Search results for 'ACTION-POTENTIALS' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. R. C. Davis (1938). The Relation of Muscle Action Potentials to Difficulty and Frustration. Journal of Experimental Psychology 23 (2):141.score: 150.0
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  2. G. L. Freeman & L. H. Sharp (1941). Muscular Action Potentials and the Time-Error Function in Lifted Weight Judgments. Journal of Experimental Psychology 29 (1):23.score: 150.0
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  3. Robert L. Henderson (1952). Remote Action Potentials at the Moment of Response in a Simple Reaction-Time Situation. Journal of Experimental Psychology 44 (4):238.score: 150.0
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  4. Walter W. Surwillo (1956). Psychological Factors in Muscle-Action Potentials: EMG Gradients. Journal of Experimental Psychology 52 (4):263.score: 150.0
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  5. James C. Diggory, Sherwin J. Klein & Malcolm Cohen (1964). Muscle-Action Potentials and Estimated Probability of Success. Journal of Experimental Psychology 68 (5):449.score: 150.0
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  6. W. A. Shaw & L. H. Kline (1947). A Study of Muscle Action Potentials During the Attempted Solution by Children of Problems of Increasing Difficulty. Journal of Experimental Psychology 37 (2):146.score: 150.0
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  7. R. S. Daniel (1939). The Distribution of Muscular Action Potentials During Maze Learning. Journal of Experimental Psychology 24 (6):621.score: 102.0
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  8. S. R. Hathaway (1935). An Action Potential Study of Neuromuscular Relations. Journal of Experimental Psychology 18 (3):285.score: 102.0
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  9. Mary E. Reuder (1956). The Effect of Ego Orientation and Problem Difficulty on Muscle Action Potentials. Journal of Experimental Psychology 51 (2):142.score: 102.0
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  10. Arnon Levy (2013). What Was Hodgkin and Huxley's Achievement? British Journal for the Philosophy of Science:axs043.score: 74.0
    The Hodgkin–Huxley (HH) model of the action potential is a theoretical pillar of modern neurobiology. In a number of recent publications, Carl Craver ([2006], [2007], [2008]) has argued that the model is explanatorily deficient because it does not reveal enough about underlying molecular mechanisms. I offer an alternative picture of the HH model, according to which it deliberately abstracts from molecular specifics. By doing so, the model explains whole-cell behaviour as the product of a mass of underlying low-level events. The (...)
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  11. Hans-Jochen Heinze, Marcus Heldmann, Jürgen Voges, Hermann Hinrichs, Josep Marco-Pallares, Jens-Max Hopf, Ulf Müller, Imke Galazky, Volker Sturm, Bernhard Bogerts & Thomas F. Münte (2009). Counteracting Incentive Sensitization in Severe Alcohol Dependence Using Deep Brain Stimulation of the Nucleus Accumbens: Clinical and Basic Science Aspects. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 3:22.score: 72.0
    The ventral striatum / nucleus accumbens has been implicated in the craving for drugs and alcohol which is a major reason for relapse of addicted people. Craving might be induced by drug-related cues. This suggests that disruption of craving-related neural activity in the nucleus accumbens may significantly reduce craving in alcohol-dependent patients. Here we report on preliminary clinical and neurophysiological evidence in three male patients who were treated with high frequency deep brain stimulation of the nucleus accumbens bilaterally. All three (...)
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  12. Thomas F. Münte, Marcus Heldmann, Hermann Hinrichs, Josep Marco-Pallares, Ulrike M. Krämer, Volker Sturm & Hans-Jochen Heinze (2007). Nucleus Accumbens is Involved in Human Action Monitoring: Evidence From Invasive Electrophysiological Recordings. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 2:11.score: 72.0
    The Nucleus accumbens (Nacc) has been proposed to act as a limbic-motor interface. Here, using invasive intraoperative recordings in an awake patient suffering from obsessive-compulsive disease (OCD), we demonstrate that its activity is modulated by the quality of performance of the subject in a choice reaction time task designed to tap action monitoring processes. Action monitoring, that is, error detection and correction, is thought to be supported by a system involving the dopaminergic midbrain, the basal ganglia, and the medial prefrontal (...)
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  13. Hinrichs Hermann (2011). Action Control Related Local Field Potentials in the Human Pedunculopontine Nuclei: A Single Case Report. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5.score: 72.0
  14. Benjamin W. Libet (1985). Unconscious Cerebral Initiative and the Role of Conscious Will in Voluntary Action. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (4):529-66.score: 66.0
    Voluntary acts are preceded by electrophysiological (RPs). With spontaneous acts involving no preplanning, the main negative RP shift begins at about200 ms. Control experiments, in which a skin stimulus was timed (S), helped evaluate each subject's error in reporting the clock times for awareness of any perceived event.
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  15. Marcel Weber (2005). Indeterminism in Neurobiology. Philosophy of Science 72 (5):663-674.score: 60.0
    I examine different arguments that could be used to establish indeterminism of neurological processes. Even though scenarios where single events at the molecular level make the difference in the outcome of such processes are realistic, this falls short of establishing indeterminism, because it is not clear that these molecular events are subject to quantum mechanical uncertainty. Furthermore, attempts to argue for indeterminism autonomously (i.e., independently of quantum mechanics) fail, because both deterministic and indeterministic models can account for the empirically observed (...)
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  16. P. Fries (2005). A Mechanism for Cognitive Dynamics: Neuronal Communication Through Neuronal Coherence. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 9 (10):474-480.score: 60.0
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  17. Henry D. Meyer (1949). Reaction Time as Related to Tensions in Muscles Not Essential in the Reaction. Journal of Experimental Psychology 39 (1):96.score: 60.0
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  18. Roland C. Davis (1948). Motor Effects of Strong Auditory Stimuli. Journal of Experimental Psychology 38 (3):257.score: 60.0
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  19. Roland C. Davis (1950). Motor Responses to Auditory Stimuli Above and Below Threshold. Journal of Experimental Psychology 40 (1):107.score: 60.0
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  20. John B. Fink (1954). Conditioning of Muscle Action Potential Increments Accompanying an Instructed Movement. Journal of Experimental Psychology 47 (2):61.score: 60.0
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  21. G. L. Freeman (1940). Cortical Autonomous Rhythms and the Excitatory Levels of Other Bodily Tissues. Journal of Experimental Psychology 27 (2):160-171.score: 60.0
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  22. Charles R. Galbrecht, Roscoe A. Dykman, William G. Reese & Tetsuko Suzuki (1965). Intrasession Adaptation and Intersession Extinction of the Components of the Orienting Response. Journal of Experimental Psychology 70 (6):585.score: 60.0
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  23. Joseph B. Sidowski & Robert G. Eason (1960). Drive, Verbal Performance, and Muscle Action Potential. Journal of Experimental Psychology 60 (6):365.score: 60.0
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  24. R. C. Davis (1943). The Design and Testing of Multiple Amplifiers for Action Potential Recording. Journal of Experimental Psychology 32 (3):270.score: 60.0
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  25. Donald G. Doehring (1957). Conditioning of Muscle Action Potential Responses Resulting From Passive Hand Movement. Journal of Experimental Psychology 54 (4):292.score: 60.0
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  26. John B. Fink & R. C. Davis (1951). Generalization of a Muscle Action Potential Response to Tonal Duration. Journal of Experimental Psychology 42 (6):403.score: 60.0
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  27. Davide Rigoni, Marcel Brass & Giuseppe Sartori (2010). Post-Action Determinants of the Reported Time of Conscious Intentions. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 4.score: 54.0
    The question of whether our behaviour is guided by our conscious intentions is gaining momentum within the field of cognitive neuroscience. It has been demonstrated that the subjective experience that conscious intentions are the driving force of our actions, is built partially on a post hoc reconstruction. Our hypothesis was that this reconstructive process is mediated by an action-monitoring system that compares the predicted and the actual sensory consequences of an action. We applied Event Related Potentials (ERP) to a variant (...)
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  28. Stefan Dürschmid, Tino Zaehle, Klaus Kopitzki, Jürgen Voges, Friedhelm Carl Schmitt, Hans-Jochen Heinze, Robert T. Knight & Hermann Hinrichs (2013). Phase-Amplitude Cross-Frequency Coupling in the Human Nucleus Accumbens Tracks Action Monitoring During Cognitive Control. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 54.0
    The Nucleus Accumbens (NAcc) is an important structure for the transfer of information between cortical and subcortical structures, especially the prefrontal cortex and the hippocampus. However, the mechanism that allows the NAcc to achieve this integration is not well understood. Phase-amplitude cross-frequency coupling (PAC) of oscillations in different frequency bands has been proposed as an effective mechanism to form functional networks to optimize transfer and integration of information. Here we assess PAC between theta and high gamma oscillations as a potential (...)
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  29. Carl F. Craver (2008). Physical Law and Mechanistic Explanation in the Hodgkin and Huxley Model of the Action Potential. Philosophy of Science 75 (5):1022-1033.score: 48.0
    Hodgkin and Huxley’s model of the action potential is an apparent dream case of covering‐law explanation in biology. The model includes laws of physics and chemistry that, coupled with details about antecedent and background conditions, can be used to derive features of the action potential. Hodgkin and Huxley insist that their model is not an explanation. This suggests either that subsuming a phenomenon under physical laws is insufficient to explain it or that Hodgkin and Huxley were wrong. I defend Hodgkin (...)
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  30. Carl Craver, Why the Hodgkin and Huxely Model Does Not Explain the Action Potential.score: 48.0
    Hodgkin and Huxley’s 1952 model of the action potential is an apparent dream case of covering-law explanation. The model appeals to general laws of physics and chemistry (specifically, Ohm’s law and the Nernst equation), and the laws, coupled with details about antecedent and background conditions, entail many of the significant properties of the action potential. However, Hodgkin and Huxley insist that their model falls short of an explanation. This historical fact suggests either that there is more to explaining the action (...)
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  31. Daniel von Wachter, Libet's Experiment Provides No Evidence Against Strong Libertarian Free Will Because Readiness Potentials Do Not Cause Our Actions.score: 48.0
    This article argues against Benjamin Libet’s claim that his experiment has shown that our actions are caused by brain events which begin before we decide and before we even think about the action. It assumes, contra the com- patibilists and pro Libet, that this claim is incompatible with free will. It clarifies what exactly should be meant by saying that the readiness potential causes, initiates, or pre- pares an action. It shows why Libet’s experiment does not support his claim and (...)
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  32. G. A. Ojemann, J. Ojemann & N. F. Ramsey (2012). Relation Between Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) and Single Neuron, Local Field Potential (LFP) and Electrocorticography (ECoG) Activity in Human Cortex. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:34-34.score: 48.0
    The relation between changes in the blood oxygen dependent metabolic changes imaged by fMRI and neural events directly recorded from human cortex from single neurons, LFPs and ECoG is critically reviewed, based on the published literature including findings from the authors’ laboratories. All these data are from special populations, usually patients with medically refractory epilepsy, as this provides the major opportunity for direct cortical neuronal recording in humans. For LFP and ECoG changes are often sought in different frequency bands, for (...)
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  33. Luisa Sartori, Chiara Begliomini & Umberto Castiello (2013). Motor Resonance in Left- and Right-Handers: Evidence for Effector-Independent Motor Representations. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 48.0
  34. Domingo J. Louis-Martinez (2012). Relativistic Action at a Distance and Fields. Foundations of Physics 42 (2):215-223.score: 42.0
    After a brief review of the field formulations and the relativistic non-instantaneous action-at-a-distance formulations of some well known classical theories, we study Rivacoba’s generalization of a theory with a linearly rising potential as a relativistic non-instantaneous action-at-a-distance theory. For this case we construct the corresponding field theory, which turns out to coincide with a model proposed by Kiskis to describe strong interactions. We construct the action functional for this field theory. Although this model belongs to the class of Lagrangian theories (...)
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  35. Walter Freeman (2014). Consciousness Began with a Hunter's Plan. Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 10 (1):140-148.score: 42.0
    Animals search for food and shelter by locomotion through time and space. The elemental step is the action-perception cycle, which has three steps. In the first step a volley of action potentials initiated by an act of search (sniff, saccade, etc.) triggers the formation of a macroscopic wave packet that constitutes the memory of the stimulus. The wave packet is filtered and sent to the entorhinal cortex, where it is combined with wave packets from all sensory systems. This triggers the (...)
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  36. Dorothea Hämmerer, Guido Biele, Viktor Müller, Holger Thiele, Peter Nürnberg, Hauke R. Heekeren & Shu-Chen Li (2013). Effects of PPP1R1B (DARPP-32) Polymorphism on Feedback-Related Brain Potentials Across the Life Span. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 42.0
    Maximizing gains during probabilistic reinforcement learning requires the updating of choice–outcome expectations at the time when the feedback about a specific choice or action is given. Extant theories and evidence suggest that dopaminergic modulation plays a crucial role in reinforcement learning and the updating of choice–outcome expectations. Furthermore, recently a positive component of the event-related potential (ERP) about 200 msec (P2) after feedback has been suggested to reflect such updating. The efficacy of dopaminergic modulation changes across the life span. However, (...)
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  37. Janeen D. Loehr (2013). Sensory Attenuation for Jointly Produced Action Effects. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 42.0
    Successful joint action often requires people to distinguish between their own and others’ contributions to a shared goal. One mechanism that is thought to underlie a self-other distinction is sensory attenuation, whereby the sensory consequences of one’s own actions are reduced compared to other sensory events. Previous research has shown that the auditory N1 event-related potential (ERP) response is reduced for self-generated compared to externally-generated tones. The current study examined whether attenuation also occurs for jointly-generated tones, which require two people (...)
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  38. Jens Kristian Fosse (2005). The Potential of Dialogue in a Municipal Development Project: Action Research and Planning Practice. [REVIEW] AI and Society 19 (4):464-484.score: 40.0
    This article applies reflexive and dialogue oriented approaches to municipal planning. Experience from the dialogical development process in Vennesla is discussed, highlighting the potential of collaborative work in a development coalition. Dialogue and democracy in the coalition are discussed, emphasising the social construction of meaning and knowledge.
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  39. Friedemann Pulvermüller Natalia Egorova, Yury Shtyrov (2013). Early and Parallel Processing of Pragmatic and Semantic Information in Speech Acts: Neurophysiological Evidence. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 36.0
    Although language is a tool for communication, most research in the neuroscience of language has focused on studying words and sentences, while little is known about the brain mechanisms of speech acts, or communicative functions, for which words and sentences are used as tools. Here the neural processing of two types of speech acts, Naming and Requesting, was addressed using the time-resolved event-related potential (ERP) technique. The brain responses for Naming and Request diverged as early as ~120 ms after the (...)
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  40. Sara J. Hanrahan, Bradley Greger, Rebecca A. Parker, Takahiro Ogura, Shinju Obara, Talmage D. Egan & Paul A. House (2013). The Effects of Propofol on Local Field Potential Spectra, Action Potential Firing Rate, and Their Temporal Relationship in Humans and Felines. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 34.0
  41. C. R. Gallistel (1981). Précis of Gallistel's The Organization of Action: A New Synthesis. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (4):609.score: 32.0
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  42. Rosa Cao (2012). A Teleosemantic Approach to Information in the Brain. Biology and Philosophy 27 (1):49-71.score: 30.0
    The brain is often taken to be a paradigmatic example of a signaling system with semantic and representational properties, in which neurons are senders and receivers of information carried in action potentials. A closer look at this picture shows that it is not as appealing as it might initially seem in explaining the function of the brain. Working from several sender-receiver models within the teleosemantic framework, I will first argue that two requirements must be met for a system to support (...)
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  43. David M. Kaplan & William Bechtel (2011). Dynamical Models: An Alternative or Complement to Mechanistic Explanations? Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (2):438-444.score: 30.0
    Abstract While agreeing that dynamical models play a major role in cognitive science, we reject Stepp, Chemero, and Turvey's contention that they constitute an alternative to mechanistic explanations. We review several problems dynamical models face as putative explanations when they are not grounded in mechanisms. Further, we argue that the opposition of dynamical models and mechanisms is a false one and that those dynamical models that characterize the operations of mechanisms overcome these problems. By briefly considering examples involving the generation (...)
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  44. Alfred R. Mele (2003). Intentional Action: Controversies, Data, and Core Hypotheses. Philosophical Psychology 16 (2):325-340.score: 30.0
    This article reviews some recent empirical work on lay judgments about what agents do intentionally and what they intend in various stories and explores its bearing on the philosophical project of providing a conceptual analysis of intentional action. The article is a case study of the potential bearing of empirical studies of a variety of folk concepts on philosophical efforts to analyze those concepts and vice versa. Topics examined include double effect; the influence of moral considerations on judgments about what (...)
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  45. Kenneth F. Schaffner (2008). Theories, Models, and Equations in Biology: The Heuristic Search for Emergent Simplifications in Neurobiology. Philosophy of Science 75 (5):1008-1021.score: 30.0
    This article considers claims that biology should seek general theories similar to those found in physics but argues for an alternative framework for biological theories as collections of prototypical interlevel models that can be extrapolated by analogy to different organisms. This position is exemplified in the development of the Hodgkin‐Huxley giant squid model for action potentials, which uses equations in specialized ways. This model is viewed as an “emergent unifier.” Such unifiers, which require various simplifications, involve the types of heuristics (...)
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  46. Anna Mudde (2009). Risky Subjectivity: Antigone, Action, and Universal Trespass. Human Studies 32 (2):183 - 200.score: 30.0
    In this paper, I draw on the mutually implicated structures of tragedy and self-formation found in Hegel’s use of Sophocles’ Antigone in the Phenomenology. By emphasizing the apparent distinction between particular and universal in Hegel’s reading of the tragedies in Antigone, I propose that a tragedy of action (which particularizes a universal) is inescapable for subjectivity understood as socially constituted and always already socially engaged. I consider universal/particular relations in three communities: Hegel’s Greek polis, his community of conscience, and my (...)
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  47. Jaak Panksepp (2000). Neural Behaviorism: From Brain Evolution to Human Emotion at the Speed of an Action Potential. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (2):212-213.score: 30.0
    Rolls shares important data on hunger, thirst, sexuality, and learned behaviors, but is it pertinent to understanding the fundamental nature of emotionality? Important as such work is for understanding the motivated behaviors of animals, Rolls builds a constructivist theory of emotions and primary-process affective consciousness without considering past evidence on specific types of emotional tendencies and their diverse neural substrates.
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  48. Laura Klaming & Pim Haselager (2013). Did My Brain Implant Make Me Do It? Questions Raised by DBS Regarding Psychological Continuity, Responsibility for Action and Mental Competence. Neuroethics 6 (3):527-539.score: 30.0
    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a well-accepted treatment for movement disorders and is currently explored as a treatment option for various neurological and psychiatric disorders. Several case studies suggest that DBS may, in some patients, influence mental states critical to personality to such an extent that it affects an individual’s personal identity, i.e. the experience of psychological continuity, of persisting through time as the same person. Without questioning the usefulness of DBS as a treatment option for various serious and treatment (...)
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  49. Ken Aizawa, Another Look at McCulloch and Pitts's “Logical Calculus”.score: 30.0
    To date, almost every historical examination of Warren McCulloch and Walter Pitts’s, “A Logical Calculus of the Ideas Immanent in Nervous Activity” has focused its attention on one dimension of their paper, namely, the attempt to relate neuronal action potentials to formulae in (an extension of) Boolean logic.[1] The implicit justification for this focus begins with the observation that this constitutes the most substantial conceptual innovation of the paper. Earlier work in theoretical neurophysiology had provided mathematical descriptions of neural networks (...)
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  50. B. I. B. Lindahl & P. Århem (1994). Mind as a Force Field: Comments on a New Interactionistic Hypothesis. Journal of Theoretical Biology 171:111-22.score: 30.0
    The survival and development of consciousness in biological evolution call for an explanation. An interactionistic mind-brain theory seems to have the greatest explanatory value in this context. An interpretation of an interactionistic hypothesis, recently proposed by Karl Popper, is discussed both theoretically and based on recent experimental data. In the interpretation, the distinction between the conscious mind and the brain is seen as a division into what is subjective and what is objective, and not as an ontological distinction between something (...)
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