Search results for 'ACTION-POTENTIALS' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. G. L. Freeman & L. H. Sharp (1941). Muscular Action Potentials and the Time-Error Function in Lifted Weight Judgments. Journal of Experimental Psychology 29 (1):23.score: 210.0
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  2. R. C. Davis (1938). The Relation of Muscle Action Potentials to Difficulty and Frustration. Journal of Experimental Psychology 23 (2):141.score: 210.0
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  3. Robert L. Henderson (1952). Remote Action Potentials at the Moment of Response in a Simple Reaction-Time Situation. Journal of Experimental Psychology 44 (4):238.score: 210.0
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  4. Walter W. Surwillo (1956). Psychological Factors in Muscle-Action Potentials: EMG Gradients. Journal of Experimental Psychology 52 (4):263.score: 210.0
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  5. James C. Diggory, Sherwin J. Klein & Malcolm Cohen (1964). Muscle-Action Potentials and Estimated Probability of Success. Journal of Experimental Psychology 68 (5):449.score: 210.0
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  6. W. A. Shaw & L. H. Kline (1947). A Study of Muscle Action Potentials During the Attempted Solution by Children of Problems of Increasing Difficulty. Journal of Experimental Psychology 37 (2):146.score: 210.0
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  7. R. S. Daniel (1939). The Distribution of Muscular Action Potentials During Maze Learning. Journal of Experimental Psychology 24 (6):621.score: 162.0
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  8. Mary E. Reuder (1956). The Effect of Ego Orientation and Problem Difficulty on Muscle Action Potentials. Journal of Experimental Psychology 51 (2):142.score: 162.0
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  9. S. R. Hathaway (1935). An Action Potential Study of Neuromuscular Relations. Journal of Experimental Psychology 18 (3):285.score: 130.0
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  10. [deleted]Hinrichs Hermann (2011). Action Control Related Local Field Potentials in the Human Pedunculopontine Nuclei: A Single Case Report. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5.score: 120.0
  11. [deleted]Thomas F. Münte, Marcus Heldmann, Hermann Hinrichs, Josep Marco-Pallares, Ulrike M. Krämer, Volker Sturm & Hans-Jochen Heinze (2007). Nucleus Accumbens is Involved in Human Action Monitoring: Evidence From Invasive Electrophysiological Recordings. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 2:11.score: 84.0
    The Nucleus accumbens (Nacc) has been proposed to act as a limbic-motor interface. Here, using invasive intraoperative recordings in an awake patient suffering from obsessive-compulsive disease (OCD), we demonstrate that its activity is modulated by the quality of performance of the subject in a choice reaction time task designed to tap action monitoring processes. Action monitoring, that is, error detection and correction, is thought to be supported by a system involving the dopaminergic midbrain, the basal ganglia, and the medial prefrontal (...)
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  12. John B. Fink (1954). Conditioning of Muscle Action Potential Increments Accompanying an Instructed Movement. Journal of Experimental Psychology 47 (2):61.score: 84.0
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  13. Joseph B. Sidowski & Robert G. Eason (1960). Drive, Verbal Performance, and Muscle Action Potential. Journal of Experimental Psychology 60 (6):365.score: 84.0
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  14. R. C. Davis (1943). The Design and Testing of Multiple Amplifiers for Action Potential Recording. Journal of Experimental Psychology 32 (3):270.score: 84.0
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  15. Donald G. Doehring (1957). Conditioning of Muscle Action Potential Responses Resulting From Passive Hand Movement. Journal of Experimental Psychology 54 (4):292.score: 84.0
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  16. John B. Fink & R. C. Davis (1951). Generalization of a Muscle Action Potential Response to Tonal Duration. Journal of Experimental Psychology 42 (6):403.score: 84.0
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  17. Benjamin W. Libet (1985). Unconscious Cerebral Initiative and the Role of Conscious Will in Voluntary Action. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (4):529-66.score: 78.0
    Voluntary acts are preceded by electrophysiological (RPs). With spontaneous acts involving no preplanning, the main negative RP shift begins at about200 ms. Control experiments, in which a skin stimulus was timed (S), helped evaluate each subject's error in reporting the clock times for awareness of any perceived event.
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  18. Arnon Levy (2013). What Was Hodgkin and Huxley's Achievement? British Journal for the Philosophy of Science (3):axs043.score: 74.0
    The Hodgkin–Huxley (HH) model of the action potential is a theoretical pillar of modern neurobiology. In a number of recent publications, Carl Craver ([2006], [2007], [2008]) has argued that the model is explanatorily deficient because it does not reveal enough about underlying molecular mechanisms. I offer an alternative picture of the HH model, according to which it deliberately abstracts from molecular specifics. By doing so, the model explains whole-cell behaviour as the product of a mass of underlying low-level events. The (...)
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  19. Carl F. Craver (2008). Physical Law and Mechanistic Explanation in the Hodgkin and Huxley Model of the Action Potential. Philosophy of Science 75 (5):1022-1033.score: 72.0
    Hodgkin and Huxley’s model of the action potential is an apparent dream case of covering‐law explanation in biology. The model includes laws of physics and chemistry that, coupled with details about antecedent and background conditions, can be used to derive features of the action potential. Hodgkin and Huxley insist that their model is not an explanation. This suggests either that subsuming a phenomenon under physical laws is insufficient to explain it or that Hodgkin and Huxley were wrong. I defend Hodgkin (...)
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  20. Carl Craver, Why the Hodgkin and Huxely Model Does Not Explain the Action Potential.score: 72.0
    Hodgkin and Huxley’s 1952 model of the action potential is an apparent dream case of covering-law explanation. The model appeals to general laws of physics and chemistry (specifically, Ohm’s law and the Nernst equation), and the laws, coupled with details about antecedent and background conditions, entail many of the significant properties of the action potential. However, Hodgkin and Huxley insist that their model falls short of an explanation. This historical fact suggests either that there is more to explaining the action (...)
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  21. Daniel von Wachter, Libet's Experiment Provides No Evidence Against Strong Libertarian Free Will Because Readiness Potentials Do Not Cause Our Actions.score: 72.0
    This article argues against Benjamin Libet’s claim that his experiment has shown that our actions are caused by brain events which begin before we decide and before we even think about the action. It assumes, contra the com- patibilists and pro Libet, that this claim is incompatible with free will. It clarifies what exactly should be meant by saying that the readiness potential causes, initiates, or pre- pares an action. It shows why Libet’s experiment does not support his claim and (...)
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  22. [deleted]Hans-Jochen Heinze, Marcus Heldmann, Jürgen Voges, Hermann Hinrichs, Josep Marco-Pallares, Jens-Max Hopf, Ulf Müller, Imke Galazky, Volker Sturm, Bernhard Bogerts & Thomas F. Münte (2009). Counteracting Incentive Sensitization in Severe Alcohol Dependence Using Deep Brain Stimulation of the Nucleus Accumbens: Clinical and Basic Science Aspects. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 3:22.score: 72.0
    The ventral striatum / nucleus accumbens has been implicated in the craving for drugs and alcohol which is a major reason for relapse of addicted people. Craving might be induced by drug-related cues. This suggests that disruption of craving-related neural activity in the nucleus accumbens may significantly reduce craving in alcohol-dependent patients. Here we report on preliminary clinical and neurophysiological evidence in three male patients who were treated with high frequency deep brain stimulation of the nucleus accumbens bilaterally. All three (...)
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  23. [deleted]Davide Rigoni, Marcel Brass & Giuseppe Sartori (2010). Post-Action Determinants of the Reported Time of Conscious Intentions. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 4.score: 66.0
    The question of whether our behaviour is guided by our conscious intentions is gaining momentum within the field of cognitive neuroscience. It has been demonstrated that the subjective experience that conscious intentions are the driving force of our actions, is built partially on a post hoc reconstruction. Our hypothesis was that this reconstructive process is mediated by an action-monitoring system that compares the predicted and the actual sensory consequences of an action. We applied Event Related Potentials (ERP) to a variant (...)
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  24. [deleted]Stefan Dürschmid, Tino Zaehle, Klaus Kopitzki, Jürgen Voges, Friedhelm Carl Schmitt, Hans-Jochen Heinze, Robert T. Knight & Hermann Hinrichs (2013). Phase-Amplitude Cross-Frequency Coupling in the Human Nucleus Accumbens Tracks Action Monitoring During Cognitive Control. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 66.0
    The Nucleus Accumbens (NAcc) is an important structure for the transfer of information between cortical and subcortical structures, especially the prefrontal cortex and the hippocampus. However, the mechanism that allows the NAcc to achieve this integration is not well understood. Phase-amplitude cross-frequency coupling (PAC) of oscillations in different frequency bands has been proposed as an effective mechanism to form functional networks to optimize transfer and integration of information. Here we assess PAC between theta and high gamma oscillations as a potential (...)
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  25. Marcel Weber (2005). Indeterminism in Neurobiology. Philosophy of Science 72 (5):663-674.score: 60.0
    I examine different arguments that could be used to establish indeterminism of neurological processes. Even though scenarios where single events at the molecular level make the difference in the outcome of such processes are realistic, this falls short of establishing indeterminism, because it is not clear that these molecular events are subject to quantum mechanical uncertainty. Furthermore, attempts to argue for indeterminism autonomously (i.e., independently of quantum mechanics) fail, because both deterministic and indeterministic models can account for the empirically observed (...)
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  26. P. Fries (2005). A Mechanism for Cognitive Dynamics: Neuronal Communication Through Neuronal Coherence. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 9 (10):474-480.score: 60.0
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  27. Henry D. Meyer (1949). Reaction Time as Related to Tensions in Muscles Not Essential in the Reaction. Journal of Experimental Psychology 39 (1):96.score: 60.0
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  28. Roland C. Davis (1948). Motor Effects of Strong Auditory Stimuli. Journal of Experimental Psychology 38 (3):257.score: 60.0
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  29. Roland C. Davis (1950). Motor Responses to Auditory Stimuli Above and Below Threshold. Journal of Experimental Psychology 40 (1):107.score: 60.0
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  30. Jens Kristian Fosse (2005). The Potential of Dialogue in a Municipal Development Project: Action Research and Planning Practice. [REVIEW] AI and Society 19 (4):464-484.score: 60.0
    This article applies reflexive and dialogue oriented approaches to municipal planning. Experience from the dialogical development process in Vennesla is discussed, highlighting the potential of collaborative work in a development coalition. Dialogue and democracy in the coalition are discussed, emphasising the social construction of meaning and knowledge.
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  31. G. L. Freeman (1940). Cortical Autonomous Rhythms and the Excitatory Levels of Other Bodily Tissues. Journal of Experimental Psychology 27 (2):160-171.score: 60.0
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  32. Charles R. Galbrecht, Roscoe A. Dykman, William G. Reese & Tetsuko Suzuki (1965). Intrasession Adaptation and Intersession Extinction of the Components of the Orienting Response. Journal of Experimental Psychology 70 (6):585.score: 60.0
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  33. [deleted]Sara J. Hanrahan, Bradley Greger, Rebecca A. Parker, Takahiro Ogura, Shinju Obara, Talmage D. Egan & Paul A. House (2013). The Effects of Propofol on Local Field Potential Spectra, Action Potential Firing Rate, and Their Temporal Relationship in Humans and Felines. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 54.0
  34. Dorothea Hämmerer, Guido Biele, Viktor Müller, Holger Thiele, Peter Nürnberg, Hauke R. Heekeren & Shu-Chen Li (2013). Effects of PPP1R1B (DARPP-32) Polymorphism on Feedback-Related Brain Potentials Across the Life Span. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 54.0
    Maximizing gains during probabilistic reinforcement learning requires the updating of choice–outcome expectations at the time when the feedback about a specific choice or action is given. Extant theories and evidence suggest that dopaminergic modulation plays a crucial role in reinforcement learning and the updating of choice–outcome expectations. Furthermore, recently a positive component of the event-related potential (ERP) about 200 msec (P2) after feedback has been suggested to reflect such updating. The efficacy of dopaminergic modulation changes across the life span. However, (...)
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  35. [deleted]G. A. Ojemann, J. Ojemann & N. F. Ramsey (2012). Relation Between Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) and Single Neuron, Local Field Potential (LFP) and Electrocorticography (ECoG) Activity in Human Cortex. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:34-34.score: 52.0
    The relation between changes in the blood oxygen dependent metabolic changes imaged by fMRI and neural events directly recorded from human cortex from single neurons, LFPs and ECoG is critically reviewed, based on the published literature including findings from the authors’ laboratories. All these data are from special populations, usually patients with medically refractory epilepsy, as this provides the major opportunity for direct cortical neuronal recording in humans. For LFP and ECoG changes are often sought in different frequency bands, for (...)
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  36. Jaak Panksepp (2000). Neural Behaviorism: From Brain Evolution to Human Emotion at the Speed of an Action Potential. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (2):212-213.score: 50.0
    Rolls shares important data on hunger, thirst, sexuality, and learned behaviors, but is it pertinent to understanding the fundamental nature of emotionality? Important as such work is for understanding the motivated behaviors of animals, Rolls builds a constructivist theory of emotions and primary-process affective consciousness without considering past evidence on specific types of emotional tendencies and their diverse neural substrates.
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  37. Domingo J. Louis-Martinez (2012). Relativistic Action at a Distance and Fields. Foundations of Physics 42 (2):215-223.score: 50.0
    After a brief review of the field formulations and the relativistic non-instantaneous action-at-a-distance formulations of some well known classical theories, we study Rivacoba’s generalization of a theory with a linearly rising potential as a relativistic non-instantaneous action-at-a-distance theory. For this case we construct the corresponding field theory, which turns out to coincide with a model proposed by Kiskis to describe strong interactions. We construct the action functional for this field theory. Although this model belongs to the class of Lagrangian theories (...)
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  38. Arnaud Boutin, Yannick Blandin, Cristina Massen, Herbert Heuer & Arnaud Badets (2014). Conscious Awareness of Action Potentiates Sensorimotor Learning. Cognition 133 (1):1-9.score: 50.0
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  39. Janeen D. Loehr (2013). Sensory Attenuation for Jointly Produced Action Effects. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 50.0
    Successful joint action often requires people to distinguish between their own and others’ contributions to a shared goal. One mechanism that is thought to underlie a self-other distinction is sensory attenuation, whereby the sensory consequences of one’s own actions are reduced compared to other sensory events. Previous research has shown that the auditory N1 event-related potential (ERP) response is reduced for self-generated compared to externally-generated tones. The current study examined whether attenuation also occurs for jointly-generated tones, which require two people (...)
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  40. D. A. McCormick (1999). Membrane Potential and Action Potential. In M. J. Zigmond & F. E. Bloom (eds.), Fundamental Neuroscience. 129--154.score: 50.0
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  41. Jody L. Stark (2014). The Potential of Deweyan-Inspired Action Research. Education and Culture 30 (2):87-101.score: 48.0
    This article examines the potential of Action Research informed by Dewey’s pragmatism as a research methodology in the social sciences. Not only a philosophical orientation, pragmatism is also a powerful mode of inquiry. When combined with the democratic research approach of Action Research, Deweyan pragmatism has great potential to shed light on educational and other social science questions, forward social change, and enact Dewey’s vision of radical social democracy. Although Dewey’s philosophy, one could argue, has never been mainstream in education (...)
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  42. [deleted]Luisa Sartori, Chiara Begliomini & Umberto Castiello (2013). Motor Resonance in Left- and Right-Handers: Evidence for Effector-Independent Motor Representations. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 48.0
  43. Walter Freeman (2014). Consciousness Began with a Hunter's Plan. Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 10 (1):140-148.score: 42.0
    Animals search for food and shelter by locomotion through time and space. The elemental step is the action-perception cycle, which has three steps. In the first step a volley of action potentials initiated by an act of search triggers the formation of a macroscopic wave packet that constitutes the memory of the stimulus. The wave packet is filtered and sent to the entorhinal cortex, where it is combined with wave packets from all sensory systems. This triggers the second step forming (...)
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  44. C. Lanczos (1972). Vector Potential and Quadratic Action. Foundations of Physics 2 (4):271-285.score: 42.0
    Einstein's linear Lagrangian is replaced by a Lagrangian which is quadratic in the curvature quantities (gauge invariance). The hypothesis is made that the basic metrical field is highly agitated (due to periodic boundary conditions) thus establishing a submicroscopic basic lattice structure of the space-time world which, however, is macroscopically isotropic. All consequences follow from these assumptions. The “free vector” of Einstein's theory (void of physical significance and used for the normalization of the reference system) is no longer free but of (...)
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  45. Diana PhD Deacon, John F. Shelley-Tremblay, Walter Ritter & Anna Dynowska (2013). Electrophysiological Evidence for the Action of a Center-Surround Mechanism on Semantic Processing in the Left Hemisphere. Frontiers in Psychology 4:936.score: 42.0
    Physiological evidence was sought for a center-surround attentional mechanism (CSM), which has been proposed to assist in the retrieval of weakly activated items from semantic memory. The CSM operates by facilitating strongly related items in the “center” of the weakly activated area of semantic memory, and inhibiting less strongly related items in its “surround”. In this study weak activation was created by having subjects acquire the meanings of new words to a recall criterion of only 50%. Subjects who attained this (...)
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  46. [deleted]Margherita Melloni, Claudia Urbistondo, Lucas Sedeño, Carlos Gelormini, Rafael Kichic & Agustin Ibanez (2012). The Extended Fronto-Striatal Model of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder: Convergence From Event-Related Potentials, Neuropsychology and Neuroimaging. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 42.0
    In this work, we explored convergent evidence supporting the fronto-striatal model of obsessive-compulsive disorder (FSMOCD) and the contribution of event-related potential (ERP) studies to this model. First, we considered minor modifications to the FSMOCD model based on neuroimaging and neuropsychological data. We noted the brain areas most affected in this disorder -anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), basal ganglia (BG) and orbito-frontal cortex (OFC)- and their related cognitive functions, such as monitoring and inhibition. Then, we assessed the ERPs that are directly related (...)
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  47. M. F. Rushworth, M. E. Walton, S. W. Kennerley & D. M. Bannerman (2004). Action Sets and Decisions in the Medial Frontal Cortex. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 8 (9):410-417.score: 42.0
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  48. [deleted]Agustin Ibanez Margherita Melloni, Claudia Urbistondo, Lucas Sedeño, Carlos Gelormini, Rafael Kichic (2012). The Extended Fronto-Striatal Model of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder: Convergence From Event-Related Potentials, Neuropsychology and Neuroimaging. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 42.0
    In this work, we explored convergent evidence supporting the fronto-striatal model of obsessive-compulsive disorder (FSMOCD) and the contribution of event-related potential (ERP) studies to this model. First, we considered minor modifications to the FSMOCD model based on neuroimaging and neuropsychological data. We noted the brain areas most affected in this disorder -anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), basal ganglia (BG) and orbito-frontal cortex (OFC)- and their related cognitive functions, such as monitoring and inhibition. Then, we assessed the ERPs that are directly related (...)
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  49. G. P. Ginsburg (1985). The Analysis of Human Action: Current Status and Future Potential. In G. P. Ginsburg, Marylin Brenner & Mario von Cranach (eds.), Discovery Strategies in the Psychology of Action. Academic Press. 255--279.score: 42.0
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  50. Rasmus Karlsson (2012). Individual Guilt or Collective Progressive Action? Challenging the Strategic Potential of Environmental Citizenship Theory. Environmental Values 21 (4):459 - 474.score: 40.0
    While structural approaches to sustainability have remained unable to muster wider political support, green political theory has for some time taken a voluntarist turn, arguing that deep changes in attitudes and behaviour are necessary to reduce the ecological debt of the rich countries. Within environmental citizenship theory it is believed that justice requires each individual to start living within his or her 'ecological space'. Firmly rooted in the pollution paradigm, environmental citizenship theory holds that the path to sustainability goes through (...)
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