Search results for 'Fictionality' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Peter Alward, Speech Acts and Fictionality.score: 12.0
    A common approach to drawing boundary between fiction and non-fiction is by appeal to the kinds of speech acts performed by authors of works of the respective categories. Searle, for example, takes fiction to be the product of illocutionary pretense of various kinds on the part of authors and non-fiction to be the product of genuine illocutionary action.1 Currie, in contrast, takes fiction to be the product of sui generis fictional illocutionary action on the part of authors and non-fiction to (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Matthieu Fontaine & Shahid Rahman (2010). Fiction, Creation and Fictionality : An Overview. Methodos 10.score: 12.0
    La réflexion philosophique sur la non-existence est une thématique qui a été abordée au commencement même de la philosophie et qui suscite, depuis la publication en 1905 de « On Denoting » par Russell, les plus vifs débats en philosophie analytique. Cependant, le débat féroce sur la sémantique des noms propres et des descriptions définies qui surgirent suite à la publication du « On Referring » par Strawson en 1950 n’engagea pas d’étude systématique de la sémantique des fictions. En fait, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Eva Kushner (1996). The Renaissance Dialogue and Its Zero-Degree Fictionality. In Calin Andrei Mihailescu & Walid Hamarneh (eds.), Fiction Updated: Theories of Fictionality, Narratology, and Poetics. University of Toronto Press. 165--72.score: 12.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Calin Andrei Mihailescu & Walid Hamarneh (eds.) (1996). Fiction Updated: Theories of Fictionality, Narratology, and Poetics. University of Toronto Press.score: 11.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. David Lewis (1978). Truth in Fiction. American Philosophical Quarterly 15 (1):37--46.score: 10.0
    It is advisable to treat some sorts of discourse about fiction with the aid of an intensional operator "in such-And-Such fiction...." the operator may appear either explicitly or tacitly. It may be analyzed in terms of similarity of worlds, As follows: "in the fiction f, A" means that a is true in those of the worlds where f is told as known fact rather than fiction that differ least from our world, Or from the belief worlds of the community in (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Cain Samuel Todd (2009). Imaginability, Morality, and Fictional Truth: Dissolving the Puzzle of 'Imaginative Resistance'. Philosophical Studies 143 (2):187-211.score: 10.0
    This paper argues that there is no genuine puzzle of ‘imaginative resistance’. In part 1 of the paper I argue that the imaginability of fictional propositions is relative to a range of different factors including the ‘thickness’ of certain concepts, and certain pre-theoretical and theoretical commitments. I suggest that those holding realist moral commitments may be more susceptible to resistance and inability than those holding non-realist commitments, and that it is such realist commitments that ultimately motivate the problem. However, I (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Brian Weatherson (2004). Morality, Fiction, and Possibility. Philosophers' Imprint 4 (3):1-27.score: 10.0
    Authors have a lot of leeway with regard to what they can make true in their story. In general, if the author says that p is true in the fiction we’re reading, we believe that p is true in that fiction. And if we’re playing along with the fictional game, we imagine that, along with everything else in the story, p is true. But there are exceptions to these general principles. Many authors, most notably Kendall Walton and Tamar Szabó Gendler, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Allan Hazlett & Christy Mag Uidhir (2011). Unrealistic Fictions. American Philosophical Quarterly 48 (1):33--46.score: 10.0
    In this paper, we develop an analysis of unrealistic fiction that captures the everyday sense of ‘unrealistic’. On our view, unrealistic fictions are a species of inconsistent fictions, but fictions for which such inconsistency, given the supporting role we claim played by genre, needn’t be a critical defect. We first consider and reject an analysis of unrealistic fiction as fiction that depicts or describes unlikely events; we then develop our own account and make an initial statement of it: unrealistic fictions (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Gregory Currie (1990). The Nature of Fiction. Cambridge University Press.score: 10.0
    This important new book provides a theory about the nature of fiction, and about the relation between the author, the reader, and the fictional text.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Mikhail G. Katz & David Sherry (2013). Leibniz's Infinitesimals: Their Fictionality, Their Modern Implementations, and Their Foes From Berkeley to Russell and Beyond. [REVIEW] Erkenntnis 78 (3):571-625.score: 10.0
    Many historians of the calculus deny significant continuity between infinitesimal calculus of the seventeenth century and twentieth century developments such as Robinson’s theory. Robinson’s hyperreals, while providing a consistent theory of infinitesimals, require the resources of modern logic; thus many commentators are comfortable denying a historical continuity. A notable exception is Robinson himself, whose identification with the Leibnizian tradition inspired Lakatos, Laugwitz, and others to consider the history of the infinitesimal in a more favorable light. Inspite of his Leibnizian sympathies, (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. K. Ludwig Pfeiffer (1990). Zum Systematischen Stand der FiktionstheorieReflections on the Systematic State of the Theory of Fiction. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 21 (1):135-156.score: 10.0
    The theory of fiction is systematically locatedbetween different types of discourse, of which philosophy, literary criticism and psychology/psychoanalysis are perhaps the most important. Mythesis is thatempiricist, mainly British philosophical approaches provide fascinatinghistorical models for an analysis of the situation in which we seem caught today between tendencies towards panfictionalization (since Vaihinger) and towards fairly rigid distinctions between fiction and reality. In my perspective, empiricist philosophy is not so much concerned with what isgiven, but with thecontrol of distinctions between the real (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Derek Matravers (2003). Fictional Assent and the (so-Called) `Puzzle of Imaginative Resistance'. In Matthew Kieran & Dominic McIver Lopes (eds.), Imagination, Philosophy, and the Arts. Routledge. 91-106.score: 9.0
    This article criticises existing solutions to the 'puzzle of imaginative resistance', reconstrues it, and offers a solution of its own. About the Book : Imagination, Philosophy and the Arts is the first comprehensive collection of papers by philosophers examining the nature of imagination and its role in understanding and making art. Imagination is a central concept in aesthetics with close ties to issues in the philosophy of mind and the philosophy of language, yet it has not received the kind of (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. John Dilworth (2002). The Fictionality of Plays. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 60 (3):263–273.score: 9.0
  14. Stacie Friend (2008). Imagining Fact and Fiction. In Kathleen Stock & Katherine Thomsen-Jones (eds.), New Waves in Aesthetics. Palgrave Macmillan. 150-169.score: 9.0
  15. Kendall L. Walton (1983). Fiction, Fiction-Making, and Styles of Fictionality. Philosophy and Literature 7 (1):78-88.score: 9.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Peter Alward (2010). Word-Sculpture, Speech Acts, and Fictionality. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 68 (4):389-399.score: 9.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. R. Haller (1989). Incompleteness and Fictionality in Meinong's Object Theory. Topoi 8 (1):63-70.score: 9.0
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. David Lewis (1983). Postscript to Truth in Fiction. In Philosophical Papers. Oxford University Press. 276-280.score: 9.0
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Sol Cohen (2004). An Essay In The Aid Of Writing History: Fictions Of Historiography. Studies in Philosophy and Education 23 (5-6):317-332.score: 9.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Zoltán Kanyó (ed.) (1984). Fictionality. Jate Sokszorosit Ó Üzemében.score: 9.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. John Woods (1969). Fictionality and the Logic of Relations. Southern Journal of Philosophy 7 (1):51-63.score: 9.0
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Peter Lamarque (1994). Truth, Fiction, and Literature: A Philosophical Perspective. Oxford University Press.score: 8.0
    This book examines the complex and varied ways in which fictions relate to the real world, and offers a precise account of how imaginative works of literature can use fictional content to explore matters of universal human interest. While rejecting the traditional view that literature is important for the truths that it imparts, the authors also reject attempts to cut literature off altogether from real human concerns. Their detailed account of fictionality, mimesis, and cognitive value, founded on the methods (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. K. Ludwig Pfeiffer (1990). Zum Systematischen Stand der Fiktionstheorie. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 21 (1):135 - 156.score: 7.0
    Reflections on the Systematic State of the Theory of Fiction. The theory of fiction is systematically located between different types of discourse, of which philosophy, literary criticism and psychology/psychoanalysis are perhaps the most important. My thesis is that empiricist, mainly British philosophical approaches provide fascinating historical models for an analysis of the situation in which we seem caught today between tendencies towards panfictionalization (since Vaihinger) and towards fairly rigid distinctions between fiction and reality. In my perspective, empiricist philosophy is not (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Franck Lihoreau (ed.) (2011). Truth in Fiction. Ontos Verlag.score: 6.0
    The essays collected in this volume are all concerned with the connection between fiction and truth. This question is of utmost importance to metaphysics, philosophy of language, philosophical logic and epistemology, raising in each of these areas and at their intersections a large number of issues related to creation, existence, reference, identity, modality, belief, assertion, imagination, pretense, etc. All these topics and many more are addressed in this collection, which brings together original essays written from various points of view by (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Stacie Friend (2007). Fictional Characters. Philosophy Compass 2 (2):141–156.score: 6.0
    If there are no fictional characters, how do we explain thought and discourse apparently about them? If there are, what are they like? A growing number of philosophers claim that fictional characters are abstract objects akin to novels or plots. They argue that postulating characters provides the most straightforward explanation of our literary practices as well as a uniform account of discourse and thought about fiction. Anti-realists counter that postulation is neither necessary nor straightforward, and that the invocation of pretense (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Stavroula Glezakos (forthcoming). Truth and Reference in Fiction. In Gillian Russell & Delia Graff Fara (eds.), Routledge Companion to the Philosophy of Language. Routledge.score: 6.0
    Fiction is often characterized by way of a contrast with truth, as, for example, in the familiar couplet “Truth is always strange/ Stranger than fiction" (Byron 1824). And yet, those who would maintain that “we will always learn more about human life and human personality from novels than from scientific psychology” (Chomsky 1988: 159) hold that some truth is best encountered via fiction. The scrupulous novelist points out that her work depicts no actual person, either living or dead; nonetheless, we (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Stuart Brock (2007). Fictions, Feelings, and Emotions. Philosophical Studies 132 (2):211 - 242.score: 6.0
    Many philosophers suggest (1) that our emotional engagement with fiction involves participation in a game of make-believe, and (2) that what distinguishes an emotional game from a dispassionate game is the fact that the former activity alone involves sensations of physiological and visceral disturbances caused by our participation in the game. In this paper I argue that philosophers who accept (1) should reject (2). I then illustrate how this conclusion illuminates various puzzles in aesthetics and the philosophy of mind.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Shen-yi Liao & Sara Protasi (2013). The Fictional Character of Pornography. In Hans Maes (ed.), Pornographic Art and the Aesthetics of Pornography. Palgrave Macmillan. 100-118.score: 6.0
    We refine a line of feminist criticism of pornography that focuses on pornographic works' pernicious effects. A.W. Eaton argues that inegalitarian pornography should be criticized because it is responsible for its consumers’ adoption of inegalitarian attitudes toward sex in the same way that other fictions are responsible for changes in their consumers’ attitudes. We argue that her argument can be improved with the recognition that different fictions can have different modes of persuasion. This is true of film and television: a (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Francesco Berto (2011). Modal Meinongianism and Fiction: The Best of Three Worlds. Philosophical Studies 152 (3):313-35.score: 6.0
    We outline a neo-Meinongian framework labeled as Modal Meinongian Metaphysics (MMM) to account for the ontology and semantics of fictional discourse. Several competing accounts of fictional objects are originated by the fact that our talking of them mirrors incoherent intuitions: mainstream theories of fiction privilege some such intuitions, but are forced to account for others via complicated paraphrases of the relevant sentences. An ideal theory should resort to as few paraphrases as possible. In Sect. 1, we make this explicit via (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Gabriele Contessa (2010). Scientific Models and Fictional Objects. Synthese 172 (2):215 - 229.score: 6.0
    In this paper, I distinguish scientific models in three kinds on the basis of their ontological status—material models, mathematical models and fictional models, and develop and defend an account of fictional models as fictional objects—i.e. abstract objects that stand for possible concrete objects.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Heidi Tiedke (2011). Proper Names and Their Fictional Uses. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 89 (4):707 - 726.score: 6.0
    Fictional names present unique challenges for semantic theories of proper names, challenges strong enough to warrant an account of names different from the standard treatment. The theory developed in this paper is motivated by a puzzle that depends on four assumptions: our intuitive assessment of the truth values of certain sentences, the most straightforward treatment of their syntactic structure, semantic compositionality, and metaphysical scruples strong enough to rule out fictional entities, at least. It is shown that these four assumptions, taken (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Christy Mag Uidhir & Henry Pratt (2013). Pornography at the Edge: Depiction, Fiction, & Sexual Predilection. In Hans Maes & Jerrold Levinson (eds.), Art & Pornography: Philosophical Essays. Oxford University Press.score: 6.0
    The primary purpose of depictive works of pornography, we take it, is sexual arousal through sexually explicit representations; what we callprototypical pornography satisfies those aims through the adoption of a ceteris paribus maximally realistic depictive style. Given that the purpose of sexual arousal seems best fulfilled by establishing the most robust connections between the viewer and the depictive subject, we find it curious that not all works of pornography aspire to prototypical status. Accordingly, we target for philosophical scrutiny several non-standard (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Shen-yi Liao (2013). Moral Persuasion and the Diversity of Fictions. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 94 (3):269-289.score: 6.0
    Narrative representations can change our moral actions and thoughts, for better or for worse. In this article, I develop a theory of fictions' capacity for moral education and moral corruption that is fully sensitive to the diversity of fictions. Specifically, I argue that the way a fiction influences our moral actions and thoughts importantly depends on its genre. This theory promises new insights into practical ethical debates over pornography and media violence.
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Amie L. Thomasson (1999). Fiction and Metaphysics. Cambridge University Press.score: 6.0
    This challenging study places fiction squarely at the center of the discussion of metaphysics. Philosophers have traditionally treated fiction as involving a set of narrow problems in logic or the philosophy of language. By contrast Amie Thomasson argues that fiction has far-reaching implications for central problems of metaphysics. The book develops an 'artifactual' theory of fiction, whereby fictional characters are abstract artifacts as ordinary as laws or symphonies or works of literature. By understanding fictional characters we come to understand how (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Daniéle Moyal-Sharrock (2009). The Fiction of Paradox: Really Feeling for Anna Karenina. In Ylva Gustafsson, Camilla Kronqvist & Michael McEachrane (eds.), Emotions and Understanding: Wittgensteinian Perspectives. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 6.0
    How is it that we can be moved by what we know does not exist? In this paper, I examine the so-called 'paradox of fiction', showing that it fatally hinges on cognitive theories of emotion such as Kendall Walton's pretend theory and Peter Lamarque's thought theory. I reject these theories and acknowledge the concept-formative role of genuine emotion generated by fiction. I then argue, contra Jenefer Robinson, that this 'éducation sentimentale' is not achieved through distancing, but rather through the engagement (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Peter Alward (2009). That's the Fictional Truth, Ruth. Acta Analytica 25 (3):347-363.score: 6.0
    Fictional truth is commonly analyzed in terms of the speech acts or propositional attitudes of a teller. In this paper, I investigate Lewis’s counterfactual analysis in terms of felicitous narrator assertion, Currie’s analysis in terms of fictional author belief, and Byrne’s analysis in terms of ideal author invitations to make-believe—and find them all lacking. I propose instead an analysis in terms of the revelations of an infelicitous narrator.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Stefano Predelli (2008). Modal Monsters and Talk About Fiction. Journal of Philosophical Logic 37 (3):277-297.score: 6.0
    This paper argues in favor of a treatment of discourse about fiction in terms of operators on character, that is, Kaplanesque ‘monsters’. The first three sections criticize the traditional analysis of ‘according to the fiction’ as an intensional operator, and the approach to fictional discourse grounded on the notion of contextual shifts. The final sections explain how an analysis in terms of monsters yields the correct readings for a variety of examples involving modal and temporal indexicals.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Francesco Berto (2008). Modal Meinongianism for Fictional Objects. Metaphysica 9 (2):205-218.score: 6.0
    Drawing on different suggestions from the literature, we outline a unified metaphysical framework, labeled as Modal Meinongian Metaphysics (MMM), combining Meinongian themes with a non-standard modal ontology. The MMM approach is based on (1) a comprehension principle (CP) for objects in unrestricted, but qualified form, and (2) the employment of an ontology of impossible worlds, besides possible ones. In §§1–2, we introduce the classical Meinongian metaphysics and consider two famous Russellian criticisms, namely (a) the charge of inconsistency and (b) the (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Rocco J. Gennaro (2000). Fiction, Pleasurable Tragedy, and the HOT Theory of Consciousness. Philosophical Papers 29 (2):107-20.score: 6.0
    [Final version in Philosophical Papers, 2000] Much has been made over the past few decades of two related problems in aesthetics. First, the "feeling fiction problem," as I will call it, asks: is it rational to be moved by what happens to fictional characters? How can we care about what happens to people who we know are not real?[i] Second, the so-called "paradox of tragedy" is embodied in the question: Why or how is it that we take pleasure in artworks (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Franklin G. Miller, Robert D. Truog & Dan W. Brock (2010). Moral Fictions and Medical Ethics. Bioethics 24 (9):453-460.score: 6.0
    Conventional medical ethics and the law draw a bright line distinguishing the permitted practice of withdrawing life-sustaining treatment from the forbidden practice of active euthanasia by means of a lethal injection. When clinicians justifiably withdraw life-sustaining treatment, they allow patients to die but do not cause, intend, or have moral responsibility for, the patient's death. In contrast, physicians unjustifiably kill patients whenever they intentionally administer a lethal dose of medication. We argue that the differential moral assessment of these two practices (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Andrea Sauchelli (2012). Fictional Objects, Non-Existence, and the Principle of Characterization. Philosophical Studies 159 (1):139-146.score: 6.0
    I advance an objection to Graham Priest’s account of fictional entities as nonexistent objects. According to Priest, fictional characters do not have, in our world, the properties they are represented as having; for example, the property of being a bank clerk is possessed by Joseph K. not in our world but in other worlds. Priest claims that, in this way, his theory can include an unrestricted principle of characterization for objects. Now, some representational properties attributed to fictional characters, a kind (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. David Carr (1998). Phenomenology and Fiction in Dennett. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 6 (3):331-344.score: 6.0
    In Consciousness Explained and other works, Daniel Dennett uses the concept of phenomenology (along with his variant, called heterophenomenology) in almost complete disregard of the work of Husserl and his successors in German and French philosophy. Yet it can be argued that many of the most important ideas of Husserl, Merleau-Ponty and others (and not just the idea of intentionality) reappear in Dennett's work in only slightly altered form. In this article I try to show this in two ways, first (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Roman Frigg (2010). Models and Fiction. Synthese 172 (2):251 - 268.score: 6.0
    Most scientific models are not physical objects, and this raises important questions. What sort of entity are models, what is truth in a model, and how do we learn about models? In this paper I argue that models share important aspects in common with literary fiction, and that therefore theories of fiction can be brought to bear on these questions. In particular, I argue that the pretence theory as developed by Walton (1990, Mimesis as make-believe: on the foundations of (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Peter Godfrey-Smith (2009). Models and Fictions in Science. Philosophical Studies 143 (1):101 - 116.score: 6.0
    Non-actual model systems discussed in scientific theories are compared to fictions in literature. This comparison may help with the understanding of similarity relations between models and real-world target systems. The ontological problems surrounding fictions in science may be particularly difficult, however. A comparison is also made to ontological problems that arise in the philosophy of mathematics.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Paisley Livingston & Andrea Sauchelli (2011). Philosophical Perspectives on Fictional Characters. New Literary History 42 (2):337-360.score: 6.0
    This paper takes up a series of basic philosophical questions about the nature and existence of fictional characters. We begin with realist approaches that hinge on the thesis that at least some claims about fictional characters can be right or wrong because they refer to something that exists, such as abstract objects. Irrealist approaches deny such realist postulations and hold instead that fictional characters are a figment of the human imagination. A third family of approaches, based on work by Alexius (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. John Zeimbekis (2004). Propositional Attitudes in Fiction. British Journal of Aesthetics 44 (3):261-276.score: 6.0
    Theories that seek to explain the status of psychological states experienced in fictional contexts either claim that those states are special propositional attitudes specific to fictional contexts (make-believe attitudes), or else define them as normal propositional attitudes by stretching the concept of a propositional attitude to include ‘objectless’ states that do not imply constraints such as truth or satisfaction. I argue that the first theory is either vacuous or false, and that the second, by defining the reality of the states (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Jukka Mikkonen (2009). Intentions and Interpretations: Philosophical Fiction as Conversation. Contemporary Aesthetics 7.score: 6.0
    Appeals to the actual author's intention in order to legitimate an interpretation of a work of literary narrative fiction have generally been considered extraneous in Anglo-American philosophy of literature since Wimsatt and Beardsley's well-known manifesto from the 1940s. For over sixty years now so-called anti-intentionalists have argued that the author's intentions – plans, aims, and purposes considering her work – are highly irrelevant to interpretation. In this paper, I shall argue that the relevance of the actual author's intentions varies in (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Daniel D. Hutto (2011). Understanding Fictional Minds Without Theory of Mind! Style 45 (2):276-282.score: 6.0
    This paper explores the idea that when dealing with certain kinds of narratives, ‘like it or not’, consumers of fiction will bring the same sorts of skills (or at least a subset of them) to bear that they use when dealing with actual minds. Let us call this the ‘Same Resources Thesis’. I believe the ‘Same Resources Thesis’ is true. But this is because I defend the view that engaging in narrative practices is the normal developmental route through which children (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Anna Bjurman Pautz (2008). Fictional Coreference as a Problem for the Pretense Theory. Philosophical Studies 141 (2):147 - 156.score: 6.0
    There seems to be a perfectly ordinary sense in which different speakers can use an empty name to talk about the same thing. Call this fictional coreference. It is a constraint on an adequate theory of empty names that it provide a satisfactory account of fictional coreference. The main claim of this paper is that the pretense theory of empty names does not respect this constraint.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Andrew Kania (2007). Worlds Are Colliding! Explaining the Fictional in Terms of the Real. Philosophical Studies 135 (1):65 - 71.score: 6.0
    I discuss Gregory Currie’s taxonomy of explanations of the fictional. On the one hand, there is an important kind of relation between internal and external explanations of some fictional truths that Currie leaves out, where both are salient and yet in a relation of harmony with each other. On the other hand, I do not see that he has established that there is a genuine relation of tension between some pairs of internal and external explanations, and thus I question the (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000