New manuscripts

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Jul 23rd 2016 GMT
Manuscripts
  1. Daihyun Chung, Indexical Realism by Inter-Agentic Reference.
    I happen to believe that though human experiences are to be characterized as pluralistic they are all rooted in the one reality. I would assume the thesis of pluralism but how could I maintain my belief in the realism? There are various discussions in favor of realism but they appear to stay within a particular paradigm so to be called “internal realism”. In this paper I would try to justify my belief in the reality by discussing a special use of (...)
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Jul 22nd 2016 GMT
Manuscripts
  1.  3
    E. Glick, Practical Modes of Presentation.
    The Intellectualist thesis that know-how is a kind of propositional knowledge faces a simple problem: For any proposition p, it seems that one could know p without knowing how to do the activity in question. For example, it seems that one could know that w is a way to swim even if one didn't know how to swim oneself. In this paper I argue that this "sufficiency problem" cannot be adequately addressed by appealing to practical modes of presentation.
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Jul 21st 2016 GMT
Manuscripts
  1.  2
    James Andow, Expecting Moral Philosophers to Be Reliable.
    Are philosophers’ intuitions more reliable than philosophical novices’? Are we entitled to assume the superiority of philosophers’ intuitions just as we assume that experts in other domains have more reliable intuitions than novices? Ryberg raises some doubts and his arguments promise to undermine the expertise defence of intuition-use in philosophy once and for all. In this paper, I raise a number of objections to these arguments. I argue that philosophers receive sufficient feedback about the quality of their intuitions and that (...)
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  2.  3
    James Andow, How Distinctive is Philosophers’ Intuition Talk?
    The word “intuition” is one frequently used in philosophy. It is often assumed that the way in which philosophers use the word, and others like it, is very distinctive. This claim has been subjected to little empirical scrutiny, however. This article presents the first steps in a qualitative analysis of the use of intuition talk in the academy. It presents the findings of two preliminary empirical studies. The first study examines the use of intuition talk in spoken academic English. The (...)
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  3.  2
    James Andow, How “Intuition” Exploded.
    Recent decades have seen a surge in interest in metaphilosophy. In particular there has been an interest in philosophical methodology. Various questions have been asked about philosophical methods. Are our methods any good? Can we improve upon them? Prior to such evaluative and ameliorative concerns, however, is the matter of what methods philosophers actually use. Worryingly, our understanding of philosophical methodology is impoverished in various respects. This article considers one particular respect in which we seem to be missing an important (...)
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  4.  2
    James Andow & Florian Cova, Why Compatibilist Intuitions Are Not Mistaken: A Reply to Feltz and Millan.
    In the past decade, a number of empirical researchers have suggested that laypeople have compatibilist intuitions. In a recent paper, Feltz and Millan have challenged this conclusion by claiming that most laypeople are only compatibilists in appearance and are in fact willing to attribute free will to people no matter what. As evidence for this claim, they have shown that an important proportion of laypeople still attribute free will to agents in fatalistic universes. In this paper, we first argue that (...)
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  5.  5
    Emma Borg, Applied Philosophy of Language.
    This chapter explores the extent to which philosophy of language can be considered an applied discipline. I consider, first, ways in which sub-sections of philosophy of language may be considered as applied in terms of their subject matter and/or the kinds of questions being addressed. Then, in the second part of the chapter, I turn to consider a more general conception of philosophy of language as applied, which arises from the methodology adopted and the relationship of the discipline to empirical (...)
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  6.  3
    Emma Borg, Exploding Explicatures.
    ‘Pragmaticist’ positions posit a three-way division within utterance content between: the standing meaning of the sentence, a somewhat pragmatically enhanced meaning which captures what the speaker explicitly conveys, and further indirectly conveyed propositions which the speaker merely implies. Here I re-examine the notion of an explicature, asking how it is defined and what work explicatures are supposed to do. I argue that explicatures get defined in three different ways and that these distinct definitions can and do pull apart. Thus the (...)
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  7.  6
    Jonathan Dancy, More Right Than Wrong.
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  8.  2
    Maximilian De Gaynesford, Poetic Utterances: Attuning Poetry and Philosophy.
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  9.  3
    Maximilian De Gaynesford, Scepticism in the Sonnets.
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  10.  1
    Maximilian De Gaynesford, The Rift in the Lute: Attuning Poetry and Philosophy.
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  11.  2
    Maximilian De Gaynesford, Wittgenstein on I and the Self.
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  12.  3
    Luke Elson, Tenenbaum and Raffaman on Vague Projects, the Self-Torturer, and the Sorites.
    Sergio Tenenbaum and Diana Raffman contend that ‘vague projects’ motivate radical revisions to orthodox, utility-maximising rational choice theory. Their argument cannot succeed if such projects merely ground instances of the paradox of the sorites, or heap. Tenenbaum and Raffman are not blind to this, and argue that Warren Quinn’s Puzzle of the Self-Torturer does not rest on the sorites. I argue that their argument both fails to generalise to most vague projects, and is ineffective in the case of the Self-Torturer (...)
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  13.  2
    Nat Hansen, A New Argument From Interpersonal Variation to Subjectivism About Color: A Response to Gómez-Torrente.
    I describe a new, comparative, version of the argument from interpersonal variation to subjectivism about color. The comparative version undermines a recent objectivist response to standard versions of that argument.
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  14.  3
    Nat Hansen, Experimental Philosophy of Language.
    Experimental philosophy of language uses experimental methods developed in the cognitive sciences to investigate topics of interest to philosophers of language. This article describes the methodological background for the development of experimental approaches to topics in philosophy of language, distinguishes negative and positive projects in experimental philosophy of language, and evaluates experimental work on the reference of proper names and natural kind terms. The reliability of expert judgments vs. the judgments of ordinary speakers, the role that ambiguity plays in influencing (...)
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  15.  2
    Nat Hansen & Emmanuel Chemla, Linguistic Experiments and Ordinary Language Philosophy.
    J.L. Austin is regarded as having an especially acute ear for fine distinctions of meaning overlooked by other philosophers. Austin employs an informal experimental approach to gathering evidence in support of these fine distinctions in meaning, an approach that has become a standard technique for investigating meaning in both philosophy and linguistics. In this paper, we subject Austin's methods to formal experimental investigation. His methods produce mixed results: We find support for his most famous distinction, drawn on the basis of (...)
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  16.  1
    Brad Hooker, On E.E. Constance Jones's Article 'Practical Dualism'.
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  17.  1
    Brad Hooker, The Elements of Well-Being.
    This essay contends that the constitutive elements of well-being are plural, partly objective, and separable. The essay argues that these elements are pleasure, friendship, significant achievement, important knowledge, and autonomy, but not either the appreciation of beauty or the living of a morally good life. The essay goes on to attack the view that elements of well-being must be combined in order for well-being to be enhanced. The final section argues against the view that, because anything important to say about (...)
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  18.  7
    Brad Hooker, Wrongness, Evolutionary Debunking, Public Rules.
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  19.  1
    Ruth Kastner, Is There Really "Retrocausation" in Time-Symmetric Approaches to Quantum Mechanics?
    Time-symmetric interpretations of quantum theory are often presented as featuring "retrocausal" effects in addition to the usual forward notion of causation. This paper examines the ontological implications of certain time- symmetric theories, and finds that no dynamical notion of causation applies to them, either forward or backward. It is concluded that such theories actually describe a static picture, in which the notion of causation is relegated to a descriptor of static relationships among events. In addition, these theories lead to an (...)
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  20.  1
    Nicholas Maxwell, Relativity Theory May Not Have the Last Word on the Nature of Time: Quantum Theory and Probabilism.
    Two radically different views about time are possible. According to the first, the universe is three dimensional. It has a past and a future, but that does not mean it is spread out in time as it is spread out in the three dimensions of space. This view requires that there is an unambiguous, absolute, cosmic-wide "now" at each instant. According to the second view about time, the universe is four dimensional. It is spread out in both space and time (...)
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  21.  4
    David S. Oderberg, All for the Good.
    The Guise of the Good thesis has received much attention since Anscombe's brief defence in her book Intention. I approach it here from a less common perspective - indirectly, via a theory explaining how it is that moral behaviour is even possible. After setting out how morality requires the employment of a fundamental test, I argue that moral behaviour involves orientation toward the good. Immoral behaviour cannot, however, involve orientation to evil as such, given the theory of evil as privation. (...)
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  22.  5
    David S. Oderberg, Religion and Normative Ethics.
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  23.  2
    John Preston, Logical Space and Phase-Space.
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  24.  1
    Alexander Reutlinger, Does the Counterfactual Theory of Explanation Apply to Non-Causal Explanations in Metaphysics?
    In the recent philosophy of explanation, a growing attention to and discussion of non-causal explanations has emerged, as there seem to be compelling examples of non-causal explanations in the sciences, in pure mathematics, and in metaphysics. I defend the claim that the counterfactual theory of explanation captures the explanatory character of both non-causal scientific and metaphysical explanations. According to the CTE, scientific and metaphysical explanations are explanatory by virtue of revealing counterfactual dependencies between the explanandum and the explanans. I support (...)
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  25.  3
    Severin Schroeder, Mathematics and Forms of Life.
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  26.  2
    Thomas Schindler, Type-Free Truth.
    This book is a contribution to the flourishing field of formal and philosophical work on truth and the semantic paradoxes. Our aim is to present several theories of truth, to investigate some of their model-theoretic, recursion-theoretic and proof-theoretic aspects, and to evaluate their philosophical significance. In Part I we first outline some motivations for studying formal theories of truth, fix some terminology, provide some background on Tarski’s and Kripke’s theories of truth, and then discuss the prospects of classical type-free truth. (...)
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  27.  5
    Philip Stratton-Lake, Self-Evidence, Intuition and Understanding.
    I argue that the account of self-evidence developed by Robert Audi cannot be true, and offer an alternatve account in terms of intuitions, understood as seemings.
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Jul 20th 2016 GMT
New books
  1.  2
    Amena Coronado (2016). Suffering & The Value of Life. Dissertation, University of California, Santa Cruz
    Friedrich Nietzsche insisted that despite what philosophers and prophets have taught, suffering is desirable because it increases vitality and provides opportunities for growth. This is why one of his main criticisms of the pessimism and nihilism of his time is that they treat suffering as an argument against the value of life and in doing so, life is devalued by them. In an effort to find an alternative mode of valuation, he proposes that human beings should adopt an attitude of (...)
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Manuscripts
  1.  2
    Christoph Hoerl & Teresa McCormack, Making Decisions About the Future : Regret and the Cognitive Function of Episodic Memory.
    In the recent literature on episodic memory, there has been increasing recognition of the need to provide an account of its adaptive function. In this context, it is sometimes argued that episodic memory is critical for certain forms of decision-making about the future. The authors of this chapter criticize existing accounts that try to give episodic memory a role in decision-making, before providing a novel account of their own. This turns on the thought of a link between episodic memory and (...)
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Jul 19th 2016 GMT
Manuscripts
  1.  6
    Béatrice Han-Pile, Phenomenology and Anthropology in Foucault’s Introduction to Binswanger’s ‘Dream and Existence’: A Mirror Image to The Order of Things?
    In this paper, I examine the relation between phenomenology and anthropology by placing Foucault’s first published piece, Introduction to Binswanger’s ‘Dream and Existence’ in dialectical tension with The Order of Things. I argue that the early work, which so far hasn’t received much critical attention, is of particular interest because while OT is notoriously critical of anthropological confusions in general, and of ‘Man’ as an empirico-transcendental double in particular, IB views ‘existential anthropology’ as a unique opportunity to establish a new (...)
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  2.  6
    Neil McDonnell, Causal Exclusion and the Limits of Proportionality.
    Causal exclusion arguments are taken to threaten the autonomy of the special sciences, and the causal efficacy of mental properties. A recent line of response to these arguments has appealed to "independently plausible" and "well grounded" theories of causation to rebut key premises. In this paper I consider two papers which proceed in this vein and show that they share a common feature: they both require causes to be proportional (in Yablo's sense) to their effects. I argue that this feature (...)
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  3.  7
    Gabriel Vacariu, Quantum Mechanics: Unbelievable Similarities Between My EDWs and Bill Bill Poirier’s ‘Many Interacting Worlds’ (2016).
    Chapter 12 -/- Quantum mechanics: Unbelievable similarities between my EDWs and Bill Bill Poirier’s ‘Many Interacting Worlds’ (2016) .
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Jul 17th 2016 GMT
Manuscripts
  1.  14
    Lina Jansson, Explanatory Asymmetries, Ground, and Ontological Dependence.
    The notions of ground and ontological dependence have made a prominent resurgence in much of contemporary metaphysics. However, objections have been raised. On the one hand, objections have been raised to the need for distinctively metaphysical notions of ground and ontological dependence. On the other, objections have been raised to the usefulness of adding ground and ontological dependence to the existing store of other metaphysical notions. Even the logical properties of ground and ontological dependence are under debate. In this article, (...)
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  2.  10
    Lina Jansson, Explanatory Asymmetries: Laws of Nature Rehabilitated.
    The problem of explanatory non-symmetries provides the strongest reason to abandon the view that laws can figure in explanations without causal underpinnings. I argue that this problem can be overcome. The solution that I propose starts from noticing the importance of conditions of application when laws do explanatory work, and I go on to develop a notion of nomological dependence that can tackle the non-symmetry problem. The strategy is to show how a strong notion of counterfactual dependence as guaranteed by (...)
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  3.  9
    Lina Jansson, Everettian Quantum Mechanics and Physical Probability: Against the Principle of “State Supervenience”.
    Everettian quantum mechanics faces the challenge of how to make sense of probability and probabilistic reasoning in a setting where there is typically no unique outcome of measurements. Wallace has built on a proof by Deutsch to argue that a notion of probability can be recovered in the many worlds setting. In particular, Wallace argues that a rational agent has to assign probabilities in accordance with the Born rule. This argument relies on a rationality constraint that Wallace calls state supervenience. (...)
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  4.  10
    Alex Voorhoeve, Ken G. Binmore, Arnaldur Stefansson & Lisa Stewart, Ambiguity Attitudes, Framing, and Consistency.
    We use probability-matching variations on Ellsberg’s single-urn experiment to assess three questions: How sensitive are ambiguity attitudes to changes from a gain to a loss frame? How sensitive are ambiguity attitudes to making ambiguity easier to recognize? What is the relation between subjects’ consistency of choice and the ambiguity attitudes their choices display? Contrary to most other studies, we find that a switch from a gain to a loss frame does not lead to a switch from ambiguity aversion to ambiguity (...)
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Jul 16th 2016 GMT
Manuscripts
  1.  4
    Kristoffer Ahlstrom-Vij & Jeffrey Dunn, Is Reliabilism a Form of Consequentialism?
    Reliabilism -- the view that a belief is justified iff it is produced by a reliable process -- is often characterized as a form of consequentialism. Recently, critics of reliabilism have suggested that, since a form of consequentialism, reliabilism condones a variety of problematic trade-offs, involving cases where someone forms an epistemically deficient belief now that will lead her to more epistemic value later. In the present paper, we argue that the relevant argument against reliabilism fails because it equivocates. While (...)
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  2.  5
    Catrin Campbell-Moore, Self-Referential Probability.
    This thesis focuses on expressively rich languages that can formalise talk about probability. These languages have sentences that say something about probabilities of probabilities, but also sentences that say something about the probability of themselves. For example: : “The probability of the sentence labelled π is not greater than 1/2.” Such sentences lead to philosophical and technical challenges. For example seemingly harmless principles, such as an introspection principle, lead to inconsistencies with the axioms of probability in this framework. This thesis (...)
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  3.  14
    J. Lee, Radiohead and Philosophy.
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  4.  11
    J. Lee, The Psychology of Screenwriting: Theory and Practice.
    The Psychology of Screenwriting is more than an interesting book on the theory and practice of screenwriting. It is also a philosophical analysis of predetermination and freewill in the context of writing and human life in our mediated world of technology. Drawing on humanism, existentialism, Buddhism, postmodernism and transhumanism, and diverse thinkers from Meister Eckhart to Friedrich Nietzsche, Theodor Adorno, Jacques Derrida, Jean Baudrillard and Gilles Deleuze, The Psychology of Screenwriting will be of use to screenwriters, film students, philosophers and (...)
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  5.  6
    Michael Wilde & Jon Williamson, Bayesianism and Information.
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Jul 15th 2016 GMT
Manuscripts
  1.  3
    Oscar Morice, Mathew Elameer, Mina Arsanious, Helen Stephens, Eleanor Soutter, Thomas Hughes & Brendan Clarke, Metabolic Theories of Whipple Disease.
    Whipple disease is a rare, infectious, disease first described from a single case by Whipple in 1907. As well as characterising the clinical and pathological features of the condition, Whipple made two suggestions regarding its aetiology. These were either than the disease was caused by an infectious agent, or that it was of metabolic origin. As the disease is now thought to be caused by infection with the bacterium Tropheryma whipplei, historical reviews of the history of the disease typically mention (...)
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Jul 13th 2016 GMT
Manuscripts
  1.  6
    Evan Butts, Review of "The Unexplained Intellect: Complexity, Time, and the Metaphysics of Embodied Thought". [REVIEW]
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  2.  4
    J. M. Fritzman & Kristin Thornburg, “I Is Someone Else”: Constituting the Extended Mind’s Fourth Wave, with Hegel.
    We seek to constitute the extended mind’s fourth wave, socially distributed group cognition, and we do so by thinking with Hegel. The extended mind theory’s first wave invokes the parity principle, which maintains that processes that occur external to the organism’s skin should be considered mental if they are regarded as mental when they occur inside the organism. The second wave appeals to the complementarity principle, which claims that what is crucial is that these processes together constitute a cognitive system. (...)
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  3.  4
    Wendy Lynne Lee, Review of "The United States and Terrorism: An Ironic Perspective". [REVIEW]
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  4.  8
    J. McKenzie, Deconstructing Happiness: Critical Sociology and the Good Life.
    This book offers an original account of the good life in late modernity through a uniquely sociological lens. It considers the various ways that social and cultural factors can encourage or impede genuine efforts to live a good life by deconstructing the concepts of happiness and contentment within cultural narratives of the good life. Although empirical studies have dominated the discourse on happiness in recent decades, the emphasis on finding causal and correlational relationships has led to a field of research (...)
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  5.  8
    Andrew Winters, Cognitive Processes and Asymmetrical Dependencies, or How Thinking is Like Swimming.
    Where does the cognitive system begin and end? Intracranialists maintain that the cognitive system is entirely identifiable with the biological central nervous system. Transcranialists, on the other hand, suggest that the cognitive system can extend beyond the biological CNS. In the second division of Supersizing the Mind, Clark defends the transcranial account against various objections. Of interest for this paper is Clark’s response to what he calls “asymmetry arguments.”Asymmetry arguments can be summarized as follows: subtract the props and aids, and (...)
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  6.  6
    Gina Zavota, Expanding the Extended Mind: Merleau-Ponty’s Late Ontology as Radical Enactive Cognition.
    In this essay, I argue that the late ontology of Maurice Merleau-Ponty, in particular the system he began to develop in The Visible and the Invisible, can be conceived of as a form of Radical Enactive Cognition, as described by Hutto and Myin in Radicalizing Enactivism. I will begin by discussing Clark and Chalmers’ extended mind hypothesis, as well as the enactive view of consciousness proposed by Varela, Thompson, and Rosch in The Embodied Mind. However, neither Clark and Chalmers’ extended (...)
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