New books and articles

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Apr 30th 2016 GMT
Chapters, other
  1. Elisa Magrì (2015). L’auto-riferimento del corpo vivo Sull’abitudine in Hegel e Merleau-Ponty. In Elisa Magrì Danilo Manca (ed.), Hegel e la fenomenologia trascendentale. Edizioni ETS 81-100.
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Apr 29th 2016 GMT
forthcoming articles
  1. David Widerker, Defending Non-Causal Libertarianism.
    Non-Causal Libertarianism (NCL) is a libertarian position which aims to provide a non-causal account of action and freedom to do otherwise. NCL has been recently criticized from a number of quarters, notably from proponents of free will skepticism and agent-causation. The main complaint that has been voiced against NCL is that it does not provide a plausible account of an agent’s control over her action, and therefore, the account of free action it offers is inadequate. Some critics (mainly agent-causationists) have (...)
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forthcoming articles
  1. Adam La Caze & Mark Colyvan, A Challenge for Evidence-Based Policy.
    Evidence-based policy has support in many areas of government and in public affairs more generally. In this paper we outline what evidence-based policy is, then we discuss its strengths and weaknesses. In particular, we argue that it faces a serious challenge to provide a plausible, over-arching account of evidence. We contrast evidence-based policy with evidence-based medicine, especially the role of evidence in assessing the effectiveness of medicines. The evidence required for policy decisions does not easily lend itself to randomized controlled (...)
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  2. Harald Walach, Patrizio Tressoldi & Luciano Pederzoli, Mental, Behavioural and Physiological Nonlocal Correlations Within the Generalized Quantum Theory Framework.
    Generalized Quantum Theory seeks to explain and predict quantum-like phenomena in areas usually outside the scope of quantum physics, such as biology and psychology. It draws on fundamental theories and uses the algebraic formalism of quantum theory that is used in the study of observable physical matter such as photons, electrons, etc. In contrast to quantum theory proper, GQT is a very generalized form that does not allow for the full application of formalism. For instance neither a commutator, such as (...)
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forthcoming articles
  1. Matthew Barnard, Freedom to Fail: Heidegger’s Anarchy.
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  2. Stephen R. L. Clark, Aesthetic Themes in Pagan and Christian Neoplatonism From Plotinus to Gregory of Nyssa.
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  3. Tom Giesbers, Briefwechsel – Nachlaß – Dokumente. Briefwechsel. Reihe I: Text. Band 10: Briefwechsel Juni 1792 Bis September 1794.
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  4. Antonia LoLordo, Locke’s Touchy Subjects: Materialism and Immortality.
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  5. Charles T. Wolfe, Materialism and ‘the Soft Substance of the Brain’: Diderot and Plasticity.
    ABSTRACTMaterialism is the view that everything that is real is material or is the product of material processes. It tends to take either a ‘cosmological’ form, as a claim about the ultimate nature of the world, or a more specific ‘psychological’ form, detailing how mental processes are brain processes. I focus on the second, psychological or cerebral form of materialism. In the mid-to-late eighteenth century, the French materialist philosopher Denis Diderot was one of the first to notice that any self-respecting (...)
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volume 25, issue 2, 2016
  1. Álvaro Lleó de Nalda, Manuel Guillén & Ignacio Gil Pechuán, The Influence of Ability, Benevolence, and Integrity in Trust Between Managers and Subordinates: The Role of Ethical Reasoning.
    Numerous researchers have examined the antecedents of trust between managers and subordinates. Recent studies conclude that their influence varies depending on whether what is being examined is a manager's trust in a subordinate or a subordinate's trust in a manager. However, the reasons given to justify this phenomenon present limitations. This article offers a new theoretical approach that relates the influence of each antecedent to Aristotelian forms of reasoning, ethical, and instrumental. The proposed approach shows that the influence of each (...)
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  1. Steve Clarke, The Reversal Test, Status Quo Bias, and Opposition to Human Cognitive Enhancement.
    Bostrom and Ord’s reversal test has been appealed to by many philosophers to substantiate the charge that preferences for status quo options are motivated by status quo bias. I argue that their characterization of the reversal test needs to be modified, and that their description of the burden of proof it imposes needs to be clarified. I then argue that there is a way to meet that burden of proof which Bostrom and Ord fail to recognize. I also argue that (...)
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volume 40, issue 3, 2016
  1. Susan Wagner Cook, Howard S. Friedman, Katherine A. Duggan, Jian Cui & Voicu Popescu, Hand Gesture and Mathematics Learning: Lessons From an Avatar.
    A beneficial effect of gesture on learning has been demonstrated in multiple domains, including mathematics, science, and foreign language vocabulary. However, because gesture is known to co-vary with other non-verbal behaviors, including eye gaze and prosody along with face, lip, and body movements, it is possible the beneficial effect of gesture is instead attributable to these other behaviors. We used a computer-generated animated pedagogical agent to control both verbal and non-verbal behavior. Children viewed lessons on mathematical equivalence in which an (...)
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  2. Larissa K. Samuelson, Sarah C. Kucker & John P. Spencer, Moving Word Learning to a Novel Space: A Dynamic Systems View of Referent Selection and Retention.
    Theories of cognitive development must address both the issue of how children bring their knowledge to bear on behavior in-the-moment, and how knowledge changes over time. We argue that seeking answers to these questions requires an appreciation of the dynamic nature of the developing system in its full, reciprocal complexity. We illustrate this dynamic complexity with results from two lines of research on early word learning. The first demonstrates how the child's active engagement with objects and people supports referent selection (...)
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forthcoming articles
  1. Peter Baumann, Safety, Virtue, Scepticism: Remarks on Sosa.
    Ernest Sosa has made and continues to make major contributions to a wide variety of topics in epistemology. In this paper I discuss some of his core ideas about the nature of knowledge and scepticism. I start with a discussion of the safety account of knowledge – a view he has championed and further developed over the years. I continue with some questions concerning the role of the concept of an epistemic virtue for our understanding of knowledge. Safety and virtue (...)
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volume 9, issue 3, 2016
  1. Sally Ramage, GENETICS CRIME AND JUSTICE, EDWARD ELGAR 2015.
    The UK government decided to introduce Income Tax in 1799. Later, tax avoidance schemes involved creation of Deeds of Convenant. It is a fact that crime is increasing but the number of people committing crime is not increasing because many crimes are repeated crimes committed by persons with habitual criminal behaviour, ie hard-core criminals. -/- For more than half a century now, there has been scientific evidence that genetics plays a key role in the origins of criminal behaviour. There are (...)
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volume 23, issue 50, unknown
  1. Lina Marcela Cadavid Ramírez, Posibilidades y obstáculos de la epistemología en la comprensión de la experiencia mística.
    Podría pensarse que el discurso epistemológico no puede abordar la experiencia mística, sin embargo desde el siglo XX diversos autores se han dado a la tarea de formular modelos epistemológicos que permitan comprender el estatus epistemológico de dicha experiencia. A partir del auge de perspectivas lingüísticas y sociológicas que se apoyaron en la filosofía de Wittgenstein y en la importancia que éste dio al lenguaje, a la experiencia que en él se expresa y a la comunidad que se entiende con (...)
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volume 11, issue 1, 2016
  1.  2
    Sunaina Attard, Daniela Mercieca & Duncan P. Mercieca, Ethics in School Psychologists Report Writing: Acknowledging Aporia.
    Research in school psychologist report writing has argued for reports that connect to the client’s context; have clear links between the referral questions and the answers to these questions; have integrated interpretations; address client strengths and problem areas; have specific, concrete and feasible recommendations; and are adapted to the language and literacy level of the reader. The training of school psychologists involves attention to these factors. However, this paper argues that the experience of aporia, as described by the French philosopher (...)
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  2.  3
    Dave Chang & Heesoon Bai, Self-with-Other in Teacher Practice: A Case Study Through Care, Aristotelian Virtue, and Buddhist Ethics.
    Many teacher candidates get their first taste of life as a full-time teacher in their practicums, during which they confront a host of challenges, pedagogical and ethical. Because ethics is fundamental to the connection between teachers and students, teacher candidates are often required to negotiate dilemmas in ways that keep with the ethical ideals espoused both by the professional body and the community at large. Presenting the case of a teacher candidate who finds herself emotionally depleted in her devotion to (...)
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  3.  2
    J. T. H. Connor, Seeing Through Medical Ethics: A Request for Professional Transparency and Accountability.
    This essay is a critique of medical/clinical ethics from the personal perspective of a medical historian in an academic health science centre who has interacted with ethicists. It calls for greater transparency and accountability of ethicists involved in ‘bedside consulting;’ it questions the wisdom of the four principles of biomedical ethics and their American cultural origins with respect to training; challenges the authority of ‘core competencies’ for ethicists as identified by the American Society for Bioethics and Humanities; and muses over (...)
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  4. Christopher Martin, Education and Moral Respect for the Medical Student.
    In this paper I argue that medical education must remain attuned to the interests that physicians have in their own self-development despite ongoing calls for ethics education aimed at ensuring physicians maintain focus on the interests of the patient and society. In particular, I argue that medical education should advance criteria defining what counts as an educationally worthwhile activity from the perspective of the medical student understood as a learner. I offer a preliminary account and justification of such criteria, arguing (...)
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  5. Christopher Martin & Claudia W. Ruitenberg, Ethics in Professional Education: Introduction to the Special Issue.
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  6.  2
    Janet Orchard, Ruth Heilbronn & Carrie Winstanley, Philosophy for Teachers – Developing New Teachers’ Applied Ethical Decision-Making.
    Teaching, irrespective of its geographical location, is fundamentally a relational practice in which unique ethically complex situations arise to which teachers need to respond at different levels of ethical decision-making. These range from ‘big’ abstract questions about whether or not what they teach is inherently good, through to seemingly trivial questions about everyday issues, for example whether or not it is right to silence children in classrooms. Hence, alongside a wide range of pedagogical skills, new teachers also need to develop (...)
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  7.  3
    Claudia W. Ruitenberg, The Overlapping Spheres of Medical Professionalism and Medical Ethics: A Conceptual Inquiry.
    This essay examines the concepts of ‘professionalism’ and ‘ethics’ as they are used in health professions education and, in particular, medical education. It proposes that, in order to make sense of the construct of ‘professional ethics,’ it would be helpful to conceive of professionalism and ethics as overlapping but not identical spheres. By allowing for areas of professionalism that are not directly pertinent to ethics, and areas of ethics that are not directly pertinent to the professional sphere, ‘professional ethics’ as (...)
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  8.  3
    Cathrine Ryther, ‘I’M Not Going to Cross That Line, but How Do I Get Closer to It?’ A Hedge Fund Manager’s Perspective on the Need for Ethical Training and Theory for Finance Professionals.
    Drawing on a finance professional’s reflections on his ethical education as an economics undergraduate, Chartered Financial Analyst, and top-tier MBA graduate, this article considers the framing of, and need for philosophy in, ethical training for finance professionals. Role-playing is emphasized as helpful for developing a mature ethical approach, and theory is seen as desirable after the fact, to plan improved future action. The article problematizes an orientation in professional programs that primarily gears the teaching of ethics toward those students perceived (...)
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  9.  2
    Espen Schjetne, Hilde Wågsås Afdal, Trine Anker, Nina Johannesen & Geir Afdal, Empirical Moral Philosophy and Teacher Education.
    In this paper, we explore the possible contributions of empirical moral philosophy to professional ethics in teacher education. We argue that it is both possible and desirable to connect knowledge of how teachers empirically do and understand professional ethics with normative theories of teachers’ professional ethics. Our argument is made in dialogue with the moral philosophy of Charles Taylor and the emerging tradition of ‘empirical ethics’ in psychiatry. We also draw on empirical data from a larger empirical project on teachers’ (...)
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  10.  4
    Nicolas Tanchuk, Carly Scramstad & Marc Kruse, Toward an Ethics of Professional Understanding.
    In this paper, we advance a novel conception of normative ethics and draw out its implications within the domain of professional ethics. We argue that all moral agents, and thus professionals, share a fundamental and constitutive normative interest in correctly conceiving of their ends. All professionals, we claim, by virtue of their positions of social power, have special role responsibilities in cultivating and sustaining societies oriented by this shared ideal of practically oriented ethical understanding. We defend this conception against a (...)
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volume 37, issue 1, 2015
  1.  7
    Luca Castagnoli, Aristotle on the Non-Cause Fallacy.
    When in classical formal logic the notions of deduction, valid inference and logical consequence are defined, causal language plays no role. The founder of western logic, Aristotle, identified ‘non-cause’, or ‘positing as cause what is not a cause’, as a logical fallacy. I argue that a systematic re-examination of Aristotle's analysis of NCF, and the related language of logical causality, in the Sophistical Refutations, Topics, Analytics and Rhetoric, helps us to understand his conception of. It reveals that Aristotle's syllogismhood is (...)
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  2.  19
    David Merry, The Philosopher and the Dialectician in Aristotle's Topics.
    I claim that, in the Topics, Aristotle advises dialectical questioners to intentionally argue fallaciously in order to escape from some dialectically awkward positions, and I work through the consequences of that claim. It will turn out that, although there are important exceptions, the techniques for finding arguments described in Topics I–VII are, by and large, locations that Aristotle thought of as appropriate for use in philosophical inquiry. The text that grounds this claim, however, raises a further problem: it highlights the (...)
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  3.  7
    Carrie Swanson, Begging the Question as a Criticism of an Argument in Itself in Topics 8.11.
    At Topics 8.11 161b19–33 Aristotle lists five criticisms () which may be leveled against a dialectical argument ‘in itself’ (). The five criticisms correspond in many respects to the familiar conditions Aristotle places on syllogism and refutation. However, begging the question —the violation of the condition that the conclusion of a syllogism be something different () from the premises—seems not to appear on the list of five criticisms. That this omission is only apparent becomes clear once it is seen that (...)
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  4.  13
    Matthew Duncombe & Catarina Dutilh Novaes, Dialectic and Logic in Aristotle and His Tradition.
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volume 29, issue 1, 2016
  1. Franco Giudice, Optics in Hobbes’s Natural Philosophy.
    _ Source: _Volume 29, Issue 1, pp 86 - 102 The aim of this paper is to give an overview of the place that Hobbes assigns to optics in the context of his classification of sciences and disciplinary boundaries. To do this, I will begin with an account of Hobbes’s conception of philosophy or science, and particularly his distinction between true and hypothetical knowledge. I will also show that in his demarcation between mathematics or geometry and natural philosophy Hobbes was (...)
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  2. John Henry, Hobbes, Galileo, and the Physics of Simple Circular Motions.
    _ Source: _Volume 29, Issue 1, pp 9 - 38 Hobbes tried to develop a strict version of the mechanical philosophy, in which all physical phenomena were explained only in terms of bodies in motion, and the only forces allowed were forces of collision or impact. This ambition puts Hobbes into a select group of original thinkers, alongside Galileo, Isaac Beeckman, and Descartes. No other early modern thinkers developed a strict version of the mechanical philosophy. Natural philosophies relying solely on (...)
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  3. Douglas Jesseph, Hobbes on ‘Conatus’: A Study in the Foundations of Hobbesian Philosophy.
    _ Source: _Volume 29, Issue 1, pp 66 - 85 This paper will deal with the notion of _conatus_ and the role it plays in Hobbes’s program for natural philosophy. As defined by Hobbes, the _conatus_ of a body is essentially its instantaneous motion, and he sees this as the means to account for a variety of phenomena in both natural philosophy and mathematics. Although I foucs principally on Hobbesian physics, I will also consider the extent to which Hobbes’s account (...)
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  4. Agostino Lupoli, Optics, Simple Circular Motion and Conatus.
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  5. José Médina, Hobbes’s Geometrical Optics.
    _ Source: _Volume 29, Issue 1, pp 39 - 65 Since Euclid, optics has been considered a geometrical science, which Aristotle defines as a “mixed” mathematical science. Hobbes follows this tradition and clearly places optics among physical sciences. However, modern scholars point to a confusion between geometry and physics and do not seem to agree about the way Hobbes mixes both sciences. In this paper, I return to this alleged confusion and intend to emphasize the peculiarity of Hobbes’s geometrical optics. (...)
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volume 17, issue 2, 2016
  1. Walid Jumblatt Abdullah, Electoral Innovation in Competitive Authoritarian States: A Case for the Nominated Member of Parliament in Singapore.
    This article investigates the efficacy of a form of electoral innovation unique to the island-state of Singapore, the Nominated Member of Parliament scheme, and its impact on democratic governance, in light of the changing political landscape. A comparative perspective will be employed and broader conclusions on electoral engineering will be reached, especially for democratizing countries. Contrary to conventional scholarly wisdom, I argue that the NMP scheme can actually boost democratic representation in the country, considering the changing political landscape in the (...)
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  2. Wen-Chun Chang, Culture, Citizenship Norms, and Political Participation: Empirical Evidence From Taiwan.
    This study investigates the role of religion in shaping the norms of citizenship from a cultural perspective for an East Asian country that exhibits fundamental differences in social contexts from Western advanced democracies. Using data drawn from the Taiwan Social Change Survey, we find that the Eastern religions of Buddhism, Taoism, and Folk Religions are important for explaining the formation of the concept of being a good citizen. This study further examines the relationships between citizenship norms and various conventional and (...)
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  3. Alan Chong, An Unfinished ‘Diplomacy of Encounter’ – Asia and the West 1500–2015.
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  4. Jean-Marc Coicaud & Lynette E. Sieger, Thomas Hale, David Held, and Kevin Young, Gridlock: Why Global Cooperation Is Failing When We Need It Most, Polity Press, 2013, 1380 Pp. [REVIEW]
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  5. Ofer Feldman, Ken Kinoshita & Peter Bull, ‘Ducking and Diving’: How Political Issues Affect Equivocation in Japanese Political Interviews.
    This paper examines how Japanese leading politicians cope with the communication problems posed during televised political interviews. Based on data gathered during the year 2012 equivocation, thereby to also assess the significance of these talk shows in the broader context of political communication in Japan.
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  6. Sunil Kim, Making Policy with Bureaucrats and Experts: The Dilemma of Citizen Members in the Participatory Pension Reforms in Japan.
    Documenting how the Japanese state responded to increasing social discontent during initiation of unpopular welfare reforms, this study examines the factors that hindered the political empowerment of civil society despite the timely introduction of participatory policymaking institutions. The Japanese government opted in the early 2000s to introduce a participatory method to initiate the unpopular pension reform. Deliberation councils were established to encourage open discussions among government policymakers and committee members, including citizen representatives. The final outcomes of the deliberations, however, were (...)
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  7. Abdulai Kuyini Mohammed, Decentralization and Participation: Theory and Ghana's Evidence.
    Decentralization is predicted to increase popular participation in all processes, and especially decision-making at the local level. Through the analysis of interview data and secondary information, this claim was tested in five districts in Ghana. The evidence showed that contrary to theory, formal and informal procedures for participation are inadequate and irregular. Although the spaces for participation have been established and expanded, these are dominated by males with educated and professional backgrounds as well as the rich and influential with access (...)
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  8. Kosuke Shimizu, Linus Hagstrom Identity Change and Foreign Policy: Japan and its ‘Others’, Routledge, 166 Pp.
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  9. Yen-Chen Tang & Alex Chuan-Hsien Chang, Why Do Voters Change Their Evaluations of a President? A Taiwanese Case.
    In this paper, we analyze how citizens evaluate their president, especially focusing on why voters lower their evaluations at an individual-level perspective. We assert that citizens raise their evaluations of a new president when their expectations are met and lower their opinions when his or her performance disappoints them. Furthermore, the evaluations of the president are not only affected by a government's economic and diplomatic performance, but are also influenced by individual awareness of salient political issues, the contents of the (...)
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  10. Kiyotaka Yasui & Ryo Nakai, An Opportunity for Backing Down: Looking for an Electoral Connection to Audience Costs.
    This paper explores the time-inconsistency problem of audience costs in international disputes. The nature of democracy makes it difficult for leaders to back down from earlier diplomatic positions in an international dispute, out of fear of domestic political costs. Few studies have addressed the temporal aspect of such costs. This study argues that election timing impinges on the extent to which the audience cost mechanism works, and consequently, on state conflict behavior. While competitive elections are central to the political accountability (...)
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forthcoming articles
  1. Brian Hedden, Mental Processes and Synchronicity.
    I have advocated a time-slice-centric model of rationality, according to which there are no diachronic requirements of rationality. Podgorski challenges this picture on the grounds that temporally extended mental processes are epistemically important, rationally evaluable, and governed by diachronic requirements. I argue that the particular cases that Podgorski marshals to make his case are unconvincing, but that his general challenge might motivate countenancing rational requirements on processes like reasoning. However, so long as such diachronic requirements are merely derivative of more (...)
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  2. Jack Spencer, Disagreement and Attitudinal Relativism.
    Jacob Ross and Mark Schroeder argue that invariantist accounts of disagreement are incompatible with the phenomenon of reversibility. In this essay I develop a non-standard theory of propositional attitudes, which I call attitudinal relativism. Using the resources of attitudinal relativism, I articulate an invariantist account of disagreement that is compatible with reversibility.
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