: Natorp and Cassirer. In Sebastian Luft & Tyler Friedman (eds.), The Philosophy of Ernst Cassirer: a Novel Assessment. De Gruyer.
Oct 30th 2014 GMT
forthcoming articles
  1. Roman Murawski, Cracow Circle and Its Philosophy of Logic and Mathematics.
    The paper is devoted to the presentation and analysis of the philosophical views concerning logic and mathematics of the leading members of Cracow Circle, i.e., of Jan Salamucha, Jan Franciszek Drewnowski and Józef (Innocenty) Maria Bocheński. Their views on the problem of possible applicability of logical tools in metaphysical and theological researches is also discussed.
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  2. Fernando R. Velázquez-Quesada, Reasoning Processes as Epistemic Dynamics.
    This work proposes an understanding of deductive, default and abductive reasoning as different instances of the same phenomenon: epistemic dynamics. It discusses the main intuitions behind each one of these reasoning processes, and suggest how they can be understood as different epistemic actions that modify an agent’s knowledge and/or beliefs in a different way, making formal the discussion with the use of the dynamic epistemic logic framework. The ideas in this paper put the studied processes under the same umbrella, thus (...)
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forthcoming articles
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    Sam Baron, Tensed Truthmaker Theory.
    Presentism faces a serious challenge from truthmaker theory. Standard solutions to the truthmaker objection against presentism proceed in one of two ways. Easy road presentists invoke new entities to satisfy the requirements of truthmaker theory. Hard road presentists, by contrast, flatly refuse to give in to truthmaker demands. Recently, a third way has been proposed. This response seeks to address the truthmaking problem by tensing our truthmaker principles. These views, though intuitive, are under-developed. In this paper, I get serious about (...)
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volume 17, issue 5, 2014
  1. DIRECT SUBMISSION
    Dan Demetriou, What Should Realists Say About Honor Cultures?
    Richard Nisbett and Dov Cohen’s (1996) influential account of “cultures of honor” speculates that honor norms are a socially-adaptive deterrence strategy. This theory has been appealed to by multiple empirically-minded philosophers, and plays an important role in John Doris and Alexandra Plakias’ (2008) antirealist argument from disagreement. In this essay, I raise four objections to the Nisbett-Cohen deterrence thesis, and offer another theory of honor in its place that sees honor as an agonistic normative system regulating prestige competitions. Since my (...)
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    Ezio Di Nucci, Avoiding and Alternate Possibilities.
    Greg Janzen has recently criticised my defence of Frankfurt’s counterexample to the Principle of Alternate Possibilities by arguing that Jones avoids killing Smith in the counterfactual scenario. Janzen’s argument consists in introducing a new thought-experiment which is supposed to be analogous to Frankfurt’s and where the agent is supposed to avoid A-ing. Here I argue that Janzen’s argument fails on two counts, because his new scenario is not analogous to Frankfurt’s and because the agent in his new scenario does not (...)
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  3. Juan Espindola, The Case for the Moral Permissibility of Amnesties: An Argument From Social Moral Epistemology.
    This paper makes the case for the permissibility of post-conflict amnesties, although not on prudential grounds. It argues that amnesties of a certain scope, targeted to certain categories of perpetrators, and offered in certain contexts are morally permissible because they are an acknowledgment of the difficulty of attributing criminal responsibility in mass violence contexts. Based on this idea, the paper develops the further claim that deciding which amnesties are permissible and which ones are not should be decided on a case-by-case (...)
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