Search results for 'Chan-Toon' (try it on Scholar)

572 found
Sort by:
  1. Wing-Shing Chan (2008). Psychological Attachment, No-Self and Chan Buddhist Mind Therapy. Contemporary Buddhism 9 (2):253-264.score: 180.0
  2. Wing-tsit Chan (1973). Chan Jo-Shui's Influence on Wang Yang-Ming. Philosophy East and West 23 (1/2):9-30.score: 180.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Wing‐Cheuk Chan (2013). The Thought of Mou Zongsan. By N. Serina Chan. (Leiden: Brill, 2011. 342 Pp. Hardback, ISBN 978‐900‐04‐21211‐4.). Journal of Chinese Philosophy 40 (1):208-211.score: 180.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Timothy Chan (ed.) (2013). The Aim of Belief. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    What is belief? "Beliefs aim at truth" is the commonly accepted starting point for philosophers who want to give an adequate account of this fundamental state of mind, but it raises as many questions as it answers. For example, in what sense can beliefs be said to have an aim of their own? If belief aims at truth, does it mean that reasons to believe must also be based on truth? Must beliefs be formed on the basis of evidence alone? (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Marjorie Chan (2002). Violations of Service Fairness and Legal Ramifications: The Case of the Managed Care Industry. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 36 (4):315 - 336.score: 60.0
    Adapted from Chan's (2000) model depicting success of litigation, this paper argues that with the application of various legislation, health maintenance organizations' (HMOs') violations of service fairness to each group: enrollees, physicians, and hospitals give rise to each group's lawsuits against the HMOs. Various authors (Bowen et al., 1999; Seiders and Berry, 1998) indicate that justice concepts such as distributive, procedural, and interactional justice can be applied to the area of service fairness. The violation of these underlying justice principles with (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Adam Toon (2010). Models as Make-Believe. In Roman Frigg & Matthew Hunter (eds.), Beyond Mimesis and Convention: Representation in Art and Science. Boston Studies in Philosophy of Science.score: 30.0
    In this paper I propose an account of representation for scientific models based on Kendall Walton’s ‘make-believe’ theory of representation in art. I first set out the problem of scientific representation and respond to a recent argument due to Craig Callender and Jonathan Cohen, which aims to show that the problem may be easily dismissed. I then introduce my account of models as props in games of make-believe and show how it offers a solution to the problem. Finally, I demonstrate (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Timothy Chan (2010). Moore's Paradox is Not Just Another Pragmatic Paradox. Synthese 173 (3):211 - 229.score: 30.0
    One version of Moore’s Paradox is the challenge to account for the absurdity of beliefs purportedly expressed by someone who asserts sentences of the form ‘p & I do not believe that p’ (‘Moorean sentences’). The absurdity of these beliefs is philosophically puzzling, given that Moorean sentences (i) are contingent and often true; and (ii) express contents that are unproblematic when presented in the third-person. In this paper I critically examine the most popular proposed solution to these two puzzles, according (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Ho Mun Chan (2004). Sharing Death and Dying: Advance Directives, Autonomy and the Family. Bioethics 18 (2):87–103.score: 30.0
  9. Adam Toon (2010). The Ontology of Theoretical Modelling: Models as Make-Believe. Synthese 172 (2):301-315.score: 30.0
    The descriptions and theoretical laws scientists write down when they model a system are often false of any real system. And yet we commonly talk as if there were objects that satisfy the scientists’ assumptions and as if we may learn about their properties. Many attempt to make sense of this by taking the scientists’ descriptions and theoretical laws to define abstract or fictional entities. In this paper, I propose an alternative account of theoretical modelling that draws upon Kendall Walton’s (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Timothy Chan (2008). Belief, Assertion and Moore's Paradox. Philosophical Studies 139 (3):395 - 414.score: 30.0
    In this article I argue that two received accounts of belief and assertion cannot both be correct, because they entail mutually contradictory claims about Moore’s Paradox. The two accounts in question are, first, the Action Theory of Belief (ATB), the functionalist view that belief must be manifested in dispositions to act, and second, the Belief Account of Assertion (BAA), the Gricean view that an asserter must present himself as believing what he asserts. It is generally accepted also that Moorean assertions (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Joseph Chan (2000). Legitimacy, Unanimity, and Perfectionism. Philosophy and Public Affairs 29 (1):5–42.score: 30.0
  12. Sarah Chan & John Harris (2007). In Support of Human Enhancement. Studies in Ethics, Law, and Technology 1 (1).score: 30.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Timothy Chan & Guy Kahane (2011). The Trouble with Being Sincere. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 41 (2):215-234.score: 30.0
    Questions about sincerity play a central role in our lives. But what makes an assertion insincere? In this paper we argue that the answer to this question is not as straightforward as it has sometimes been taken to be. Until recently the dominant answer has been that a speaker makes an insincere assertion if and only if he does not believe the proposition asserted. There are, however, persuasive counterexamples to this simple account. It has been proposed instead that an insincere (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. David K. Chan (2000). Intention and Responsibility in Double Effect Cases. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 3 (4):405-434.score: 30.0
    I argue that the moral distinction in double effect cases rests on a difference not in intention as traditionally stated in the Doctrine of Double Effect (DDE), but in desire. The traditional DDE has difficulty ensuring that an agent intends the bad effect just in those cases where what he does is morally objectionable. I show firstly that the mental state of a rational agent who is certain that a side-effect will occur satisfies Bratman's criteria for intending that effect. I (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Adam Toon (2011). Playing with Molecules. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 42 (4):580-589.score: 30.0
    Recent philosophy of science has seen a number of attempts to understand scientific models by looking to theories of fiction. In previous work, I have offered an account of models that draws on Kendall Walton’s ‘make-believe’ theory of art. According to this account, models function as ‘props’ in games of make-believe, like children’s dolls or toy trucks. In this paper, I assess the make-believe view through an empirical study of molecular models. I suggest that the view gains support when we (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Joseph Chan (2007). Democracy and Meritocracy: Toward a Confucian Perspective. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 34 (2):179–193.score: 30.0
  17. Sin Yee Chan (2000). Gender and Relationship Roles in the Analects and the Mencius. Asian Philosophy 10 (2):115 – 132.score: 30.0
    In this paper I argue that the conception of gender as illustrated in the Analects and the Mencius is basically a functional one that assigns women a domestic role. I show how this conception might imply the exclusion of women from the moral ideal of chun-tzu, which would result in the further subordination of women as wives to men as husbands in the context of the Confucian role system. On the other hand, I show how the Confucian role system can (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Ho Mun Chan (2005). Rawls' Theory of Justice: A Naturalistic Evaluation. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 30 (5):449 – 465.score: 30.0
  19. Sarah Chan & John Harris (2009). Free Riders and Pious Sons – Why Science Research Remains Obligatory. Bioethics 23 (3):161-171.score: 30.0
    John Harris has previously proposed that there is a moral duty to participate in scientific research. This concept has recently been challenged by Iain Brassington, who asserts that the principles cited by Harris in support of the duty to research fail to establish its existence. In this paper we address these criticisms and provide new arguments for the existence of a moral obligation to research participation. This obligation, we argue, arises from two separate but related principles. The principle of fairness (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. David K. Chan (2004). Are There Extrinsic Desires? Noûs 38 (2):326-50.score: 30.0
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Alan K. L. Chan (2000). Confucian Ethics and the Critique of Ideology. Asian Philosophy 10 (3):245 – 261.score: 30.0
    The debate between Hans-Georg Gadamer and Jürgen Habermas provides a fresh perspective from which Confucian philosophy may be approached. In this paper, focusing on the Lunyu (Analects), I argue that the sayings of Confucius reflect an essentially 'conservative' orientation, finding in tradition a reservoir of insight and truth. There is a critical dimension to it in that ethical reflection and self-cultivation would enable the individual to challenge particular claims of tradition. However, can self-cultivation transcend tradition as a whole and enable (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Timothy Chan (2013). Introduction: Aiming at Truth. In , The Aim of Belief. Oxford University Press. 1-16.score: 30.0
    In this introductory chapter to the volume The Aim of Belief, the editor surveys the fundamental questions in current debates surrounding the aim of belief, and identifies the major theoretical approaches. The main arguments of the ten contributions to the volume are outlined and located in the context of the existing literature.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Kam C. Chan, Hung-Gay Fung & Jot Yau (2013). Predominant Sources and Contributors of Influential Business Ethics Research: Evidence and Implications From a Threshold Citation Analysis. Business Ethics 22 (3):263-276.score: 30.0
    Influential or frequently cited business ethics research does not appear in a vacuum; our study reveals its predominant sources and contributors by discipline. By examining citations from articles published in three top business ethics journals (Journal of Business Ethics, Business Ethics Quarterly and Business Ethics: A European Review) over the period 2004–2008, we document that the preponderance of influential business ethics research comes primarily from the management faculty. In addition, management journals and management books are the predominant sources for influential (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Wing-Cheuk Chan (2011). Mou Zongsan and Tang Junyi on Zhang Zai's and Wang Fuzhi's Philosophies of Qi : A Critical Reflection. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 10 (1):85-98.score: 30.0
    Fuzhi’s philosophies of qi. In this essay, both the strength and weakness of their interpretations will be critically examined. As a contrast, an alternative interpretation of the School of qi in Song-Ming Neo-Confucianism will be outlined. This new interpretation will uncover that, like Leibniz, Zhang Zai and Wang Fuzhi introduced a non-substantivalist approach in natural philosophy in terms of an innovative concept of force. This interpretation not only helps to show the limitations of Mou Zongsan’s and Tang Junyi’s understandings of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. David Kirsh, L. A. Lenert, W. G. Griswold, C. Buono, J. Lyon, R. Rao & T. C. Chan (2011). Design and Evaluation of a Wireless Electronic Health Records System for Field Care in Mass Casualty Settings. Journal of the American Medical Informatic Association 18 (6):842-852.score: 30.0
    There is growing interest in the use of technology to enhance the tracking and quality of clinical information available for patients in disaster settings. This paper describes the design and evaluation of the Wireless Internet Information System for Medical Response in Disasters (WIISARD).
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Y. H. Wong & Ricky Yee-kwong Chan (1999). Relationship Marketing in China: Guanxi, Favouritism and Adaptation. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 22 (2):107 - 118.score: 30.0
    One of the hot research topics today is relationship marketing. However, little research has been carried out in understanding the complex concepts of Guanxi (relationship) in a Chinese society. This research describes a study to operate the constructs of guanxi and explores the importance of guanxi in relationship development in order to present a new Guanxi framework. A study of both Western and Chinese literature provides foundations of the Guanxi perspectives. The constructs of adaptation, trust, opportunism and favour are identified. (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Ricky Y. K. Chan, Y. H. Wong & T. K. P. Leung (2008). Applying Ethical Concepts to the Study of “Green” Consumer Behavior: An Analysis of Chinese Consumers' Intentions to Bring Their Own Shopping Bags. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 79 (4):469 - 481.score: 30.0
    Drawing on the general ethics and social psychology literature, this study presents a model to delineate the major factors likely to affect consumers’ intentions to bring their own shopping bags when visiting a supermarket (called “bring your own bags” or “BYOB” intention). The model is empirically validated using a survey of 250 Chinese consumers. Overall, the findings support the hypothesized direct influence of teleological evaluation and habit on BYOB (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Shirley Chan (2009). Human Nature and Moral Cultivation in the Guodian 郭店 Text of the Xing Zi Ming Chu 性自命出 (Nature Derives From Mandate). Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 8 (4):361-382.score: 30.0
    The debate over whether human nature is good or bad and how this is related to self-cultivation was central in the minds of traditional Chinese thinkers. This essay analyzes the interrelationship between the key concepts of xing 性 (human nature), qing 情 (human emotions/feelings), and xin 心 (heart-mind) in the Guodian text of the Xing Zi Ming Chu 性自命出 (Nature Derives from Mandate) discovered in 1993 in Hubei province. The intellectual engagements evident in this Guodian text emerge as more syncretic (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Wing-Tsit Chan (1955). The Evolution of the Confucian Concept Jên. Philosophy East and West 4 (4):295-319.score: 30.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Gary Kok Yew chan (2008). The Relevance and Value of Confucianism in Contemporary Business Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 77 (3):347 - 360.score: 30.0
    This article examines the relevance and value of Confucian Ethics to contemporary Business Ethics by comparing their respective perspectives and approaches towards business activities within the modern capitalist framework, the principle of reciprocity and the concept of human virtues. Confucian Ethics provides interesting parallels with contemporary Western-oriented Business Ethics. At the same, it diverges from contemporary Business Ethics in some significant ways. Upon an examination of philosophical texts as well as empirical studies, it is argued that Confucian Ethics is able (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Sin Yee Chan (2006). The Confucian Notion of Jing (Respect). Philosophy East and West 56 (2):229 - 252.score: 30.0
    : Jing (respect) in ancient Confucianism can be seen as referring to either a frame of mind or an intentional state that includes the elements of singlemindedness, concentration, seriousness, caution, and a strong sense of responsibility. Hence, it can be seen as a due regard based on the perception of the worth of its object. It is the central element and the germ of li (ritual). A critical comparison is made between jing and the ideas of appraisal respect, recognition respect, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Marjorie Chan (2003). Corporate Espionage and Workplace Trust/Distrust. Journal of Business Ethics 42 (1):45 - 58.score: 30.0
    The central focus of this research is: The growing corporate espionage activities due to fierce competition lead to highly controlling security measures and intensive employee monitoring which bring about distrust in the workplace. The paper examines various research works on trust and distrust. It highlights the conflictful demands managers face. They have to deter espionage activities, but at the same time, build trusting relationships in the workplace. The paper also describes various operations, personnel, physical and technical countermeasuresto combat corporate espionage (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Sarah Chan & Muireann Quigley (2007). Frozen Embryos, Genetic Information and Reproductive Rights. Bioethics 21 (8):439–448.score: 30.0
    Recent ethical and legal challenges have arisen concerning the rights of individuals over their IVF embryos, leading to questions about how, when the wishes of parents regarding their embryos conflict, such situations ought to be resolved. A notion commonly invoked in relation to frozen embryo disputes is that of reproductive rights: a right to have (or not to have) children. This has sometimes been interpreted to mean a right to have, or not to have, one's own genetic children. But can (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Wing-cheuk Chan (2006). Mou Zongsan's Transformation of Kant's Philosophy. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 33 (1):125–139.score: 30.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Wing-cheuk Chan (2010). Yang, Zebo 楊澤波, an Examination of Mou Zongsan's Three-Fold Typology 牟宗三三系論論衡. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 9 (1):133-136.score: 30.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Kai M. A. Chan (2003). Intransitivity and Future Generations: Debunking Parfit's Mere Addition Paradox. Journal of Applied Philosophy 20 (2):187–200.score: 30.0
  37. Joseph Chan (2002). Moral Autonomy, Civil Liberties, and Confucianism. Philosophy East and West 52 (3):281-310.score: 30.0
    Three claims are defended. (1) There is a conception of moral autonomy in Confucian ethics that to a degree can support toleration and freedom. However, (2) Confucian moral autonomy is different from personal autonomy, and the latter gives a stronger justification for civil and personal liberties than does the former. (3) The contemporary appeal of Confucianism would be strengthened by including personal autonomy, and this need not be seen as forsaking Confucian ethics but rather as an internal revision in response (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Sarah Chan & John Harris (2009). Consequentialism Without Consequences: Ethics and Embryo Research. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 19 (01):61-.score: 30.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Ho Mun Chan (2004). Informed Consent Hong Kong Style: An Instance of Moderate Familism. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 29 (2):195 – 206.score: 30.0
    This paper examines the practice of informed consent in Hong Kong by drawing on structured interviews conducted with eleven physicians, three patients, and four family members primarily at a well-established public hospital in Hong Kong. The findings of this study show that the Hong Kong approach to medical decision-making lies somewhere between that of America on the one hand, and mainland China on the other. It is argued that the practice of medical decision-making in Hong Kong can be modeled by (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Allan K. K. Chan, Po-Keung Ip & Kit-Chun Joanna Lam (2009). Business Ethics in Greater China: An Introduction. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 88 (1):1 - 9.score: 30.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Ho Mun Chan & Hektor K. T. Yan (2007). Is There a Geography of Thought for East-West Differences? Why or Why Not? Educational Philosophy and Theory 39 (4):383–403.score: 30.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. David K. Chan (ed.) (2008). Moral Psychology Today: Essays on Values, Rational Choice, and the Will. Springer Verlag.score: 30.0
    This volume is an edited collection of original papers on the theme of Values, Rational Choice, and the Will.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Alex W. H. Chan & Hoi Yan Cheung (2012). Cultural Dimensions, Ethical Sensitivity, and Corporate Governance. Journal of Business Ethics 110 (1):45-59.score: 30.0
    The economic globalization process has integrated different competitive markets and pushes firms in different countries to improve their managerial and operational efficiencies. Given the recent empirical evidence for the benefits to firms and stakeholders of good corporate governance (CG) practice, it is expected that good CG practice would be a common strategy for firms in different countries to meet the increasingly intense competition; however, this is not the case. This study examines the differences in CG practices in firms across different (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Wing-Tsit Chan (1957). Neo-Confucianism and Chinese Scientific Thought. Philosophy East and West 6 (4):309-332.score: 30.0
  45. Wing-cheuk Chan (2010). Two Dogmas of Critical Buddhism. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 37 (2):276-294.score: 30.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Wing-tsit Chan (1963). A Source Book in Chinese Philosophy. Princeton, N.J.,Princeton University Press.score: 30.0
    This Source Book is devoted to the purpose of providing such a basis for genuine understanding of Chinese thought (and thereby of Chinese life and culture, ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. David K. Chan (2005). Active Voluntary Euthanasia and the Problem of Intending Death. Journal of Philosophical Research 30 (Supplement):379-389.score: 30.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Kam C. Chan, Hung-Gay Fung & Jot Yau (2010). Business Ethics Research: A Global Perspective. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 95 (1):39 - 53.score: 30.0
    Using 10 years of publication data (1999-2008) from 10 leading business ethics journals, we examine global patterns of business ethics research and contributing institutions and scholars. Although U.S. academic institutions continue to lead in the contributions toward business ethics research, Asian and European institutions have made significant progress. Our study shows that business ethics research output is closely linked to the missions of the institutions driven by their values or religious belief. An additional analysis of the productivity of each highly (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Adam Toon (2012). Similarity and Scientific Representation. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 26 (3):241-257.score: 30.0
    The similarity view of scientific representation has recently been subjected to strong criticism. Much of this criticism has been directed against a ?naive? similarity account, which tries to explain representation solely in terms of similarity between scientific models and the world. This article examines the more sophisticated account offered by the similarity view's leading proponent, Ronald Giere. In contrast to the naive account, Giere's account appeals to the role played by the scientists using a scientific model. A similar move is (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Alan K. L. Chan (2011). Interpretations of Virtue (de) in Early China. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (1):134-150.score: 30.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 572