Search results for 'COMPLEMENTARITY (Physics)' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Shigeki Matsutani, Yoshihiro Onishi & Wave-Particle Complementarity (2004). List of Contents: Volume 16, Number 4, August 2003. Foundations of Physics 34 (1).score: 120.0
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  2. Harald Atmanspacher (2002). Weak Quantum Theory: Complementarity and Entanglement in Physics and Beyond. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 32 (3):379-406.score: 114.0
    The concepts of complementarity and entanglement are considered with respect to their significance in and beyond physics. A formally generalized, weak version of quantum theory, more general than ordinary quantum theory of physical systems, is outlined and tentatively applied to two examples.
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  3. Dugald Murdoch (1987). Niels Bohr's Philosophy of Physics. Cambridge University Press.score: 102.0
    Murdoch describes the historical background of the physics from which Bohr's ideas grew; he traces the origins of his idea of complementarity and discusses its meaning and significance. Special emphasis is placed on the contrasting views of Einstein, and the great debate between Bohr and Einstein is thoroughly examined. Bohr's philosophy is revealed as being much more subtle, and more interesting than is generally acknowledged.
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  4. H. Atmanspacher, H. Romer & H. Wallach (2006). Weak Quantum Theory: Formal Framework and Selected Applications. Weak Quantum Theory: Complementarity and Entanglement in Physics and Beyond. Foundations of Physics 32:379-406.score: 78.0
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  5. Henry J. Folse (1985). The Philosophy of Niels Bohr: The Framework of Complementarity. Sole Distributors for the U.S.A. And Canada, Elsevier Science Pub. Co..score: 78.0
  6. Christian Thomas Kohl (2008). Buddhism and Quantum Physics. Indian International Journal of Buddhist Studies 9 (2008):45-62.score: 72.0
    Abstract. Rudyard Kipling, the famous english author of « The Jungle Book », born in India, wrote one day these words: « Oh, East is East and West is West, and never the twain shall meet ». In my paper I show that Kipling was not completely right. I try to show the common ground between buddhist philosophy and quantum physics. There is a surprising parallelism between the philosophical concept of reality articulated by Nagarjuna and the physical concept of reality (...)
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  7. Christian Thomas Kohl (2007). Buddhism and Quantum Physics. A Strange Parallelism of Two Concepts of Reality. Contemporary Buddhism 8 (1):69-82.score: 72.0
    Rudyard Kipling, the famous English author of The 'Jungle Book', born in India, wrote one day these words: 'Oh, East is East and West is West, and never the twain shall meet'. In my Essay I show that Kipling was not completely right. I try to show the common ground between Buddhist philosophy and quantum physics. There is a surprising paralelism between the philosophical concept of reality articulated by Nagarjuna and the physical concept of reality implied by quantum physics. For (...)
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  8. Adolf Grünbaum (1957). I. Complementarity in Quantum Physics and its Philosophical Generalization. Journal of Philosophy 54 (23):713-727.score: 72.0
  9. David Corfield (2006). Complementarity and Convergence in the Philosophies of Mathematics and Physics. Metascience 15 (2):363-366.score: 72.0
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  10. Lai Pan-Chiu (2002). Buddhist-Christian Complementarity in the Perspective of Quantum Physics. Buddhist-Christian Studies 22 (1):149-162.score: 72.0
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  11. Arkady Plotnitsky (1999). Landscapes of Sibylline Strangeness: Complementarity, Quantum Measurement and Classical Physics. In S. Smets J. P. Van Bendegem G. C. Cornelis (ed.), Metadebates on Science. Vub-Press and Kluwer. 6--197.score: 72.0
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  12. I. A. Richards (1973). Complementarities: A Lecture Delivered at Birkbeck College, London, 28th June 1972 in Honour of the Late Professor C. A. Mace, Professor of Psychology, Birkbeck College, 1944-1961. [REVIEW] London,Birkbeck College.score: 66.0
     
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  13. Stefan Djupsjöbacka (2005). Dialogue in the Crisis of Representation: Realism and Antirealism in the Context of the Conversation Between Theologians and Quantum Physicists in Göttingen 1949-1961. Åbo Akademi University Press.score: 60.0
  14. John Honner (1987). The Description of Nature: Niels Bohr and the Philosophy of Quantum Physics. Oxford University Press.score: 54.0
    Niels Bohr, founding father of modern atomic physics and quantum theory, was as original a philosopher as he was a physicist. This study explores several dimensions of Bohr's vision: the formulation of quantum theory and the problems associated with its interpretation, the notions of complementarity and correspondence, the debates with Einstein about objectivity and realism, and his sense of the infinite harmony of nature. Honner focuses on Bohr's epistemological lesson, the conviction that all our description of nature is dependent (...)
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  15. Michael Cuffaro (2010). The Kantian Framework of Complementarity. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 41 (4):309-317.score: 54.0
    A growing number of commentators have, in recent years, noted the important affinities in the views of Immanuel Kant and Niels Bohr. While these commentators are correct, the picture they present of the connections between Bohr and Kant is painted in broad strokes; it is open to the criticism that these affinities are merely superficial. In this essay, I provide a closer, structural, analysis of both Bohr's and Kant's views that makes these connections more explicit. In particular, I demonstrate the (...)
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  16. Thilo Hinterberger & Nikolaus Stillfried (2013). The Concept of Complementarity and its Role in Quantum Entanglement and Generalized Entanglement. Axiomathes 23 (3):443-459.score: 54.0
    The term complementarity plays a central role in quantum physics, not least in various approaches to defining entanglement and the conditions for its occurrence. It has, however, been used in a variety of ways by different authors, denoting different concepts and relationships. Here we describe and clarify some of them and analyze the role they play with respect to the phenomenon of entanglement. Based on these considerations we discuss the recently proposed system-theoretical generalization of the concepts entanglement and (...) (Atmanspacher et al. in Found Phys 32(3):379–406, 2002; von Lucadou et al. in J Conscious Stud 14(4):50–74, 2007; Filk and Römer in Axiomathes 21(2):211–220, 2011; Walach and Von Stillfried in Axiomathes 21(2): 185–209, 2011). We hope that a clarification regarding the specific meaning of these terms can be useful to the growing engagement with this interesting hypothesis and its critical investigation. (shrink)
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  17. Niels Bohr (1963/1987). Essays 1958-1962 on Atomic Physics and Human Knowledge. Ox Bow Press.score: 54.0
    Quantum physics and philosophy--causality and complementarity -- The unit of human knowledge -- The connection between the sciences -- Light and life revisited -- The Rutherford memorial lecture 1958 -- The genesis of quantum mechanics -- The Solvay meetings and the development of quantum physics.
     
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  18. Thilo Hinterberger & Nikolaus von Stillfried (2013). The Concept of Complementarity and its Role in Quantum Entanglement and Generalized Entanglement. Axiomathes 23 (3):443-459.score: 54.0
    The term complementarity plays a central role in quantum physics, not least in various approaches to defining entanglement and the conditions for its occurrence. It has, however, been used in a variety of ways by different authors, denoting different concepts and relationships. Here we describe and clarify some of them and analyze the role they play with respect to the phenomenon of entanglement. Based on these considerations we discuss the recently proposed system-theoretical generalization of the concepts entanglement and (...) (Atmanspacher et al. in Found Phys 32(3):379–406, 2002; von Lucadou et al. in J Conscious Stud 14(4):50–74, 2007; Filk and Römer in Axiomathes 21(2):211–220, 2011; Walach and Von Stillfried in Axiomathes 21(2): 185–209, 2011). We hope that a clarification regarding the specific meaning of these terms can be useful to the growing engagement with this interesting hypothesis and its critical investigation. (shrink)
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  19. Arkady Plotnitsky (2006). Reading Bohr: Physics and Philosophy. Springer.score: 54.0
    Reading Bohr: Physics and Philosophy offers a new perspective on Niels Bohr's interpretation of quantum mechanics as complementarity, and on the relationships between physics and philosophy in Bohr's work, which has had momentous significance for our understanding of quantum theory and of the nature of knowledge in general. Philosophically, the book reassesses Bohr's place in the Western philosophical tradition, from Kant and Hegel on. Physically, it reconsiders the main issues at stake in the Bohr-Einstein confrontation and in the ongoing (...)
     
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  20. Simon Saunders (2005). Complementarity and Scientific Rationality. Foundations of Physics 35 (3):417-447.score: 48.0
    Bohr’s interpretation of quantum mechanics has been criticized as incoherent and opportunistic, and based on doubtful philosophical premises. If so Bohr’s influence, in the pre-war period of 1927–1939, is the harder to explain, and the acceptance of his approach to quantum mechanics over de Broglie’s had no reasonable foundation. But Bohr’s interpretation changed little from the time of its first appearance, and stood independent of any philosophical presuppositions. The principle of complementarity is itself best read as a conjecture of (...)
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  21. E. V. Flores & J. M. De Tata (2010). Complementarity Paradox Solved: Surprising Consequences. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 40 (11):1731-1743.score: 48.0
    Afshar et al. claim that their experiment shows a violation of the complementarity inequality. In this work, we study their claim using a modified Mach-Zehnder setup that represents a simpler version of the Afshar experiment. We find that our results are consistent with Afshar et al. experimental findings. However, we show that within standard quantum mechanics the results of the Afshar experiment do not lead to a violation of the complementarity inequality. We show that their claim originates from (...)
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  22. Harald Atmanspacher, Complementarity in Bistable Perception.score: 42.0
    The idea of complementarity already appears in William James’ (1890a, p. 206) Principles of Psychology in the chapter on “the relations of minds to other things”. Later, in 1927, Niels Bohr introduced complementarity as a fundamental concept in quantum mechanics. It refers to properties (observables) that a system cannot have simultaneously, and which cannot be simultaneously measured with arbitrarily high accuracy. Yet, in the context of classical physics they would both be needed for an exhaustive description of the (...)
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  23. Harald Atmanspacher (2006). Complementarity in Classical Dynamical Systems. Foundations of Physics 36 (2):291-306.score: 42.0
    The concept of complementarity, originally defined for non-commuting observables of quantum systems with states of non-vanishing dispersion, is extended to classical dynamical systems with a partitioned phase space. Interpreting partitions in terms of ensembles of epistemic states (symbols) with corresponding classical observables, it is shown that such observables are complementary to each other with respect to particular partitions unless those partitions are generating. This explains why symbolic descriptions based on an ad hoc partition of an underlying phase space description (...)
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  24. Chris Heunen (2012). Complementarity in Categorical Quantum Mechanics. Foundations of Physics 42 (7):856-873.score: 42.0
    We relate notions of complementarity in three layers of quantum mechanics: (i) von Neumann algebras, (ii) Hilbert spaces, and (iii) orthomodular lattices. Taking a more general categorical perspective of which the above are instances, we consider dagger monoidal kernel categories for (ii), so that (i) become (sub)endohomsets and (iii) become subobject lattices. By developing a ‘point-free’ definition of copyability we link (i) commutative von Neumann subalgebras, (ii) classical structures, and (iii) Boolean subalgebras.
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  25. G. S. Paraoanu (2011). Partial Measurements and the Realization of Quantum-Mechanical Counterfactuals. Foundations of Physics 41 (7):1214-1235.score: 42.0
    We propose partial measurements as a conceptual tool to understand how to operate with counterfactual claims in quantum physics. Indeed, unlike standard von Neumann measurements, partial measurements can be reversed probabilistically. We first analyze the consequences of this rather unusual feature for the principle of superposition, for the complementarity principle, and for the issue of hidden variables. Then we move on to exploring non-local contexts, by reformulating the EPR paradox, the quantum teleportation experiment, and the entanglement-swapping protocol for the (...)
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  26. Newton C. A. da Costa & Décio Krause, The Logic of Complementarity.score: 42.0
    This paper is the sequel of a previous one where we have introduced a paraconsistent logic termed paraclassical logic to deal with 'complementary propositions'. Here, we enlarge upon the discussion by considering certain 'meaning principles', which sanction either some restrictions of 'classical' procedures or the utilization of certain 'classical' incompatible schemes in the domain of the physical theories. Here, the term 'classical' refers to classical physics. Some general comments on the logical basis of a scientific theory are also put in (...)
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  27. Jairo Roldán-Charria (forthcoming). Indivisibility, Complementarity and Ontology: A Bohrian Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics. Foundations of Physics:1-21.score: 42.0
    The interpretation of quantum mechanics presented in this paper is inspired by two ideas that are fundamental in Bohr’s writings: indivisibility and complementarity. Further basic assumptions of the proposed interpretation are completeness, universality and conceptual economy. In the interpretation, decoherence plays a fundamental role for the understanding of measurement. A general and precise conception of complementarity is proposed. It is fundamental in this interpretation to make a distinction between ontological reality, constituted by everything that does not depend at (...)
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  28. Rom Harré (2006). Resolving the Emergence-Reduction Debate. Synthese 151 (3):499-509.score: 36.0
    The debate between emergentists and reductionists rests on the observation that in many situations, in which it seems desirable to work with a coherent and unified discourse, key predicates fall into different groups, such that pairs of members one taken from each group, cannot be co-predicated of some common subject. Must we settle for ‘island’ discourses in science and human affairs or is some route to a unified discourse still open? To make progress towards resolving the issue the conditions under (...)
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  29. Olivier Massin (2006). Complementarity Cannot Resolve the Emergence–Reduction Debate: Reply to Harré. Synthese 151 (3):511 - 517.score: 36.0
    Rom Harré thinks that the Emergence–Reduction debate, conceived as a vertical problem, is partly ill posed. Even if he doesn’t wholly reject the traditional definition of an emergent property as a property of a collection but not of its components, his point is that this definition doesn’t exhaust all the dimensions of emergence. According to Harré there is another kind (or dimension) of emergence, which we may call—somewhat paradoxically—“horizontal emergence”: two properties of a substance are horizontally emergent relative to each (...)
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  30. Jagdish Mehra (1987). Niels Bohr's Discussions with Albert Einstein, Werner Heisenberg, and Erwin Schrödinger: The Origins of the Principles of Uncertainty and Complementarity. Foundations of Physics 17 (5):461-506.score: 36.0
    In this paper, the main outlines of the discussions between Niels Bohr with Albert Einstein, Werner Heisenberg, and Erwin Schrödinger during 1920–1927 are treated. From the formulation of quantum mechanics in 1925–1926 and wave mechanics in 1926, there emerged Born's statistical interpretation of the wave function in summer 1926, and on the basis of the quantum mechanical transformation theory—formulated in fall 1926 by Dirac, London, and Jordan—Heisenberg formulated the uncertainty principle in early 1927. At the Volta Conference in Como in (...)
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  31. Andrei Khrennikov (2005). The Principle of Supplementarity: A Contextual Probabilistic Viewpoint to Complementarity, the Interference of Probabilities and Incompatibility of Variables in Quantum Mechanics. Foundations of Physics 35 (10):1655-1693.score: 36.0
  32. Pekka Lahti & Juha-Pekka Pellonpää (2010). On the Complementarity of the Quadrature Observables. Foundations of Physics 40 (9-10):1419-1428.score: 36.0
    In this paper we investigate the coupling properties of pairs of quadrature observables, showing that, apart from the Weyl relation, they share the same coupling properties as the position-momentum pair. In particular, they are complementary. We determine the marginal observables of a covariant phase space observable with respect to an arbitrary rotated reference frame, and observe that these marginal observables are unsharp quadrature observables. The related distributions constitute the Radon transform of a phase space distribution of the covariant phase space (...)
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  33. Andrea Bonaccorsi (2008). Search Regimes and the Industrial Dynamics of Science. Minerva 46 (3):285-315.score: 36.0
    The article addresses the issue of dynamics of science, in particular of new sciences born in twentieth century and developed after the Second World War (information science, materials science, life science). The article develops the notion of search regime as an abstract characterization of dynamic patterns, based on three dimensions: the rate of growth, the degree of internal diversity of science and the associated dynamics (convergent vs. proliferating), and the nature of complementarity. The article offers a conceptual discussion for (...)
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  34. Rom Harre (2006). Resolving the Emergence-Reduction Debate. Synthese 151 (3):499-509.score: 36.0
    The debate between emergentists and reductionists rests on the observation that in many situations, in which it seems desirable to work with a coherent and unified discourse, key predicates fall into different groups, such that pairs of members one taken from each group, cannot be co-predicated of some common subject. Must we settle for 'island' discourses in science and human affairs or is some route to a unified discourse still open? To make progress towards resolving the issue the conditions under (...)
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  35. Niels Bohr (1987). The Philosophical Writings of Niels Bohr. Ox Bow Press.score: 36.0
    v. 1. Atomic theory and the description of nature -- v. 2. Essays 1932-1957 on atomic physics and human knowledge -- v. 3. Essays 1958-1962 on atomic physics and human knowledge -- v. 4. Causality and complementarity.
     
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  36. Stanford Goldman (1971). The Mechanics of Individuality in Nature. Foundations of Physics 1 (4):395-408.score: 30.0
    Evidence is presented to support the hypothesis that there is a set of basically similar phenomena or characteristics of physics, biology, and sociology. Six of these are identified. Five of them are usually associated with quantum mechanics. They are the existence of eigenstates, transform domains, bosons and fermions, particles and antiparticles, and complementarity. The sixth, namely alternation of generation, is usually associated with biology. The hypothesis leads to some new points of view and interpretations in biology, sociology, and physics.
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  37. Newton C. A. da Costa & Décio Krause, Remarks on the Applications of Paraconsistent Logic to Physics.score: 30.0
    In this paper we make some general remarks on the use of non-classical logics, in particular paraconsistent logic, in the foundational analysis of physical theories. As a case-study, we present a reconstruction of P.\ -D.\ F\'evrier's 'logic of complementarity' as a strict three-valued logic and also a paraconsistent version of it. At the end, we sketch our own approach to complementarity, which is based on a paraconsistent logic termed 'paraclassical logic'.
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  38. André Mercier (1992). The Problem of the Imperfection of a World, Itself Created by a Perfect God. Foundations of Physics 22 (2):205-219.score: 30.0
    The two main arguments concern(1) the presence of an “enlightened complementarity” between philosophic (including scientific) and religious (not including mystic) thought, and(2) the necessity to postulate a “threefold relationship” whenever one is to gain knowledge of any kind. They are both inspired by physics (from Bohr's “strict complementarity”, resp. from Newton's fundamental postulate).God's perfection resides at least in Symmetry in a generalized (not restrictively spatial) sense. Yet, as the argument goes, Space does not “exist” as a thing. Consequently, (...)
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  39. Stanford Goldman (1973). The Mechanics of Individuality in Nature. II. Barriers, Cells, and Individuality. Foundations of Physics 3 (2):203-228.score: 30.0
    The cell theory of Schleiden and Schwann is generalized to the effect that throughout the natural world, in physics, biology, and sociopsychology, there is a widespread phenomenon of the existence of organized cells, whose organization is usually protected by barriers. These barriers exist not only in space, but in time and even in other domains. These barriers typically not only protect the organization within the cell from external disturbance, but they actively participate in reducing the internal disorganization. It appears that (...)
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  40. Arkady Plotnitsky (2003). Mysteries Without Mysticism and Correlations Without Correlata: On Quantum Knowledge and Knowledge in General. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 33 (11):1649-1689.score: 30.0
    Following Niels Bohr's interpretation of quantum mechanics as complementarity, this article argues that quantum mechanics may be seen as a theory of, in N. David Mermin's words, “correlations without correlata,” understood here as the correlations between certain physical events in the classical macro world that at the same time disallow us to ascertain their quantum-level correlata.
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  41. Slobodan Perovic (2008). Why Were Two Theories (Matrix Mechanics and Wave Mechanics) Deemed Logically Distinct, and yet Equivalent, in Quantum Mechanics? In Christopher Lehrer (ed.), First Annual Conference in the Foundations and History of Quantum Physics. Max Planck Institute for History of Science.score: 30.0
    A recent rethinking of the early history of Quantum Mechanics deemed the late 1920s agreement on the equivalence of Matrix Mechanics and Wave Mechanics, prompted by Schrödinger’s 1926 proof, a myth. Schrödinger supposedly failed to achieve the goal of proving isomorphism of the mathematical structures of the two theories, while only later developments in the early 1930s, especially the work of mathematician John von Neumman (1932) provided sound proof of equivalence. The alleged agreement about the Copenhagen Interpretation, predicated to a (...)
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  42. Ole Steuernagel (2007). Afshar's Experiment Does Not Show a Violation of Complementarity. Foundations of Physics 37 (9):1370-1385.score: 30.0
    A recent experiment performed by S. Afshar [first reported by M. Chown, New Sci. 183:30, 2004] is analyzed. It was claimed that this experiment could be interpreted as a demonstration of a violation of the principle of complementarity in quantum mechanics. Instead, it is shown here that it can be understood in terms of classical wave optics and the standard interpretation of quantum mechanics. Its performance is quantified and it is concluded that the experiment is suboptimal in the sense (...)
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  43. Th D. Angelidis (1977). Momentum Conservation Decides Heisenberg's Interpretation of the Uncertainty Formulas. Foundations of Physics 7 (5-6):431-449.score: 30.0
    The present thesis considers, in the light of Heisenberg's interpretation of the uncertainty formulas, the conditions necessary for the derivation of the quantitative statement or law of momentum conservation. The result of such considerations is a contradiction between the formalism of quantum physics and the asserted consequences of Heisenberg's interpretation. This contradiction decides against Heisenberg's interpretation of the uncertainty formulas on upholding that the formalism of quantum physics is both consistent and complete, at least insofar as the statement of momentum (...)
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  44. Michel Paty (1995). The Nature of Einstein's Objections to the Copenhagen Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics. Foundations of Physics 25 (1):183-204.score: 30.0
    In what follows, I examine three main points which may help us to understand the deep nature of Einstein's objections to quantum mechanics. After having played a fundamental pioneer role in the birth of quantum physics, Einstein was, as is well known, far less enthusiastic about its constitution as a quantum mechanics and, since 1927, he constantly argued against the pretention of its founders and proponents to have settled a definitive and complete theory. I emphasize first the importance of the (...)
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  45. Gennaro Auletta & Gino Tarozzi (2004). On the Physical Reality of Quantum Waves. Foundations of Physics 34 (11):1675-1694.score: 30.0
    The main interpretations of the quantum-mechanical wave function are presented emphasizing how they can be divided into two ensembles: The ones that deny and the other ones that attribute a form of reality to quantum waves. It is also shown why these waves cannot be classical and must be submitted to the restriction of the complementarity principle. Applying the concept of smooth complementarity, it is shown that there can be no reason to attribute reality only to the events (...)
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  46. Gerard ’T. Hooft (2011). A Class of Elementary Particle Models Without Any Adjustable Real Parameters. Foundations of Physics 41 (12):1829-1856.score: 30.0
    Conventional particle theories such as the Standard Model have a number of freely adjustable coupling constants and mass parameters, depending on the symmetry algebra of the local gauge group and the representations chosen for the spinor and scalar fields. There seems to be no physical principle to determine these parameters as long as they stay within certain domains dictated by the renormalization group. Here however, reasons are given to demand that, when gravity is coupled to the system, local conformal invariance (...)
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  47. Patrick A. Heelan (1970). Complementarity, Context Dependence, and Quantum Logic. Foundations of Physics 1 (2):95-110.score: 30.0
    Quantum-mechanical event descriptions are context-dependent descriptions. The role of quantum (nondistributive) logic is in the partial ordering of contexts rather than in the ordering of quantum-mechanical events. Moreover, the kind of quantum logic displayed by quantum mechanics can be easily inferred from the general notion of contextuality used in ordinary language. The formalizable core of Bohr's notion of complementarity is the type of context dependence discussed in this paper.
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  48. Chris Heunen, Klaas Landsman & Bas Spitters, The Principle of General Tovariance.score: 24.0
    We tentatively propose two guiding principles for the construction of theories of physics, which should be satisfied by a possible future theory of quantum gravity. These principles are inspired by those that led Einstein to his theory of general relativity, viz. his principle of general covariance and his equivalence principle, as well as by the two mysterious dogmas of Bohr's interpretation of quantum mechanics, i.e. his doctrine of classical concepts and his principle of complementarity. An appropriate mathematical language for (...)
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  49. Rob Clifton (2004). Quantum Entanglements: Selected Papers. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    Rob Clifton was one of the most brilliant and productive researchers in the foundations and philosophy of quantum theory, who died tragically at the age of 38. Jeremy Butterfield and Hans Halvorson collect fourteen of his finest papers here, drawn from the latter part of his career (1995-2002), all of which combine exciting philosophical discussion with rigorous mathematical results. Many of these papers break wholly new ground, either conceptually or technically. Others resolve a vague controversy intoa precise technical problem, which (...)
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  50. Paul K. Feyerabend (1968). On a Recent Critique of Complementarity: Part I. Philosophy of Science 35 (4):309-331.score: 24.0
    Discussions of the interpretation of quantum theory are at present obstructed by (1) the increasing axiomania in physics and philosophy which replaces fundamental problems by problems of formulation within a certain preconceived calculus, and (2) the decreasing (since 1927) philosophical interest and sophistication both of professional physicists and of professional philosophers which results in the replacement of subtle positions by crude ones and of dialectical arguments by dogmatic ones. More especially, such discussions are obstructed by the ignorance of both opponents, (...)
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