New journal articles

From the most recently added
Jun 29th 2016 GMT
volume 8, issue 2, 2015
  1. Neil Campbell, Does Same-Level Causation Entail Downward Causation?
    I argue that Jaegwon Kim’s supervenience argument does not generalize to all special science properties by undermining his central intuition, employed in stage 1 of the argument, that there is a tension between horizontal causation and vertical determination. First, I challenge Kim’s treatment of the examples he employs to support this intuition, then I appeal to Kim’s own work on the metaphysics of explanation in order to dissipate the alleged tension.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2. Roberto Sá Pereira, Adverbial Account of Intransitive Self-Consciousness.
    This paper has two aims. First, it aims to provide an adverbial account of the idea of an intransitive self-consciousness and, second, it aims to argue in favor of this account. These aims both require a new framework that emerges from a critical review of Perry’s famous notion of the “unarticulated constituents” of propositional content. First, I aim to show that the idea of an intransitive self-consciousness can be phenomenologically described in an analogy with the adverbial theory of perception. In (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3. Roberto Sá Pereira, Relativizing the Opposition Between Content and State Nonconceptualism.
    Content nonconceptualism and State conceptualism are motivated by constraints of content-attribution that pull in opposite directions, namely, the so-called cognitive significance requirement and what I would like to call here the same representing constraint. The solution to this apparent contradiction is the rejection of the real content view and the adherence to what I call here Content-pragmatism. In CPR, “proposition” is not as real as a mental state, but rather is a term of art that semanticists use, as a matter (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
volume 1, issue ?, 2015
  1. Theodore Bach, Going Live: On the Value of a Newspaper-Centered Philosophy Seminar.
    For the last several years I have made the daily newspaper the pedagogical center piece of my philosophy seminar. This essay begins by describing the variations, themes, and logistics of this approach. The essay then offers several arguments in support of the value of this approach. The first argument references measurable indicators of success. A second argument contends that by “going live” with philosophical concepts, the newspaper-centered approach is uniquely well-positioned to motivate and excite the philosophy student. A third argument (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2. Frances Bottenberg, Power-Sharing in the Philosophy Classroom: Prospects and Pitfalls.
    Many of our students learn to approach their college education as yet another system of external control that places authority and decision-making power in the hands of others. This attitude carries consequences for young people’s growth as independent learners, critical thinkers, and participants in democratic community, which in turn has repercussions on personal, professional and political agency. One of the chief benefits to power-sharing in the philosophy classroom is that it disrupts students’ sense of passive complicity in their own schooling. (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3. Daryl Close, Teaching the PARC System of Natural Deduction.
    PARC is an "appended numeral" system of natural deduction that I learned as an undergraduate and have taught for many years. Despite its considerable pedagogical strengths, PARC appears to have never been published. The system features explicit "tracking" of premises and assumptions throughout a derivation, the collapsing of indirect proofs into conditional proofs, and a very simple set of quantificational rules without the long list of exceptions that bedevil students learning existential instantiation and universal generalization. The system can be used (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4. Emily Esch & Charles W. Wright, Introduction.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. Brett Gaul, Developing Hands-On Learning Activities for Philosophy Courses.
    Although philosophy courses are not known for hands-on learning activities in which students use, manipulate, or touch objects with their hands, there are simple hands-on activities that teachers can use to liven up their classrooms and foster active learning. In this paper I describe four activities I developed to attempt to improve student learning: GoldiLocke and the Three Buckets, The Argument From Disagreement Box, The Trolley Problem Reenactment, and The Lego Man of Theseus. I argue that such activities are effective (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6. Paul Green, How to Motivate Students: A Primer for Learner-Centered Teachers.
    Learner-centered pedagogy defines successful teaching in terms of student learning—and a necessary condition of learning is the motivation to learn. The purpose of this paper is to provide learner-centered teachers with the basic information they need in order to be able to successfully motivate their students. In particular, I focus on three beliefs that are important to students’ motivation to learn: beliefs about the subjective value of the learning goals; beliefs about their ability to achieve these goals; beliefs about how (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7. Christina Hendricks, Teaching and Learning Philosophy in the Open.
    Many teachers appreciate discussing teaching and learning with others, and participating in a community of others who are also excited about pedagogy. Many philosophy teachers find meetings such as the biannual AAPT workshop extremely valuable for this reason. But in between face-to-face meetings such as those, we can still participate in a community of teachers and learners, and even expand its borders quite widely, by engaging in activities under the general rubric of “open education.” Open education can mean many things, (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8. Leslie Miller, Philosophical Practice in the Classroom, or, How I Kill Zombies for a Living.
    After a brief introduction to Philosophical Practice, I explain why I use it in my courses and elaborate on some of the material and techniques I present to students in the hope that it helps them to become better-adjusted and happier people. As an example of the sorts of assignments I create for these courses I present a semester-long assignment called “Everyday Philosophical Practice” that is based on the practice of mindfulness and requires intentional metacognition from the students. This approach (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9. Paul G. Neiman & Linda V. Neiman, Engaging Students in Philosophy Texts.
    One of the most common and frustrating experiences for philosophy instructors is teaching students who have not read the assigned text prior to coming to class. This chapter proposes three specific strategies, supported by the literature on student learning, that encourages and enables students to read and understand assigned texts. Each strategy activates students’ prior knowledge, sets a purpose to read and uses novelty to engage students’ attention. Evidence from experience with these strategies is provided to further support their effectiveness. (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10. Kristin Schaupp, Trading in Values: Disagreement and Rationality in Teaching.
    Should we teach from a value-neutral position or should we disclose our positions when in the classroom? How should we approach disciplinary values, commitments, and procedures? Recent work in the epistemology of disagreement could have a profound impact on our response to these questions. While some contemporary epistemologists argue that it is possible to have rational disagreement between epistemic peers, many argue that such disagreement is indicative of a lack of rationality for one or both parties. Yet, if there is (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11. J. Alden Stout & Chris Weigel, Psychological Influences on Philosophical Questions: Implications for Pedagogy.
    Discoveries in social psychology pose important questions for philosophical pedagogy. For example, social psychologists have identified several error-producing biases that are commonly impediments to critical thinking. Recent evidence suggests that the most effective way of improving students’ critical thinking is to address these biases explicitly and metacognitively. Biases that produce errors in thinking are not the only psychological features relevant to philosophical pedagogy. Additionally, experimental philosophers have applied the methods of social psychology to uncover various influences on philosophical intuitions. This (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12. Kimberly Van Orman, Teaching Philosophy with Team-Based Learning.
    Team-Based Learning is a comprehensive approach to using groups purposefully and effectively. Because of its focus on decision making, it is well suited to helping students learn to do philosophy and not simply talk about it. Much like the “flipped classroom” approach, it is structured so that students are held responsible for “covering content” through the reading outside of class so that class meeting times can be spent practicing philosophical decisions, allowing for frequent feedback from the professor. This chapter discusses (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13. Christine Wieseler, Thinking Critically About Disability in Biomedical Ethics Courses.
    Several studies have shown that nondisabled people—especially healthcare professionals—tend to judge the quality of life of disabled people to be much lower than disabled people themselves report. In part, this is due to dominant narratives about disability. Teachers of biomedical ethics courses have the opportunity to help students to think critically about disability. This may involve interrogating our own assumptions, given the pervasiveness of ableism. This article is intended to facilitate reflection on narratives about disability. After discussing two readings that (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14. Andrew M. Winters, Some Benefits of Getting It Wrong: Guided Unsuccessful Retrievals and Long-Term Understanding.
    What might be called the “common approach” to teaching incorporates traditional retrieval exercises, such as tests and quizzes, as tools for evaluating retention. Given our course goals, many educators would recognize that the emphasis on retention is problematic. In addition to understanding information in the short-term, long-term understanding is also desirable. In this paper, I advocate for a new use of quizzes in philosophy courses that is intentionally designed to enhance long-term understanding of course material as well as to develop (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15. Jessey Wright, Course Participation: Defining and Evaluating Student Participation.
    In this article, I will show that a general and inclusive model for participation is one that includes: explaining to students what participation is; explaining why it is important to participate; providing a list of modes of participation; and methods for encouraging students to identify and pursue the modes that suit their individual needs and circumstances. The article concludes by outlining a self-assessment assignment for evaluating course participation that satisfies this model.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
forthcoming articles
  1. Paul Guyer, Art and Ethics in a Material World: Kant’s Pragmatist Legacy.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
volume 23, issue 2, 2016
  1. Amy Allen, Psychoanalysis and the Methodology of Critique.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2. Nicolai Eggers, When the People Assemble, the Laws Go Silent – Radical Democracy and the French Revolution.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3. Federico Finchelstein, Truth, Mythology and the Fascist Unconscious.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4. Todd Hedrick, Ego Autonomy, Reconciliation, and the Duality of Instinctual Nature in Adorno and Marcuse.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. Axel Honneth & Joel Whitebook, Omnipotence or Fusion? A Conversation Between Axel Honneth and Joel Whitebook.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6. Robyn Marasco, Toward A Critique of Conspiratorial Reason.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7. Jack Reilly, The Sovereign Wears No Clothes! Defrocking Carl Schmitt's Political Theology.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8. Paul Rekret & Simon Choat, From Political Topographies to Political Logics: Post‐Marxism and Historicity.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9. Camille Robcis, François Tosquelles and the Psychiatric Revolution in Postwar France.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10. Mari Ruti, Why Some Things Matter More Than Others: A Lacanian Explanation.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11. Benjamin A. Schupmann, Carl Schmitt: A Biography. By Reinhard Mehring.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12. Christian Volk, Sovereignty. The Origin and Future of a Political and Legal Concept. By Dieter Grimm.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13. Jeremy Waldron, Death Squads and Death Lists: Targeted Killing and the Character of the State.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14. Jamieson Webster, Dreaming in Exile or the Exile of Dreams.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15. Yves Winter, The Siege of Gaza: Spatial Violence, Humanitarian Strategies, and the Biopolitics of Punishment.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
volume 38, issue 1, 2016
  1. Melissa Clarke, Earth Stewardship: Linking Ecology and Ethics in Theory and Practice.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2. Willis Jenkins, The Turn to Virtue in Climate Ethics.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3. Nin Kirkham, Recognizing Our Place in the World.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4. Mei-Hsiang Lin, Traditional Chinese Confucianism and Taoism and Current Environmental Education.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. Tony Lynch & Stephen Norris, On the Enduring Importance of Deep Ecology.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6. Dale E. Miller, Mill’s “Nature”.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7. Jonathan Parker, Stoic Quietude.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8. Frank Schalow, The Logos of the Living World: Merleau-Ponty, Animals, and Language.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9. David E. Storey, Nietzsche and Ecology Revisited.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
forthcoming articles
  1. Anne Schwenkenbecher, What is Wrong with NIMBYs? Renewable Energy, Landscape Impacts and Incommensurable Values.
    Local opposition to infrastructure projects implementing renewable energy (RE) such as wind farms is often strong even if state-wide support for RE is strikingly high. The slogan “Not In My BackYard” (NIMBY) has become synonymous for this kind of protest. This paper revisits the question of what is wrong with NIMBYs about RE projects and how to best address them. I will argue that local opponents to wind farm (and other RE) developments do not necessarily fail to contribute their fair (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
forthcoming articles
  1. Francis Cheneval & Kalypso Nicolaidis, The Social Construction of Demoicracy in the European Union.
    The Eurozone crisis has brought the imperative of democratic autonomy within the EU to the forefront, a concern at the core of demoicratic theory. The article seeks to move the scholarship on demoicratic theory a step further by exploring what we call the social construction of demoicratic reality. While the EU’s legal-institutional infrastructure may imperfectly approximate a demoicratic structure, we need ask to what extent the ‘bare bones’ demoicratic character of a polity can actually be grounded in a full-flesh social (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
forthcoming articles
  1. Ruth Boeker, Locke and Hume on Personal Identity: Moral and Religious Differences.
    Hume’s theory of personal identity is developed in response to Locke’s account of personal identity. Yet it is striking that Hume does not emphasize Locke’s distinction between persons and human beings. It seems even more striking that Hume’s account of the self in Books 2 and 3 of the Treatise has less scope for distinguishing persons from human beings than his account in Book 1. This is puzzling, because Locke originally introduced the distinction in order to answer questions of moral (...)
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
volume 7, issue 1, 2016
  1. Pablo Aguayo Westwood, La Crítica de Rawls Al Utilitarismo a la Luz de Las Nociones de Autorrespeto y Reconocimiento Recíproco.
    Este artículo aborda la crítica que Rawls presentó al utilitarismo en el marco de la discusión sobre el fundamento moral de los principios de justicia que deben organizar una sociedad democrática. Se muestra que el principio de utilidad carece de las constricciones morales necesarias para garantizar tanto un efectivo reconocimiento entre las personas, así como una equitativa distribución de las bases sociales del autorrespeto. Se presentan los argumentos de Rawls en contra del utilitarismo clásico en dos grupos: primero aquellos que (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2. Gaetano Chiurazzi, Verdad Extrametódica y Ontología de la Praxis: La Racionalidad Mediadora de la Phrónesis.
    La defensa gadameriana del carácter extra-metódico de la verdad de las ciencias humanas, teorizada en Verdad y método, no es el simple rechazo del método; ella nace de la conciencia de que hay verdades que no pueden ser reducibles a las condiciones del método, porque se refieren a una dimensión ontológica que no se refiere a la repetitividad y a la conmensurabilidad. Tales aspectos de lo real son los acontecimientos contingentes, accidentales, aquellos que definimos como propiamente históricos. En este texto (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 1945