Search results for 'ELEMENT-BINDING PROTEIN' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Syed Hasan Arif (2009). A Ca2+‐Binding Protein with Numerous Roles and Uses: Parvalbumin in Molecular Biology and Physiology. Bioessays 31 (4):410-421.score: 70.0
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  2. John Bickle (2006). Reducing Mind to Molecular Pathways: Explicating the Reductionism Implicit in Current Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience. [REVIEW] Synthese 151 (3):411-434.score: 60.0
    As opposed to the dismissive attitude toward reductionism that is popular in current philosophy of mind, a “ruthless reductionism” is alive and thriving in “molecular and cellular cognition”—a field of research within cellular and molecular neuroscience, the current mainstream of the discipline. Basic experimental practices and emerging results from this field imply that two common assertions by philosophers and cognitive scientists are false: (1) that we do not know much about how the brain works, and (2) that lower-level neuroscience cannot (...)
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  3. James B. Hurley (1995). Recoverin, a Calcium-Binding Protein in Photoreceptors. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (3):497-498.score: 56.0
    Recoverin is a Ca2+-binding protein found primarily in vertebrate photoreceptors. The proposed physiological function of recoverin is based on the finding that recoverin inhibits light-stimulated phosphorylation of rhodopsin. Recoverin interacts with rod outer segment membranes in a Ca2+-dependent manner. This interaction requires N-terminal acylation of recoverin. Four types of fatty acids have been detected on the N-terminus of recoverin, but the functional significance of this heterogeneous acylation is not yet clear.
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  4. Igor F. Zhimulev, Elena S. Belyaeva, Tatiana Yu Vatolina & Sergey A. Demakov (2012). Banding Patterns in Drosophila Melanogaster Polytene Chromosomes Correlate with DNA‐Binding Protein Occupancy. Bioessays 34 (6):498-508.score: 44.0
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  5. Katia Ancelin, Christine Brun & Eric Gilson (1998). Role of the Telomeric DNA‐Binding Protein TRF2 in the Stability of Human Chromosome Ends. Bioessays 20 (11):879-883.score: 42.0
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  6. John W. Chase (1984). The Role of E. Coli Single‐Stranded DNA Binding Protein in DNA Metabolism. Bioessays 1 (5):218-222.score: 42.0
  7. Edward Chu & Carmen J. Allegra (1996). The Role of Thymidylate Synthase as an RNA Binding Protein. Bioessays 18 (3):191-198.score: 42.0
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  8. Julie Deschênes‐Furry, Nora Perrone‐Bizzozero & Bernard J. Jasmin (2006). The RNA‐Binding Protein HuD: A Regulator of Neuronal Differentiation, Maintenance and Plasticity. Bioessays 28 (8):822-833.score: 42.0
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  9. Evelync Friederich, Eric Pringault, Monique Arpin & Daniel Louvard (1990). From the Structure to the Function of Villin, an Actin‐Binding Protein of the Brush Border. Bioessays 12 (9):403-408.score: 42.0
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  10. Kimitoshi Kohno, Hiroto Izumi, Takeshi Uchiumi, Megumi Ashizuka & Michihiko Kuwano (2003). The Pleiotropic Functions of the Y‐Box‐Binding Protein, YB‐1. Bioessays 25 (7):691-698.score: 42.0
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  11. Michael J. B. Krieger (2005). To B or Not to B: A Pheromone‐Binding Protein Regulates Colony Social Organization in Fire Ants. Bioessays 27 (1):91-99.score: 42.0
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  12. M. J. Krleger (2004). To H or Not to B: A Pheromone—Binding Protein Re-at Os Colony Social Organization I Nf Ire a Nts. Bioessays 27:9.score: 42.0
     
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  13. Maureen McLeod (1989). Regulation of Meiosis: From DNA Binding Protein to Protein Kinase. Bioessays 11 (1):9-14.score: 42.0
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  14. Melissa Little, Greg Holmes & Patrick Walsh (1999). WT1: What has the Last Decade Told Us? Bioessays 21 (3):191-202.score: 40.0
    When positionally cloned in late 1989, it was anticipated that mutations within the Wilms' tumour suppressor gene (WT1) would prove responsible for this common solid kidney cancer of childhood. Characterisation of the WT1 expression pattern and of the structure of the encoded protein isoforms and their mode of action has now spanned almost a decade. WT1 proteins act as nucleic acid-binding zinc finger-containing transcription factors involved in both transactivation and repression. These activities are facilitated and constrained by interactions with (...)
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  15. Stuart K. Archer, Charles Claudianos & Hugh D. Campbell (2005). Evolution of the Gelsolin Family of Actin-Binding Proteins as Novel Transcriptional Coactivators. Bioessays 27 (4):388-396.score: 38.7
    The gelsolin gene family encodes a number of higher eukaryotic actin-binding proteins that are thought to function in the cytoplasm by severing, capping, nucleating or bundling actin filaments. Recent evidence, however, suggests that several members of the gelsolin family may have adopted unexpected nuclear functions including a role in regulating transcription. In particular, flightless I, supervillin and gelsolin itself have roles as coactivators for nuclear receptors, despite the fact that their divergence appears to predate the evolutionary appearance of nuclear receptors. (...)
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  16. Ronald E. Hileman, Jonathan R. Fromm, John M. Weiler & Robert J. Linhardt (1998). Glycosaminoglycan‐Protein Interactions: Definition of Consensus Sites in Glycosaminoglycan Binding Proteins. Bioessays 20 (2):156-167.score: 38.0
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  17. Susan P. C. Cole & Roger G. Deeley (1998). Multidrug Resistance Mediated by the ATP‐Binding Cassette Transporter Protein MRP. Bioessays 20 (11):931-940.score: 36.0
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  18. Susan Jaken & Peter J. Parker (2000). Protein Kinase C Binding Partners. Bioessays 22 (3):245-254.score: 36.0
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  19. Martino Mona (2008). Binding Consent or Element of Presumed Consent? Conceptualization and Legal Relevance of Advance Health Care Directives in the Context of Multicultural Bioethics. Ethik in der Medizin 20 (3):248-257.score: 36.0
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  20. Ken Aizawa, A Reply to Bechtel and Mundale.score: 29.3
    One theme in recent philosophical attention to neuroscience has been that closer, more serious attention to actual neuroscientific research, and its results, challenges the familiar view that psychological properties are multiply realized by neuroscientific properties. Shagrir, (1998), presents a number of diverse reasons to think that diversity in neuroscientifically identified structures and properties does not inevitably lead to multiple realization. Bechtel and Mundale, (1999), argue that neuroscientific practice extending over a century contradicts the consequences of the hypothesis that psychological functions (...)
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  21. John Dempsher (1982). Basic Function in the Nervous System - a Unified Theory. Acta Biotheoretica 31 (3).score: 29.0
    A new theory for basic function in the nervous system has recently been proposed (Dempsher, J., 1979a, 1979b; 1980, 1981). The major basic themes of the new theory are as follows: (1) There are two fundamental units of structure and function, the fibre or conducting mechanism, and the neurocentre, where nervous system function as we know it takes place. (2) The nerve impulse is regarded as a mathematical event. The mathematics is the result of a prescribed fusion of energy and (...)
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  22. Alexander Dibrov, Yvonne Myal & Etienne Leygue (2009). Computational Modelling of Protein Interactions: Energy Minimization for the Refinement and Scoring of Association Decoys. Acta Biotheoretica 57 (4).score: 21.0
    The prediction of proteinprotein interactions based on independently obtained structural information for each interacting partner remains an important challenge in computational chemistry. Procedures where hypothetical interaction models (or decoys) are generated, then ranked using a biochemically relevant scoring function have been garnering interest as an avenue for addressing such challenges. The program PatchDock has been shown to produce reasonable decoys for modeling the association between pig alpha-amylase and the VH-domains of camelide antibody raised against it. We designed a (...)
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  23. Michael Doyle, Lukas Badertscher, Lukasz Jaskiewicz, Stephan Güttinger, Sabine Jurado, Tabea Hugenschmidt, Ulrike Kutay & Witold Filipowicz, The Double-Stranded RNA Binding Domain of Human Dicer Functions as a Nuclear Localization Signal.score: 21.0
    Dicer is a key player in microRNA (miRNA) and RNA interference (RNAi) pathways, processing miRNA precursors and doublestranded RNA into ~21-nt-long products ultimately triggering sequence-dependent gene silencing. Although processing of substrates in vertebrate cells occurs in the cytoplasm, there is growing evidence suggesting Dicer is also present and functional in the nucleus. To address this possibility, we searched for a nuclear localization signal (NLS) in human Dicer and identified its C-terminal double-stranded RNA binding domain (dsRBD) as harboring NLS activity. We (...)
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  24. Rosanna K. Olsen, Sandra N. Moses, Lily Riggs & Jennifer D. Ryan (2012). The Hippocampus Supports Multiple Cognitive Processes Through Relational Binding and Comparison. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 21.0
    It has been well established that the hippocampus plays a pivotal role in explicit long-term recognition memory. However, findings from amnesia, lesion and recording studies with non-human animals, eye-movement recording studies, and functional neuroimaging have recently converged upon a similar message: the functional reach of the hippocampus extends far beyond explicit recognition memory. Damage to the hippocampus affects performance on a number of cognitive tasks including recognition memory after short and long delays and visual discrimination. Additionally, with the advent of (...)
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  25. Joanna Bandorowicz‐Pikula, Rene Buchet & Slawomir Pikula (2001). Annexins as Nucleotide‐Binding Proteins: Facts and Speculations. Bioessays 23 (2):170-178.score: 20.0
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  26. Xose R. Bustelo, Vincent Sauzeau & Inmaculada M. Berenjeno (2007). GTP‐Binding Proteins of the Rho/Rac Family: Regulation, Effectors and Functions in Vivo. Bioessays 29 (4):356-370.score: 20.0
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  27. Richard D. Cummings & David F. Smith (1992). The Selectin Family of Carbohydrate-Binding Proteins: Structure and Importance of Carbohydrate Ligands for Cell Adhesion. Bioessays 14 (12):849-856.score: 20.0
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  28. Gall David (2012). Control of Neuronal Excitability by Calcium Binding Proteins : A New Mathematical Model for Striatal Fast-Spiking Interneurons. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 20.0
  29. Mitsunori Fukuda & Katsuhiko Mikoshiba (1997). The Function of Inositol High Polyphosphate Binding Proteins. Bioessays 19 (7):593-603.score: 20.0
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  30. David Hughes & Peter Fantes (1987). Genetics of Calcium‐Binding Proteins in Yeasts. Bioessays 6 (5):229-231.score: 20.0
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  31. Mitsuhiko Ikura, Masanori Osawa & James B. Ames (2002). The Role of Calcium-Binding Proteins in the Control of Transcription: Structure to Function. Bioessays 24 (7):625-636.score: 20.0
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  32. Alan M. Jones & Paruchuri V. Prasad (1992). Auxin-Binding Proteins and Their Possible Roles in Auxin-Mediated Plant Cell Growth. Bioessays 14 (1):43-48.score: 20.0
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  33. Michael Joulie, Benoit Miotto & Pierre‐Antoine Defossez (2010). Mammalian Methyl‐Binding Proteins: What Might They Do? Bioessays 32 (12):1025-1032.score: 20.0
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  34. David Landsman & Michael Bustin (1993). A Signature for the HMG‐1 Box DNA‐Binding Proteins. Bioessays 15 (8):539-546.score: 20.0
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  35. Jing‐Jer Lin (1993). What the Papers Say: Telomeric DNA Binding Proteins. Bioessays 15 (8):555-557.score: 20.0
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  36. Arthur M. Mercurio & Leslie M. Shaw (1991). Laminin Binding Proteins. Bioessays 13 (9):469-473.score: 20.0
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  37. Raymond J. Owens & Michael J. Crumpton (1984). A New Class of Membrane‐Associated Calcium‐Binding Proteins. Bioessays 1 (2):61-63.score: 20.0
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  38. Krzysztof Palczewski, Arthur S. Polans, Wolfgang Baehr & James B. Ames (2000). Ca2+‐Binding Proteins in the Retina: Structure, Function, and the Etiology of Human Visual Diseases. Bioessays 22 (4):337-350.score: 20.0
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  39. John Sommerville (1992). What the Papers Say: RNA‐Binding Proteins: Masking Proteins Revealed. Bioessays 14 (5):337-339.score: 20.0
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  40. Spiros A. Vlahopoulos, Stella Logotheti, Dimitris Mikas, Athina Giarika, Vassilis Gorgoulis & Vassilis Zoumpourlis (2008). The Role of ATF‐2 in Oncogenesis. Bioessays 30 (4):314-327.score: 20.0
    Activating Transcription Factor-2 is a sequence-specific DNA-binding protein that belongs to the bZIP family of proteins and plays diverse roles in the mammalian cells. In response to stress stimuli, it activates a variety of gene targets including cyclin A, cyclin D and c-jun, which are involved in oncogenesis in various tissue types. ATF-2 expression has been correlated with maintenance of a cancer cell phenotype. However, other studies demonstrate an antiproliferative or apoptotic role for ATF-2. In this review, we summarize (...)
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  41. Paul A. Wade (2001). Methyl CpG‐Binding Proteins and Transcriptional Repression. Bioessays 23 (12):1131-1137.score: 20.0
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  42. Alan P. Wolffe (1994). Structural and Functional Properties of the Evolutionarily Ancient Y‐Box Family of Nucleic Acid Binding Proteins. Bioessays 16 (4):245-251.score: 20.0
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  43. L. Shastri & V. Ajjanagadde (1993). From Simple Associations to Systematic Reasoning: A Connectionist Representation of Rules, Variables, and Dynamic Binding Using Temporal Synchrony. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (3):417-51.score: 19.0
    Human agents draw a variety of inferences effortlessly, spontaneously, and with remarkable efficiency – as though these inferences were a reflexive response of their cognitive apparatus. Furthermore, these inferences are drawn with reference to a large body of background knowledge. This remarkable human ability seems paradoxical given the complexity of reasoning reported by researchers in artificial intelligence. It also poses a challenge for cognitive science and computational neuroscience: How can a system of simple and slow neuronlike elements represent a large (...)
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  44. Christopher J. G. Meacham (2010). Binding and its Consequences. Philosophical Studies 149 (1):49-71.score: 18.0
    In “Bayesianism, Infinite Decisions, and Binding”, Arntzenius et al. (Mind 113:251–283, 2004 ) present cases in which agents who cannot bind themselves are driven by standard decision theory to choose sequences of actions with disastrous consequences. They defend standard decision theory by arguing that if a decision rule leads agents to disaster only when they cannot bind themselves, this should not be taken to be a mark against the decision rule. I show that this claim has surprising implications for a (...)
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  45. Eric LaRock (2007). Disambiguation, Binding, and the Unity of Visual Consciousness. Theory and Psychology 17 (6):747-77.score: 18.0
    Recent findings in neuroscience strongly suggest that an object’s features (e.g., its color, texture, shape, etc.) are represented in separate areas of the visual cortex. Although represented in separate neuronal areas, somehow the feature representations are brought together as a single, unified object of visual consciousness. This raises a question of binding: how do neural activities in separate areas of the visual cortex function to produce a feature-unified object of visual consciousness? Several prominent neuroscientists have adopted neural synchrony and attention-based (...)
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  46. Eric Scerri (2012). What is an Element? What is the Periodic Table? And What Does Quantum Mechanics Contribute to the Question? Foundations of Chemistry 14 (1):69-81.score: 18.0
    This article considers two important traditions concerning the chemical elements. The first is the meaning of the term “element” including the distinctions between element as basic substance, as simple substance and as combined simple substance. In addition to briefly tracing the historical development of these distinctions, I make comments on the recent attempts to clarify the fundamental notion of element as basic substance for which I believe the term “element” is best reserved. This discussion has focused on the writings of (...)
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  47. Volkert Beekman (2000). You Are What You Eat: Meat, Novel Protein Foods, and Consumptive Freedom. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 12 (2):185-196.score: 18.0
    Animal husbandry has been accused ofmaltreating animals, polluting the environment, and soon. These accusations were thought to be answered whenthe Dutch research program ``Sustainable TechnologicalDevelopment'' (STD) suggested a government-initiatedconversion from meat to novel protein foods (NPFs).STD reasoned that if consumers converted from meat toNPFs, non-sustainable animal husbandry would no longerbe needed. Whereas STD only worried about how toconstruct NPFs with a meat bite, this paper drawsattention to the presumed, but problematic, role forthe government in the execution of the STDsuggestions. (...)
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  48. Jonathan Cohen & Samuel C. Rickless (2007). Binding Arguments and Hidden Variables. Analysis 67 (1):65–71.score: 18.0
    o (2000), 243). In particular, the idea is that binding interactions between the relevant expressions and natural lan- guage quantifiers are best explained by the hypothesis that those expressions harbor hidden but bindable variables. Recently, however, Herman Cappelen and Ernie Lepore have rejected such binding arguments for the presence of hid- den variables on the grounds that they overgeneralize — that, if sound, such arguments would establish the presence of hidden variables in all sorts of ex- pressions where it is (...)
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  49. Peter Pagin & Dag Westerståhl (1993). Predicate Logic with Flexibly Binding Operators and Natural Language Semantics. Journal of Logic, Language and Information 2 (2):89-128.score: 18.0
    A new formalism for predicate logic is introduced, with a non-standard method of binding variables, which allows a compositional formalization of certain anaphoric constructions, including donkey sentences and cross-sentential anaphora. A proof system in natural deduction format is provided, and the formalism is compared with other accounts of this type of anaphora, in particular Dynamic Predicate Logic.
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  50. Alan Levin (2010). A Top-Down Approach to a Complex Natural System: Protein Folding. [REVIEW] Axiomathes 20 (4):423-437.score: 18.0
    We develop a general method for applying functional models to natural systems and cite recent progress in protein modeling that demonstrates the power of this approach. Functional modeling constrains the range of acceptable structural models of a system, reduces the difficulty of finding them, and improves their fidelity. However, functional models are distinctly different from the structural models that are more commonly applied in science. In particular, structural and functional models ask different questions and provide different kinds of answers. (...)
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