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May 3rd 2016 GMT
Manuscripts
  1. Keith Hyams, On the Contribution of Ex Ante Equality to Ex Post Fairness.
    When distributing an indivisible harm or benefit between multiple individuals, all of whom have an equal claim to avoid the harm or receive the benefit, it is commonly thought that one should hold a lottery in order to give each claimant an equal chance of winning. Moreover, it is often said that, by holding a lottery, one makes the resultant outcome inequality between those who receive the harm or benefit and those who do not less unfair than it would otherwise (...)
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  2. Toby Meadows, Naive Infinitism : The Case for an Inconsistency Approach to Infinite Collections.
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  3. Luca Moretti & Patrick Girard, Antirealism and the Conditional Fallacy : The Semantic Approach.
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  4. Fabienne Peter, Review of A Companion to Rawls by Mandle, Jon and Reidy, David A. [REVIEW]
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  5. Stephan Torre, Restricted Diachronic Composition and Special Relativity.
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  6. Emar Maier, The Pragmatics of Attraction: Explaining Unquotation in Direct and Free Indirect Discourse.
    The quotational theory of free indirect discourse postulates that pronouns and tenses are systematically unquoted. But where does this unquotation come from? Based on cases of apparent unquotation in direct discourse constructions (including data from Kwaza speakers, Catalan signers, and Dutch children), I suggest a general pragmatic answer: unquotation is essentially a way to resolve a conflict that arises between two opposing constraints. On the one hand, the reporter wants to use indexicals that refer directly to the most salient speech (...)
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May 2nd 2016 GMT
Manuscripts
  1.  3
    Contzen Pereira, On Science & Phenomenology in Consciousness Studies.
    Everything around seems phenomenal and appears driven by a conscious experience. Everything is an experience and for the experiencer appears eternally phenomenal and subjective. The conscious ‘How’ can be easily explained by the many reductive based advances in science and other disciplines, but the conscious ‘Why’ persists as phenomenal. The ‘How’ however can be reduced only to a precise limit i.e. the limits of scientific exploration, beyond which it persists to be phenomenal. This paper is an inter-disciplinary understanding of how (...)
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  2.  3
    Richard Oxenberg, On the Mystical Element in Moral Offense: An Existential Inquiry.
    Moral violation often takes the form of material harm, which might lead us to suppose that it consists essentially in the harm done. And yet we might suffer the same harm through nature or accident without feeling morally offended. If I lose my property through accident, I suffer harm but no offense. If someone maliciously destroys my property, I am offended. But why? Wherein lies the difference? My essay employs Arthur Schopenhauer’s ethic of egoism and Paul Tillich’s theology of love (...)
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Apr 30th 2016 GMT
Manuscripts
  1.  4
    Johannes Himmelreich, Agency as Difference-Making: Causal Foundations of Moral Responsibility.
    We are responsible for some things but not for others. In this thesis, I investigate what it takes for an entity to be responsible for something. This question has two components: agents and actions. I argue for a permissive view about agents. Entities such as groups or artificially intelligent systems may be agents in the sense required for responsibility. With respect to actions, I argue for a causal view. The relation in virtue of which agents are responsible for actions is (...)
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  2.  1
    Damien Shortt, Paul Reynolds, Mary McAteer & Fiona Hallett, To Believe, To Think, To Know…To Teach? Ethical Deliberation in Teacher-Education.
    Part 1 What Do Teachers Need to Know? Part 2 What Makes a Good Teacher? Part 3 Being a Teacher?
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Apr 29th 2016 GMT
Manuscripts
  1.  1
    M. Addis, Peter D. Sozou, F. Gobet & Philip R. Lane, Computational Scientific Discovery and Cognitive Science Theories.
    This study is concerned with processes for discovering new theories in science. It considers a computational approach to scientific discovery, as applied to the discovery of theories in cognitive science. The approach combines two ideas. First, a process-based scientific theory can be represented as a computer program. Second, an evolutionary computational method, genetic programming, allows computer programs to be improved through a process of computational trialand-error. Putting these two ideas together leads to a system that can automatically generate and improve (...)
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  2.  2
    Andrew Buskell, Cultural Longevity: Morin on Cultural Lineages.
    Morin has written a rich and valuable book. Its main aim is to isolate the factors involved in maintaining behavioural lineages over time, and to understand how these factors might interact. In doing so, it takes issue with the abstract and idealised models and arguments of dual-inheritance theorists, which are alleged in this account to rely on an overly simplistic notion of imitative learning. Morin’s book is full of ethnographic, anthropological, and psychological research, and there is much to commend in (...)
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  3.  5
    Filippo Casati & Naoya Fujikawa, Nonexistent Objects as Truth-Makers : Against Crane's Reductionism.
    According to Meinongianism, some objects do not exist but we can legitimately refer to and quantify over them. Moreover, Meinongianism standardly regards nonexistent objects as contributing to the truth-makers of sentences about nonexistent objects. Recently, Tim Crane has proposed a weak form of Meinongianism, a reductionism, which denies any contribution of nonexistent objects to truth-making. His reductionism claims that, even though we can truly talk about nonexistent objects by using singular terms and quantifiers about them, any truth about nonexistent objects (...)
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  4.  6
    Ben Colburn, Methods in Ethics: Introduction.
    The Aristotelian Society’s Virtual Issue is a free, online publication, made publically available on the Aristotelian Society website. Each volume is theme-based, collecting together papers from the archives of the Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society and the Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume that address the chosen theme. This year's Virtual Issue includes a selection of papers from across the Society’s fourteen decades, each accompanied by a specially commissioned present-day response. The aim of the volume is to aid reflection (...)
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  5.  1
    Arno Frigg & Roman Frigg, The Influence of Footwear on Functional Outcome After Total Ankle Replacement, Ankle Arthrodesis, and Tibiotalocalcaneal Arthrodesis.
    Background: Gait analysis after total ankle replacement and ankle arthrodesis is usually measured barefoot. However, this does not reflect reality. The purpose of this study was to compare patients barefoot and with footwear. Methods: We compared 126 patients with 35 healthy controls in three conditions. Minimum follow-up was 2 years. We used dynamic pedobarography and a light gate. Main outcome measures: relative midfoot index, forefoot maximal force, walking speed. Findings: The relative midfoot index decreased in all groups from barefoot to (...)
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  6.  3
    Uri D. Leibowitz, Moral Deliberation and Ad Hominem Fallacies.
    Many of us read Peter Singer’s work on our obligations to those in desperate need with our students. Famously, Singer argues that we have a moral obligation to give a significant portion of our assets to famine relief. If my own experience is not atypical, it is quite common for students, upon grasping the implications of Singer’s argument, to ask whether Singer gives to famine relief. In response it might be tempting to remind students of the ad hominem fallacy of (...)
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  7.  2
    Miklós Rédei & Zalán Gyenis, Measure Theoretic Analysis of Consistency of the Principal Principle.
    Weak and strong consistency of thePrincipal Principle are defined in terms of classical probability measure spaces. It is proved that the Abstract Principal Principle is both weakly and strongly consistent. The Abstract Principal Principle is strengthened by adding a stability requirement to it. Weak and strong consistency of the resulting Stable Abstract Principal Principle are defined. It is shown that the Stable Abstract Principal Principle is weakly consistent. Strong consistency of the Stable Abstract Principal principle remains an open question.
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  8. Imran Aijaz, Jonathan McKeown-Green & Aness Webster, Burdens of Proof and the Case for Unevenness.
    How is the burden of proof to be distributed among individuals who are involved in resolving a particular issue? Under what conditions should the burden of proof be distributed unevenly? We distinguish attitudinal from dialectical burdens and argue that these questions should be answered differently, depending on which is in play. One has an attitudinal burden with respect to some proposition when one is required to possess sufficient evidence for it. One has a dialectical burden with respect to some proposition (...)
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  9.  2
    Jonathan McKeown-Green, Glen Pettigrove & Aness Webster, Conjuring Ethics From Words.
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Apr 28th 2016 GMT
New books
  1. Dietmar Heidemann (2015). Kant-Lexikon. De Gruyter.
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  2. Luca Gili & Marco Sgarbi (eds.) (forthcoming). The Aftermath of Syllogism. Bloomsbury.
     
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Manuscripts
  1.  2
    Christopher Gibilisco, Theories of Properties and Ontological Theory-Choice: An Essay in Metaontology.
    This dissertation argues that we have no good reason to accept any one theory of properties as correct. To show this, I present three possible bases for theory-choice in the properties debate: coherence, explanatory adequacy, and explanatory value. Then I argue that none of these bases resolve the underdetermination of our choice between theories of properties. First, I argue considerations about coherence cannot resolve the underdetermination, because no traditional theory of properties is obviously incoherent. Second, I argue considerations of explanatory (...)
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  2.  3
    Christian List, Levels: Descriptive, Explanatory, and Ontological.
    Scientists and philosophers frequently speak about levels of description, levels of explanation, and ontological levels. This paper presents a framework for studying levels. I give a general definition of a system of levels and discuss several applications, some of which refer to descriptive or explanatory levels while others refer to ontological levels. I illustrate the usefulness of this framework by bringing it to bear on some familiar philosophical questions. Is there a hierarchy of levels, with a fundamental level at the (...)
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  3.  1
    Roberta L. Millstein, Thinking About Populations and Races in Time.
    Biologists and philosophers have offered differing concepts of biological race. That is, they have offered different candidates for what a biological correlate of race might be; for example, races might be subspecies, clades, lineages, ecotypes, or genetic clusters. One thing that is striking about each of these proposals is that they all depend on a concept of population. Indeed, some authors have explicitly characterized races in terms of populations. However, including the concept of population into concepts of race raises three (...)
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  4.  3
    John D. Norton, A Demonstration of the Incompleteness of Calculi of Inductive Inference.
    A complete calculus of inductive inference captures the totality of facts about inductive support within some domain of propositions as relations or theorems within the calculus. It is demonstrated that there can be no complete, non-trivial calculus of inductive inference.
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  5.  2
    Murali Ramachandran, A Neglected Response to the Paradoxes of Confirmation.
    Hempel‘s paradox of the ravens, and his take on it, are meant to be understood as being restricted to situations where we have no additional background information. According to him, in the absence of any such information, observations of FGs confirm the hypothesis that all Fs are G. In this paper I argue against this principle by way of considering two other paradoxes of confirmation, Goodman‘s 'grue‘ paradox and the 'tacking‘ (or 'irrelevant conjunct‘) paradox. What these paradoxes reveal, I argue, (...)
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Apr 27th 2016 GMT
Manuscripts
  1.  2
    Keith Ansell-Pearson, Beyond Selfishness : Epicurean Ethics in Nietzsche and Guyau.
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  2.  5
    Rafael Ferber, Key Concepts in Philosophy: An Introduction.
    The book is an English translation with revisions and updates of the "Philosophische Grundbegriffe 1" and provides an introduction to six key concepts in philosophy: philosophy, language, knowledge, truth, being and good. At the same time, it aims to initiate its readers into the process of philosophical thinking. The book is addressed to students and laypeople, but also contains new ideas for specialists. It is written in a clear, accessible and engaging style, and its author 'shares, and manages to convey, (...)
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  3.  1
    G. Gooday, Ethnicity, Expertise and Authority: The Cases of Lewis Howard Latimer, William Preece and John Tyndall.
    To become an authority figure in late nineteenth century electricity, neither a higher education nor mainstream ethnic identity were necessary. This paper examines three diverse examples of Anglo-American experts/authorities who succeeded during their lifetime in at least some level of major recognition by performing publicly in the role of expert or authority figure: the African American Lewis Howard Latimer; the Welshman William Preece, and the Irishman John Tyndall. In the USA the outstanding example Latimer was the first son of a (...)
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  4.  3
    Jonathan Head, Anna Tomaschewska, Jochen Bojanowski, Alberto Vanzo & Sorin Baiasu, Introduction : Kant and Sartre – Existentialism and Critical Philosophy.
    Kant and Sartre are two of the most significant figures in modern philosophy, and yet there has, until very recently, been little comparative research undertaken on them. Despite dealing with many shared philosophical issues, they have traditionally been taken to be too opposed to each other to render any search for possible parallels between their works a useful enterprise. Indeed, Sartre is often taken to be one of Kant’s most vocal critics in the literature, and as rather indebted to other (...)
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  5.  1
    Keith Hyams, Hypothetical Choice, Egalitarianism and the Separateness of Persons.
    Luck egalitarians claim that disadvantage is worse when it emerges from an unchosen risk than when it emerges from a chosen risk. I argue that disadvantage is also worse when it emerges from an unchosen risk that the disadvantaged agent would have declined to take, had he or she been able to do so, than when it emerges from an unchosen risk that the disadvantaged agent would not have declined to take. Such a view is significant because it allows both (...)
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  6.  4
    Federico Luzzi, What Does Knowledge-Yielding Deduction Require of Its Premises?
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  7.  3
    A. Perez Carballo & P. Santorio, Communication for Expressivists.
    How can expressivists make sense of the practice of communication? If communication is not a joint enterprise aimed at sharing information about the world, why do we engage in communication the way we do? Call this the problem of communication. Starting from basic assumptions about the rationality of speakers and the nature of assertion, we argue that speakers engaging in conversation about normative matters must presuppose that there is a unique normative standard on which the attitudes of conversational participants ought (...)
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  8.  1
    Shalini Sinha, The Metaphysics of Self in Praśastapāda's Differential Naturalism.
    In A Compendium of the Characteristics of Categories the classical Vaiśeṣika philosopher Praśastapāda presents an innovative metaphysics of the self. This article examines the defining metaphysical and axiological features of this conception of self and the dualist categorial schema in which it is located. It shows how this idea of the self, as a reflexive and ethical being, grounds a multinaturalist view of natural order and offers a conception of agency that claims to account for all the reflexive features of (...)
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  9.  3
    Paula Sweeney, Contextualism and the Principle of Tolerance.
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  10.  1
    Alberto Vanzo, Christian Wolff and Experimental Philosophy.
    This chapter discusses the relation between Christian Wolff's philosophy and the methodological views of early modern experimental philosophers. The chapter argues for three claims. First, Wolff's system relies on experience at every step and his views on experiments, observations, hypotheses, and the a priori are in line with those of experimental philosophers. Second, the study of Wolff's views demonstrates the influence of experimental philosophy in early eighteenth-century Germany. Third, references to Wolff's empiricism and rationalism are best identified or replaced with (...)
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  11.  1
    Alberto Vanzo, Introduction.
    The articles in the symposium “Teaching Early Modern Philosophy: New Approaches” provide theoretical reflections and practical advice on new ways of teaching undergraduate survey courses in early modern philosophy. This introduction lays out the rationale for the symposium and summarizes the articles that compose it.
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  12.  5
    Alberto Vanzo (forthcoming). Kant's "False Subtlety of the Four Syllogistic Figures" in Its Intellectual Context. In Luca Gili & Marco Sgarbi (eds.), The Aftermath of Syllogism. Bloomsbury
    This chapter discusses the relation between Kant’s views on the foundations of syllogistic inference in ‘The False Subtlety of the Four Syllogistic Figures’, the views of eighteenth-century German authors who wrote on syllogism, and the conception of metaphysics that Kant developed in 1762-1764. Kant’s positions are, on the whole, rather original, even though they are not as independent from the intellectual context as Kant’s later, Critical philosophy. Despite Kant’s polemical tone, his views on syllogism are not primarily motivated by polemical (...)
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  13.  5
    Machiel Keestra, How Do Narratives and Brains Mutually Influence Each Other? Taking Both the ‘Neuroscientific Turn’ and the ‘Narrative Turn’ in Explaining Bio-Political Orders.
    Introduction: the neuroscientific turn in political science The observation that brains and political orders are interdependent is almost trivial. Obviously, political orders require brain processes in order to emerge and to remain in place, as these processes enable action and cognition. Conversely, every since Aristotle coined man as “by nature a political animal” (Aristotle, Pol.: 1252a 3; cf. Eth. Nic.: 1097b 11), this also suggests that the political engagements of this animal has likely consequences for its natural development, including the (...)
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  14.  6
    Wayne M. Martin, Fichte’s Logical Legacy: Thetic Judgment From the Wissenschaftslehre to Brentano.
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Apr 26th 2016 GMT
Manuscripts
  1.  8
    Luca Ferrero, Inescapability Revisited.
    According to constitutivism, the objective authority of practical reason is to be grounded in the constitutive features of agency. In this paper, I offer a brief survey of the basic structure of constitutive argument about objectivity and consider how constitutivism might dispel the worry that it can only ground a *conditional* kind of authority. In response to Enoch's original shmagency challenge, in the past I argued that the inescapability of agency shows that we should not be worried by challenges that (...)
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  2.  9
    Luca Ferrero, Intending, Acting, and Doing.
    I argue that intending and acting belong to the same genus: intending is a kind of doing continuous in structure with intentional acting. Future-directed intending is not a truly separate phenomenon from either the intending in action or the acting itself. Ultimately, all intentions are in action, or better still, in extended courses of action. I show how the intuitive distinction between intending and acting is based on modeling the two phenomena on the extreme and limiting cases of an otherwise (...)
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  3.  9
    Casey Helgeson, Pattern as Observation: Darwin's 'Great Facts' of Geographical Distribution.
    Among philosophical analyses of Darwin’s Origin, a standard view says the theory presented there had no concrete observational consequences against which it might be checked. I challenge this idea with a new analysis of Darwin’s principal geographical distribution observations and how they connect to his common ancestry hypothesis.
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Apr 25th 2016 GMT
Manuscripts
  1.  5
    Gabrielle Samuel, Alan Cribb, John Owens & Clare Williams, Relative Values: Perspectives on a Neuroimaging Technology From Above and Within the Ethical Landscape.
    In this paper we contribute to ‘sociology in bioethics’ and help clarify the range of ways sociological work can contribute to ethics scholarship. We do this using a case study of an innovative neurotechnology, functional magnetic resonance imaging, and its use to attempt to diagnose and communicate with severely brain-injured patients. We compare empirical data from interviews with relatives of patients who have a severe brain injury with perspectives from mainstream bioethics scholars. We use the notion of an ‘ethical landscape’ (...)
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Apr 23rd 2016 GMT
Manuscripts
  1.  4
    M. Addis, Peter D. Sozou, F. Gobet & P. C. Lane, Computational Scientific Discovery and Cognitive Science Theories.
    This study is concerned with processes for discovering new theories in science. It considers a computational approach to scientific discovery, as applied to the discovery of theories in cognitive science. The approach combines two ideas. First, a process-based scientific theory can be represented as a computer program. Second, an evolutionary computational method, genetic programming, allows computer programs to be improved through a process of computational trialand-error. Putting these two ideas together leads to a system that can automatically generate and improve (...)
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  2.  5
    Luc Bovens, Don’T Mess with My Smokes: Cigarettes and Freedom.
    Considerations of objective-value freedom and status freedom do impose constraints on policies that restrict access to cigarettes. As to the objective-value freedom, something of value is lost when anti-alcohol policies lead to pub closures interfering with valued life styles, and a similar, though weaker, argument can be made for cigarettes. As to status freedom, non-arbitrariness requires consultation with vulnerable populations to learn what might aid them with smoking cessation.
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  3.  8
    Aaron Cotnoir, Does Universalism Entail Extensionalism?
    Does a commitment to mereological universalism automatically bring along a commitment to the controversial doctrine of mereological extensionalism — the view that objects with the same proper parts are identical? A recent argument suggests the answer is ‘yes’. This paper attempts a systematic response to the argument, considering nearly every available line of reply. It argues that only one approach — the mutual parts view — can yield a viable mereology where universalism does not entail extensionalism.
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  4.  13
    David Ellerman, On Classical and Quantum Logical Entropy.
    The notion of a partition on a set is mathematically dual to the notion of a subset of a set, so there is a logic of partitions dual to Boole's logic of subsets (Boolean logic is usually mis-specified as "propositional" logic). The notion of an element of a subset has as its dual the notion of a distinction of a partition (a pair of elements in different blocks). Boole developed finite logical probability as the normalized counting measure on elements of (...)
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  5.  3
    David Ellerman, The Quantum Logic of Direct-Sum Decompositions.
    Since the pioneering work of Birkhoff and von Neumann, quantum logic has been interpreted as the logic of (closed) subspaces of a Hilbert space. There is a progression from the usual Boolean logic of subsets to the "quantum logic" of subspaces of a general vector space--which is then specialized to the closed subspaces of a Hilbert space. But there is a "dual" progression. The notion of a partition (or quotient set or equivalence relation) is dual (in a category-theoretic sense) to (...)
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  6.  15
    Luca Moretti, Phenomenal Conservatism and the Problem of Reflective Awareness.
    This paper criticizes phenomenal conservatism––the influential view according to which a subject S’s seeming that P provides S with defeasible justification for believing P. I argue that phenomenal conservatism, if true at all, has a significant limitation: seeming-based justification is elusive because S can easily lose it by just reflecting on her seemings and speculating about their causes––I call this the problem of reflective awareness. Because of this limitation, phenomenal conservatism doesn’t have all the epistemic merits attributed to it by (...)
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