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Jan 31st 2015 GMT
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  1. Daniel J. Hicks, On Okin's Critique of Libertarianism.
    Susan Moller Okin's critique of libertarianism in Justice, Gender, and the Family has received only slight attention in the libertarian literature. I find this neglect of Okin's argument surprising: The argument is straightforward and, if sound, it establishes a devastating conflict between the core libertarian notions of self-ownership and the acquisition of property through labour. In this paper, I first present a reconstruction of Okin's argument. In brief, she points out that mothers make children through their labour; thus it would (...)
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  1. Robert Knowles, Heavy Duty Platonism.
    Heavy duty platonism is of great dialectical importance in the philosophy of mathematics. It is the view that physical magnitudes, such as mass and temperature, are cases of physical objects being related to numbers. Many theorists have assumed HDP’s falsity in order to reach their own conclusions, but they are only justified in doing so if there are good arguments against HDP. In this paper, I present all five arguments against HDP alluded to in the literature and show that they (...)
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    Luca Malatesti, Psychopathy and Failures of Ordinary Doing.
    One of the philosophical discussions stimulated by the recent scientific study of psychopathy concerns the mental illness status of this construct. This paper contributes to this debate by recommending a way of approaching the problem at issue. By relying on and integrating the seminal work of the philosopher of psychiatry Bill Fulford, I argue that a mental illness is a harmful unified construct that involves failures of ordinary doing. Central to the present proposal is the idea that the notion of (...)
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  1. Philip R. Shields, The Poverty of Patriarchal Power in Advance.
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  1. Patricia Greenspan, Confabulating the Truth: In Defense of “Defensive” Moral Reasoning.
    Empirically minded philosophers have raised questions about judgments and theories based on moral intuitions such as Rawls’s method of reflective equilibrium. But they work from the notion of intuitions assumed in empirical work, according to which intuitions are immediate assessments, as in psychologist Jonathan Haidt’s definition. Haidt himself regards such intuitions as an appropriate basis for moral judgment, arguing that normal agents do not reason prior to forming a judgment and afterwards just “confabulate” reasons in its defense. I argue, first, (...)
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  2. Duncan Purves, Torture and Incoherence: A Reply to Cyr.
    John Martin Fischer and Anthony L. Brueckner have argued that a person’s death is, in many cases, bad for him, whereas a person’s prenatal non-existence is not bad for him. Their suggestion relies on the idea that death deprives the person of pleasant experiences that it is rational for him to care about, whereas prenatal non-existence only deprives him of pleasant experiences that it is not rational for him to care about. Jens Johansson has objected to this justification of ‘The (...)
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  3. Jeremy Williams, Public Reason and Prenatal Moral Status.
    This paper provides a new analysis and critique of Rawlsian public reason’s handling of the abortion question. It is often claimed that public reason is indeterminate on abortion, because it cannot say enough about prenatal moral status, or give content to the political value which Rawls calls ‘respect for human life’. I argue that public reason requires much greater argumentative restraint from citizens debating abortion than critics have acknowledged. Beyond the preliminary observation that fetuses do not meet the criteria of (...)
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  1. Nicky Kroll, Progressive Teleology.
    I argue for a teleological account of events in progress. Details aside, the proposal is that events in progress are teleological processes. It follows from this proposal that final causes are ubiquitous: anything happening at any time is an event with a telos.
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  2. Samuel Lebens, Would This Paper Exist If I Hadn’T Written It?
    This paper wants to know whether it would exist, or could exist, in worlds in which I didn't write it. Before we can answer this question, we first of all have to inquire as to what, exactly, this paper is. After exploring two forms of Platonism , and a theory that defines literary works in terms of events, I shall argue that the term ‘this paper’ is actually infected with ambiguity. Does this paper need me? It depends upon what you (...)
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  3. Elinor Mason, Moral Ignorance and Blameworthiness.
    In this paper I discuss various hard cases that an account of moral ignorance should be able to deal with: ancient slave holders, Susan Wolf’s JoJo, psychopaths such as Robert Harris, and finally, moral outliers . All these agents are ignorant, but it is not at all clear that they are blameless on account of their ignorance. I argue that the discussion of this issue in recent literature has missed the complexities of these cases by focusing on the question of (...)
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  4. Paulina Sliwa & Sophie Horowitz, Respecting All the Evidence.
    Plausibly, you should believe what your total evidence supports. But cases of misleading higher-order evidence—evidence about what your evidence supports—present a challenge to this thought. In such cases, taking both first-order and higher-order evidence at face value leads to a seemingly irrational incoherence between one’s first-order and higher-order attitudes: you will believe P, but also believe that your evidence doesn’t support P. To avoid sanctioning tension between epistemic levels, some authors have abandoned the thought that both first-order and higher-order evidence (...)
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volume 2015, issue 203, 2015
  1. Jan Blommaert & Piia Varis, Culture as Accent: The Cultural Logic of Hijabistas.
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  2. T. Enikő Németh, The Role of Perspectives in Various Forms of Language Use.
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  3. Paja Faudree, Why X Doesn’T Always Mark the Spot: Contested Authenticity in Mexican Indigenous Language Politics.
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  4. Márta Horváth, Authorial Intention and Global Coherence in Fictional Text Comprehension: A Cognitive Approach.
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  5. Zsuzsa Simonffy, From Trace to Topical Field: Toward a Linguistic Definition of Point of View.
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  6. Benjamin Smith, The Semiotics and Politics of “Real Selfhood” in the American Therapeutic Discourse of the World War II Era.
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  7. Erzsébet Szabó, Why Do We Accept a Narrative Discourse Ascribed to a “Third-Person Narrator” as True? The Classical, and a Cognitive Approach.
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  8. Szilárd Tátrai, Context-Dependent Vantage Points in Literary Narratives: A Functional Cognitive Approach.
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  9. Zoltán Vecsey, Indexicals, Fiction, and Perspective.
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  10. Zoltán Vecsey, Introduction: Linguistic and Literary Aspects of Perspectivity.
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  11. Xuan Wang, Inauthentic Authenticity: Semiotic Design and Globalization in the Margins of China.
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  12. James M. Wilce & Janina Fenigsen, Introduction: De-Essentializing Authenticity: A Semiotic Approach.
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  1. Adam Green, The Mindreading Debate and the Cognitive Science of Religion.
    The relationship between understanding other natural minds, often labeled ‘mindreading,’ and putative understanding of the supernatural is a critical one for the dialogue centering on the cognitive science of religion . A basic tenet of much of CSR is that cognitive mechanisms that typically operate in the ‘natural’ domain are co-opted so as to generate representations of the extra-natural. The most important mechanisms invoked are, arguably, the ones that detect agency, represent actions, predicate beliefs and desires of others, and track (...)
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  2. Christopher H. Pearson & Matthew P. Schunke, Reduction, Explanation, and the New Science of Religion.
    In this essay, we set out to survey and critically assess various attitudes and understandings of reductionism as it appears in discussions regarding the scientific study of religion. Our objective in the essay is twofold. First, we articulate what we will refer to as three ‘meta-interpretative’ frameworks, which summarize the distinct positions one can witness in response to the explanations coming out of research within the new science of religion. Second, and more importantly, we seek to demonstrate that under no (...)
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  3. Hollis Phelps, Absolute Power and Contingency: On the Theological Structure of Meillassoux’s Speculative Philosophy.
    Although Quentin Meillassoux’s philosophy desires to be postmetaphysical and posttheological, I argue in this paper that it remains structurally theological. Specifically, I argue that Meillassoux’s speculative thesis on the contingency of nature and its laws repeats at a formal level the medieval theological distinction between God’s absolute power and God’s ordained power. The first part of this paper discusses how this distinction allowed medieval theologians such as Thomas Aquinas and Duns Scotus to understand and have faith in the stable contingency (...)
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  1. Albert J. J. Anglberger & Jonathan Lukic, Hilbert-Style Axiom Systems for the Matrix-Based Logics RMQ − and RMQ.
    This paper deals with the axiomatizability problem for the matrix-based logics RMQ − and RMQ *. We present a Hilbert-style axiom system for RMQ −, and a quasi-axiomatization based on it for RMQ *. We further compare these logics to different well-known modal logics, and assess its status as relevance logics.
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  1. Michelle Forrest, Sonorous Voice and Feminist Teaching: Lessons From Cavarero.
    I claim that Adriana Cavarero’s concept of sonorous voice is significant in feminist teaching because, as she argues, dominant concepts of voice refer to voice in semantic terms thereby discounting voice in sonorous terms. This process of ‘devocalization’, spanning the history of Western philosophy, devalues the uniqueness embodied in each sonorous voice effecting a bias against female-sounding voices. In light of women’s history and experience of being silenced, this devaluing of sonorous voice has distinct implications for feminist teaching. A person’s (...)
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  1. Hanna M. Van Loo & Jan-Willem Romeijn, Psychiatric Comorbidity: Fact or Artifact?
    The frequent occurrence of comorbidity has brought about an extensive theoretical debate in psychiatry. Why are the rates of psychiatric comorbidity so high and what are their implications for the ontological and epistemological status of comorbid psychiatric diseases? Current explanations focus either on classification choices or on causal ties between disorders. Based on empirical and philosophical arguments, we propose a conventionalist interpretation of psychiatric comorbidity instead. We argue that a conventionalist approach fits well with research and clinical practice and resolves (...)
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Jan 30th 2015 GMT
volume 55, issue 4, 2015
  1. Patrick Toner, St. Thomas Aquinas on Gappy Existence.
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volume 93, issue 1, 2014
  1. Patrick Allo, Synonymy and Intra-Theoretical Pluralism.
    The starting point of this paper is a version of intra-theoretical pluralism that was recently proposed by Hjortland [2013]. In a first move, I use synonymy-relations to formulate an intuitively compelling objection against Hjortland's claim that, if one uses a single calculus to characterise the consequence relations of the paraconsistent logic LP and the paracomplete logic K3, one immediately obtains multiple consequence relations for a single language and hence a reply to the Quinean charge of meaning variance. In a second (...)
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  2. Cristina Borgoni, Debating Self-Knowledge, by Anthony Brueckner and Gary Ebbs.
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  3. Brady Bowman, The Romantic Absolute: Being and Knowing in Early German Romantic Philosophy, 1795–1804, by Dalia Nassar.
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  4. John P. Burgess, New Foundations for Physical Geometry: The Theory of Linear Structures, by Tim Maudlin.
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  5. A. B. Dickerson, A World Without Why, by Raymond Geuss.
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  6. Mehmet Elgin & Elliott Sober, Causal, A Priori True, and Explanatory: A Reply to Lange and Rosenberg.
    Sober [2011] argues that some causal statements are a priori true and that a priori causal truths are central to explanations in the theory of natural selection. Lange and Rosenberg [2011] criticize Sober's argument. They concede that there are a priori causal truths, but maintain that those truths are only ‘minimally causal’. They also argue that explanations that are built around a priori causal truths are not causal explanations, properly speaking. Here we criticize both of Lange and Rosenberg's claims.
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  7. Peter Forrest, Philosophy and the Study of Religions: A Manifesto, by Kevin Schilbrack.
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  8. Michael Garnett, Autonomy as Social Independence: Reply to Weimer.
    I defend my pure social account of global autonomy from Steven Weimer's recent criticisms. In particular, I argue that it does not implicitly rely upon the very kind of nonsocial conception of autonomy that it hopes to replace.
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  9. Boris Hennig, Instance Is the Converse of Aspect.
    According to the aspect theory of instantiation, a particular A instantiates a universal B if and only if an aspect of A is cross-count identical with an aspect of B. This involves the assumption that both particulars and universals have aspects, and that aspects can mediate between different ways of counting things. I will ask what is new about this account of instantiation and, more importantly, whether it is an improvement on its older relatives. It will turn out that the (...)
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  10. Lloyd Humberstone, Plural Logic, by Alex Oliver and Timothy Smiley.
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  11. Sebastian Köhler, What is the Problem with Fundamental Moral Error?
    Quasi-realists argue that meta-ethical expressivism is fully compatible with the central assumptions underlying ordinary moral practice. In a recent paper, Andy Egan has developed a vexing challenge for this project, arguing that expressivism is incompatible with central assumptions about error in moral judgments. In response, Simon Blackburn has argued that Egan's challenge fails, because Egan reads the expressivist as giving an account of moral error, rather than an account of judgments about moral error. In this paper I argue that the (...)
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  12. Frederick Kroon, The Nonexistent, by Anthony Everett.
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  13. David Liebesman, We Do Not Count by Identity.
    It is widely assumed in psychology, philosophy, and linguistics that we count by identity. For example, to count the dogs by identity, we correlate each dog that isn't identical to the rest with a natural number, starting with one and assigning each successive dog the successive natural number. When we run out of distinct dogs, we've yielded a correct count. I argue that this model of counting is incorrect. We do not count by identity.
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  14. David Macarthur, Possibilities of Perception by Jennifer Church.
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  15. Raamy Majeed, The Objects of Thought, by Tim Crane.
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