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Apr 17th 2014 GMT
volume 15, issue 1, 2014
  1. Ajay Aggarwal, Joanna Davies & Richard Sullivan, "Nudge" in the Clinical Consultation - an Acceptable Form of Medical Paternalism?
    Libertarian paternalism is a concept derived from cognitive psychology and behavioural science. It is behind policies that frame information in such a way as to encourage individuals to make choices which are in their best interests, while maintaining their freedom of choice. Clinicians may view their clinical consultations as far removed from the realms of cognitive psychology but on closer examination there are a number of striking similarities.
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  1. Bridget Vincent, 'Not an Idle Spectator': Geoffrey Hill as Model Reviewer.
    Geoffrey Hill’s prose has prompted longstanding critical controversy, much of which turns on the perceived difficulty, intransigence and anachronism of his oeuvre as a whole. This paper proposes that new ways to navigate this controversy can be found in Hill’s preoccupation with the exemplary dimensions of writing – that is, in his interest in the poet’s capacity to offer examples (positive and negative) to a community of readers. The discussion pays particular attention to the connections Hill’s reviews establish between style (...)
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    Matthias Unterhuber, Do Ceteris Paribus Laws Exist? A Regularity-Based Best System Analysis.
    The paper argues that ceteris paribus (cp) laws exist, based on a Lewisian best system analysis of lawhood (BSA). Furthermore, it is shown that a BSA faces a second trivialization problem besides the one identified by Lewis. The first point concerns an argument against cp laws by Earman and Roberts. The second point aims to help making some assumptions of the BSA explicit. To address the second trivialization problem, a restriction in terms of natural logical constants is proposed that allows (...)
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volume 14, issue 8, 2013
  1. Markos Valaris, Self-Knowledge and the Phenomenological Transparency of Belief.
    I develop an account of our capacity to know what we consciously believe, which is based on an account of the phenomenology of conscious belief. While other recent authors have suggested that phenomenally conscious states play a role in the epistemology of self-ascriptions of belief, they have failed to give a satisfying account of how exactly the phenomenology is supposed to help with the epistemology — i.e., an account of the way “what it is like” for the subject of a (...)
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  1. Marie-Luisa Frick, The Cultural Defense and Women's Human Rights An Inquiry Into the Rationales for Unveiling Justitia's Eyes to 'Culture'.
    In our era of globalization, migration increasingly enforces cultural heterogeneity at the level of single societies and countries mirroring the cultural heterogeneity at the macroscopic level, i.e. the planet. Thus, the question of intercultural understanding and coexistence not only is crucial when it comes to states, but is increasingly gaining in importance in terms of identifying preconditions that enable individuals from various cultural backgrounds to share one commonwealth. At present, a growing number of people are convinced that this challenge is (...)
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  2. Øjvind Larsen, The Ethical Demand in Societal Perspective – Zygmunt Bauman's Sociological Interpretation of the Danish Philosopher K. E. Løgstrup's Moral Philosophy.
    Zygmunt Bauman’s entire body of work has been dedicated to exploring sociological issues. However, problems of moral philosophy have come to play an increasingly crucial role for his understanding of social life in later works. In particular, the Danish philosopher Knud Ejler Løgstrup’s moral philosophy has shaped Bauman’s thinking. Løgstrup argued that there is an unconditional imperative in the ethical demand to take care of the Other, and this imperative cannot be superseded, rationalized, calculated, or strategically managed. Bauman is right (...)
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  3. Andrew F. Smith, Religion in the Public Sphere Incentivizing Reciprocal Deliberative Engagement.
    Commonplace among deliberative theorists is the view that, when defending preferred laws and policies, citizens should appeal only to reasons they expect others reasonably to accept. This view has been challenged on the grounds that it places an undue burden on religious citizens who feel duty-bound to appeal to religious reasons to justify preferred positions. In response, I develop a conception of democratic deliberation that provides unlimited latitude regarding the sorts of reasons that can be introduced, so long as one (...)
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volume 20, issue 2, 2014
  1. David Casassas, Propertylessness Under Capitalist Societies.
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  2. Richard L. Lippke, Preventive Pre-Trial Detention Without Punishment.
    The pre-trial detention of individuals charged with crimes is viewed by many legal scholars as problematic. Standard arguments against it are that it constitutes legal punishment of individuals not yet convicted of crimes, violates the presumption of innocence, and rests on dubious predictions of future crime. I defend modified and restrained forms of pre-trial detention. I argue that pre-trial detention could be made very different than imprisonment, should be governed by strict criteria, and is warranted, when the evidence of danger (...)
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  3. Helen McCabe, Frederick Rosen: From Ethology to Political Economy.
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  4. George E. Panichas, An Intrusion Theory of Privacy.
    This paper offers a general theory of privacy, a theory that takes privacy to consist in being free from certain kinds of intrusions. On this understanding, privacy interests are distinct and distinguishable from those in solitude, anonymity, and property, for example, or from the fact that others possess, with neither consent nor permission, personal information about oneself. Privacy intrusions have both epistemic and psychological components, and can range in value from relatively trivial considerations to those of profound consequence for an (...)
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  5. Thomas Søbirk Petersen, Being Worse Off: But in Comparison with What? On the Baseline Problem of Harm and the Harm Principle.
    Several liberal philosophers and penal theorists have argued that the state has a reason to prohibit acts that harm individuals. But what is harm? According to one specification of harm, a person P is harmed by an act (or an event) a iff, as a result of a, P is made worse off in terms of well-being. One central question here involves the baseline against which we assess whether someone is ‘worse off’. In other words, when a person is harmed (...)
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  6. Ronen Shnayderman, Causal Tests in Subjunctive Judgements About Negative Freedom.
    This essay discusses a heretofore neglected dimension of one of the most important questions in the realm of political theory: which obstacles that stand in the way of our performing a certain action render us unfree to perform that action? This dimension is concerned with the issue of the causal test that a certain central kind of obstacle—i.e., subjunctive interference—has to pass in order to render us unfree. The aim of this essay is, first, to introduce this issue; and, second, (...)
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  7. Matt Stichter, The Structure of Death Penalty Arguments.
    In death penalty debates, advocates on both sides have advanced a staggering number of arguments to defend their positions. Many of those arguments fail to support retaining or abolishing the death penalty, and often this is due to advocates pursuing a line of reasoning where the conclusion, even if correctly established, will not ultimately prove decisive. Many of these issues are also interconnected and shouldn’t be treated separately. The goal of this paper is to provide some clarity about which specific (...)
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  8. Christine Tiefensee, Expressivism, Anti-Archimedeanism and Supervenience.
    Metaethics is traditionally understood as a non-moral discipline that examines moral judgements from a standpoint outside of ethics. This orthodox understanding has recently come under pressure from anti-Archimedeans, such as Ronald Dworkin and Matthew Kramer, who proclaim that rather than assessing morality from an external perspective, metaethical theses are themselves substantive moral claims. In this paper, I scrutinise this anti-Archimedean challenge as applied to the metaethical position of expressivism. More precisely, I examine the claim that expressivists do not avoid moral (...)
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  1. Mariarosaria Taddeo, Just Information Warfare.
    In this article I propose an ethical analysis of information warfare, the warfare waged in the cyber domain. The goal is twofold: filling the theoretical vacuum surrounding this phenomenon and providing the conceptual grounding for the definition of new ethical regulations for information warfare. I argue that Just War Theory is a necessary but not sufficient instrument for considering the ethical implications of information warfare and that a suitable ethical analysis of this kind of warfare is developed when Just War (...)
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Manuscripts
  1. Shalom Lappin, Alexander Clark & Jey Han Lau, Measuring Gradience in Speakers’ Grammaticality Judgements.
    The question of whether grammaticality is a binary categorical or a gradient property has been the subject of ongoing debate in linguistics and psychology for many years. Linguists have tended to use constructed examples to test speakers’ judgements on specific sorts of constraint violation. We applied machine translation to randomly selected subsets of the British National Corpus (BNC) to generate a large test set which contains well-formed English source sentences, and sentences that exhibit a wide variety of grammatical infelicities. We (...)
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  2. David Laverty, Luigi Vanfretti, Iyad Al-Khatib, Viktor Applegreen, Robert Best & D. John Morrow, The OpenPMU Project: Challenges and Perspectives.
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    Matthias Unterhuber, Alexander Gebharter & Gerhard Schurz, How Are You Today? Philosophy of Science in Germany, 1992-2012 – A Survey-Based Overview and a Quantitative Analysis.
    An overview of the German philosophy of science community is given for the years 1992 to 2012, based on a survey, at which 159 philosophers of science in Germany participated. To this end, the institutional back- ground of the German philosophy of science community is examined in terms of journals, centers, and associations. Furthermore, a qualitative de- scription and a quantitative analysis of our survey results are presented. Quantitative estimates are given for: (a) academic positions, (b) research foci, (c) philosophers’ (...)
     
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Chapters, other
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    Marguerite La Caze (2014). Promising and Forgiveness. In Patrick Hayden (ed.), Hannah Arendt: Key Concepts. Acumen. 209-21.
     
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Apr 16th 2014 GMT
forthcoming articles
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    Teresa Marques & Manuel García-Carpintero, Disagreement about Taste: Commonality Presuppositions and Coordination.
    The paper confronts the disagreement argument for relativism about matters of taste, defending a specific form of contextualism. It is first considered whether the disagreement data might manifest an inviariantist attitude speakers pre-reflectively have. Semantic and ontological enlightenment should then make the impressions of disagreement vanish, or at least leave them as lingering ineffectual Müller-Lyer-like illusions; but it is granted to relativists that this does not fully happen. López de Sa’s appeal to presuppositions of commonality and Sundell’s appeal to metalinguistic (...)
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volume 9, issue , 2014
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    Maximiliano Martinez & Maurizio Esposito, Multilevel Causation and the Extended Synthesis.
    In this article we argue that the classical—linear and bottom-up directed—models of causation in biology, and the ‘‘proximate/ultimate’’ dichotomy, are inappropriate to capture the complexity inherent to biological processes. We introduce a new notion of ‘‘multilevel causation’’ where old dichotomies such as proximate/ultimate and bottom-up/ top-down are reinterpreted within a multilevel, web-like, approach. In briefly reviewing some recent work on complexity, EvoDevo, carcinogenesis, autocatalysis, comparative genomics, animal regeneration, phenotypic plasticity, and niche construction, we will argue that such reinterpretation is a (...)
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volume 44, issue 1, 2014
  1. Barbara Colledge, Jamie Morgan & Ralph Tench, The Concept(s) of Trust in Late Modernity, the Relevance of Realist Social Theory.
    In this paper, we argue that trust is an important aspect of social reality, one that realist social theory has paid little attention to but which clearly resonates with a realist social ontology. Furthermore, the emergence of an interest in trust in specific subject fields such as organization theory indicates the growing significance of issues of trust as market liberalism has developed. As such, the emergence of an interest in trust provides support for Archer's characterisation of late modernity in The (...)
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