Search results for 'Foreword by Stephen P. Marks' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Stephen P. Marks (forthcoming). Human Rights and the Challenges of Science and Technology. Science and Engineering Ethics:1-7.score: 1248.0
    The expansion of the corpus of international human rights to include the right to water and sanitation has implications both for the process of recognizing human rights and for future developments in the relationships between technology, engineering and human rights. Concerns with threats to human rights resulting from developments in science and technology were expressed in the early days of the United Nations (UN), along with the recognition of the ambitious human right of everyone “to enjoy the benefits of scientific (...)
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  2. Stephen P. Marks (2001). Jonathan Mann's Legacy to the 21st Century: The Human Rights Imperative for Public Health. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 29 (1):131-138.score: 846.0
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  3. Stephen P. Marks (2002). The Evolving Field of Health and Human Rights: Issues and Methods. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 30 (4):739-754.score: 846.0
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  4. Mélanie E. de Wit, Clifford M. Marks, Jeffrey P. Natterman & Albert W. Wu (2013). Supporting Second Victims of Patient Safety Events: Shouldn't These Communications Be Covered by Legal Privilege? Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (4):852-858.score: 720.0
    Adverse events that harm patients can also have a harmful impact on health care workers. A few health care organizations have begun to provide psychological support to these Second Victims, but there is uncertainty over whether these discussions are admissible as evidence in malpractice litigation or disciplinary proceedings. We examined the laws governing the admissibility of these communications in 5 states, and address how the laws might affect participation in programs designed to support health care workers involved in adverse events. (...)
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  5. —Sakiko Fukuda-Parr (2008). Development as a Human Right: Legal, Political, and Economic Dimensions - Edited by Bård A. Andreassen and Stephen P. Marks. Ethics and International Affairs 22 (1):124–126.score: 597.6
  6. Margot E. Salomon & Foreword by Stephen P. Marks (2007). Global Responsibility for Human Rights: World Poverty and the Development of International Law. OUP Oxford.score: 395.0
    World poverty represents a failure of the international community to see half of the global population secure their basic socio-economic rights. Yet international law establishes that cooperation is essential to the realisation of these human rights. In an era of considerable interdependence and marked economic and political advantage, the particular features of contemporary world poverty give rise to pressing questions about the scope, evolution, and application of the international law of human rights, and the attribution of global responsibility. -/- This (...)
     
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  7. Joel Marks (ed.) (1986). The Ways of Desire: New Essays in Philosophical Psychology on the Concept of Wanting. Transaction Publishers.score: 300.0
    Collection of original essays on the theory of desire by Robert Audi, Annette Baier, Wayne Davis, Ronald de Sousa, Robert Gordon, O.H. Green, Joel Marks, Dennis Stampe, Mitchell Staude, Michael Stocker, and C.C.W. Taylor.
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  8. Jonathan Marks (2005). Perfection and Disharmony in the Thought of Jean-Jacques Rousseau. Cambridge University Press.score: 300.0
    In Perfection and Disharmony in the Thought of Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Jonathan Marks offers a new interpretation of the philosopher's thought and its place in the contemporary debate between liberals and communitarians. Against prevailing views, he argues that Rousseau's thought revolves around the natural perfection of a naturally disharmonious being. At the foundation of Rousseau's thought he finds a natural teleology that takes account of and seeks to harmonize conflicting ends. The Rousseau who emerges from this interpretation is a radical (...)
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  9. Joel Marks (2007). A Planet by Any Other Name: An Exercise in Astro-Metaphysics. Think 5 (14):103-106.score: 300.0
    Joel Marks discusses the philosophical aspects of a question recently in the news: is Pluto a planet, or not?
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  10. Jeffrey A. Marks (1987). Tv News Photographer as Equipment: A Response. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 2 (2):18 – 20.score: 300.0
    In response to the preceding research report by Professor Steele, television news director Jeffrey Marks suggests that TV news photographers operate in a world not entirely of their own making. They are often treated as pieces of equipment whose insights and judgments are not taken into consideration when newscasts are produced. Seeing the world through a two?inch black and white viewfinder causes some distorted perceptions of reality and a certain detachment from ethical decision making. The author, chairman of the (...)
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  11. Sharona Hoffman (2007). Review of Sofia Gruskin, Michael A. Grodin, George J. Annas, and Stephen P. Marks (Eds.), Perspectives on Health and Human Rights. Oxford, UK: Routledge, 2005. 672 Pp. $36.95, Paperback. [REVIEW] American Journal of Bioethics 7 (4):90-91.score: 259.2
  12. Sakiko Fukuda-Parr (2008). Development as a Human Right: Legal, Political, and Economic Dimensions, Bård A. Andreassen and Stephen P. Marks, Eds.(Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard School of Public Health, 2007), 350 Pp., $24.95 Paper. [REVIEW] Ethics and International Affairs 22 (1):124-126.score: 259.2
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  13. Lawrence O. Gostin (2001). A Vision of Health and Human Rights for the 21st Century: A Continuing Discussion with Stephen P. Marks. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 29 (2):139-140.score: 259.2
  14. Arthur S. Marks (1967). An Anatomical Drawing by Alexander Cozens. Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 30:434-438.score: 240.0
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  15. Joel H. Marks (1999). Stories for and by Students. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 6 (2):5-8.score: 160.0
    In the beginning I was the typical academic philosophy professor and teacher, whose stock in trade was argumentative essays about abstract issues. It puzzled, or bemused, even distressed me, therefore, when I would sometimes hear my students refer to the assigned readings in my courses as "stories." I attributed this inappropriate nomenclature to their inexperience with anything other than fiction and literature prior to their first philosophy course. But the shoe is now on the other foot. I myself have become (...)
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  16. Anne Victoria Neale, Justin Northrup, Rhonda Dailey, Ellen Marks & Judith Abrams (2007). Correction and Use of Biomedical Literature Affected by Scientific Misconduct. Science and Engineering Ethics 13 (1):5-24.score: 160.0
    The purpose of this study was to identify and describe published research articles that were named in official findings of scientific misconduct and to investigate compliance with the administrative actions contained in these reports for corrections and retractions, as represented in PubMed. Between 1993 and 2001, 102 articles were named in either the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts (“Findings of Scientific Misconduct”) or the U.S. Office of Research Integrity annual reports as needing retraction or correction. In 2002, 98 of (...)
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  17. John W. Donahoe & David P. Marks (1982). 12-Year Retention of Stimulus and Schedule Control. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 19 (3):184-186.score: 160.0
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  18. Joel Marks (2008). Capers in the Churchyard: Animal Rights Advocacy in the Age of Terror, by Lee Hall. Philosophy Now 67:43-45.score: 160.0
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  19. P. J. Hampson, D. F. Marks & Janet Richardson (eds.) (1990). Imagery: Current Developments. Routledge.score: 160.0
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  20. J. Marks (2008). Book Review: Genetic Governance: Health, Risk and Ethics in the Biotech Era Edited by Robin Bunton and Alan Petersen London: Routledge, 2005. [REVIEW] Theory, Culture and Society 25 (2):157-160.score: 160.0
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  21. Andrew Marks (2000). Lifelong Learning and the 'Breadwinner Ideology': Addressing the Problems of Lack of Participation by Adult, Working-Class Males in Higher Education on Merseyside. Educational Studies 26 (3):303-319.score: 160.0
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  22. John McArthur & Stephen V. Marks (1988). Constituent Interest Vs. Legislator Ideology: The Role of Political Opportunity Cost, 26 Econ. Inquiry 461.score: 160.0
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  23. Sarah McGrath (2004). Moral Knowledge by Perception. Philosophical Perspectives 18 (1):209–228.score: 108.0
    On the face of it, some of our knowledge is of moral facts (for example, that this promise should not be broken in these circumstances), and some of it is of non-moral facts (for example, that the kettle has just boiled). But, some argue, there is reason to believe that we do not, after all, know any moral facts. For example, according to J. L. Mackie, if we had moral knowledge (‘‘if we were aware of [objective values]’’), ‘‘it would have (...)
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  24. Feliz Molina (2011). A Playful Reading of the Double Quotation in The Descent of Alette by Alice Notley. Continent 1 (4).score: 108.0
    continent. 1.4 (2011): 230—233. A word about the quotation marks. People ask about them, in the beginning; in the process of giving themselves up to reading the poem, they become comfortable with them, without necessarily thinking precisely about why they’re there. But they’re there, mostly to measure the poem. The phrases they enclose are poetic feet. If I had simply left white spaces between the phrases, the phrases would be read too fast for my musical intention. The quotation (...) make the reader slow down and silently articulate—not slur over mentally—the phrases at the pace, and with the stresses, I intend. They also distance the narrative form myself. I am not Alette. Finally they may remind the reader that each phrase is a thing said by a voice: this is not a thought, or a record of thought process, this is a story, told.(1) We read (reread) the poems that keep the discourse with ourselves going. —Wallace Stevens We have to break open words or sentences, too, and find what’s uttered in them. —Gilles Deleuze “The Descent of Alette” “is an allegorical poem” “in four books” “first published” “in 1992” “by Alice Notley.” “In the Descent of Alette,” “the double quotation mark” “is wrapped around” “words, phrases, sometimes whole sentences, and utilized as bones for structure and tonality.” “The winged” “dbl quotation” “like angels or devils” “descending from elsewhere” “function as” “poetic feet.” “Distance” “in the text through the use of dbl quotes,” “according to Notley,” “was a way to distance” “her self” “from the narrative.” I know someone who tattooed double quotes on her shoulder blades. In other words, the body is quotable. To be able to say that one is quotable. A body filled with other’s sayings. I never asked her what for, what is the double quote tattoo for and why on the shoulder blades? I prefer my own interpretation that keeps shifting every time I see her. First words of every poem in every book: Book One One ... On ... A ... There ... I ... We ... An ... A ... A ... I ... At ... A ... When ... When ... There ... I ... In ... At ... I ... Once ... A ... A ... In ... A ... A ... Two ... I ... I ... Eyeball ... In ... I... A ... I ... I ... On ... I ... There ... What ... As ... As Book Two I ... When ... I ... I ... As ... I ... I ... There ... I ... There ... I ... A ... I ... I ... I ... I ... I ... I ... I ... I ... I ... I ... I ... I ... I ... I ... I ... I ... I ... I ... I ... I ... I ... I Book Three The ... Presently ... I ... I’m ... I ... We ... What ... My ... I ... Who ... But ... Lay ... My ... I ... The ... Your ... The ... I ... It’s ... As ... The ... Talon’s ... When ... We ... I ... Slowly ... I ... I ... The ... How ... The Book Four I ... I ... You ... The ... Now ... She ... The ... There ... As ... Then ... The ... All ... Let’s I ... You ... The ... Thus ... The ... I ... The ... I ... There ... Have ... The ... As ... The Defamiliar Object “Poetry is a defamiliarized language, whose formations, so far from being simply formations of meaning, are aesthetic structures...”(2) “The same can be” “irresponsibly associated” “with the use of punctuation.” “The dbl quotation as a measure” “of poetic feet” “is treated as such” “because the author” “injects artfulness into it.” “The dbl quote is an object—” “a joystick” “to control breadth” “(of breath.)” “To de-familiarize” “said sign” “is also to” “impart the sensation of [it] as [it is] perceived and not as they are known.”(3) “The dbl quote” “nests previous words, phrasings and sayings.” “How many have come and gone” “through the doorway of this punctuation sign.” “There are also air quotes and virtual quotes.” “There is emphasis and there’s irony.” “It would be aggravating” “or interesting” “to watch a reading of” “The Descent of Alette” “with someone” “raising and curling” “fingers” “bent out of shape” “in what could be used as” “peace signs.” “I am trying to avoid” “scare quotes.” “I looked up” “what they are” “and supposedly they arose” “in the early 20th century.” “The scare quote” “is a mark around a word or phrase to indicate that it doesn’t signify conventional or literal meaning.” “This isn’t how Notley” “intended to use them” “in The Descent of Alette.” “The characters, places, and things” “signify nothing” “beyond” “their literal meaning” “ within the allegory .” “I’d like to stress” “within the allegory;” “that’s why its” “italicized.” “It is told through” “the main character/voice of” “Alette.” “The author reminds us she is not Alette.” “The author marvelously found a way” “to distance” “her self” “from the narrative.” “This was attempted” “by tonal and intimate” “affect of the dbl quote” “used as poetic feet.” “Its as though” “punctuation in this regard” “becomes a magical toy.” “Arguably, punctuation” “(as perceived)” “undergoes a kind of” “ defamiliar ” “make-over.” “The text” gently forces the reader” “to slow down,” “read slowly.” “At some point” “one begins to sense” “lines of text” “moving on its own.” “Broken words, phrases, and sentences” “shuttling left to right” “like a subway” “that stops” “from station to station;” “open quote to end quote.” Double Quote Occupied “There are two worlds; one above ground” “and one underground.” “The world above ground is where,” “the tyrant” “with a capital t” “lives.” “(The “T” gets tangled in the claws of the dbl quote.)” “Alette becomes an owl and kills him.” “In the last book the tyrant dies.” “ “...the tyrant” “a man in charge of” “the fact” “that we were” “below the ground” “endlessly riding” “our trains, never surfacing” “A man who” “would make you pay” “so much” “to leave the subway” “that you don’t” “ever ask” “how much it is” “It is, in effect,” “all of you & more” “Most of which you already” “pay to live below” “But he would literally” “take your soul” “Which is what you are” “below the ground” “Your soul” “your soul rides” “this subway” “I saw” “on the subway a” “world of souls” ”(4) “New York;” “the city of cities” “and its subways—” “worlds underground,” “above ground,” “& above the above ground.” “Skyscrapers,” “Wall Street,” “old money,” “new money,” “and falling further down a cleavage;” “the middle class” “slipping away.” “Contemporary artist ” “Ligorano Reece” “recently made” “a sculpture of ice ” “a block of ice” “carved to read” “middle class” “(in all upper case letters)” “and let it melt” “naturally” “for however long—” “hours,” “days.” “It didn’t take very long to melt.” A global uprise of mass demonstrations; a cacophony of bodies on the street, in parks and universities, on City Hall lawns, coastal ports, neighborhoods, etc., and for what? The reasons are endless and finite. Not a single body is unaffected by the movement even when not “occupying.” “Occupiers” “stormed into a Sotheby’s auction” “protesting” “via human microphone” “that the CEO takes home” “about” “six thousand dollars” “a day.” “(The a/Art market” “is not a reflection” “of a desire” “for a/Art” “but a reflection” “of a desire” “for money” “confused with a/Art.)” What could it mean to occupy that which has been written or said? Someone with double quotes tattooed on both shoulders attempts to reclaim the sign; re-invent it privately-publicly since the body is always split between both spheres. A genre of hide-and-seek; the speaking and silent body which can never mean what it says even while it so desires to mean something. To nest (and hold hostage) someone in double quotes is an act of violence; a gesture of displacement where one is arrested, dislocated, and scrutinized under a distant gaze. “The air quote” “also known as” “finger quote or ersatz quote” “supposedly” “harks back to” “1927.” “The brevity of this gesture” “ as something invisible” “like virtual money or credit” “doesn’t really exist” “though it take up space;” “its the ghostliest of all punctuation signs” “and one that requires the presence and appearance of a body.” “ “she made a form” “in her mind” “an imaginary” “form” “to settle” “in her arms where” “the baby” “had been” “We saw her fiery arms” “cradle air” “She cradled air...” ”(5) “The air” “gets occupied” “by one or two hands” “with thumb, forefinger, and middle finger” “which alternately could be used” “to shoot rubber bullets,” “pepper spray,” “tear gas.” “How three fingers” “could be responsible for so much:” “satire, sarcasm, irony” “and ultimately” “bruises, blood, death.” (“The violence of the dbl quote is to eagerly to place oneself inside a tornado.)” “The violence of this” “embodied punctuation mark” “stems from a discordance with others.” “Is the name, word, or phrase” “placed in dbl quotes” “heroic” “ or brave?” “An act of displacement;” “must there always be” “bright or negative lights—” “a leaderless act” “to inhabit, to occupy” “space removed” “from normative use.” “Of course” “I’m also wondering” “what it means to re-occupy” “public/private space—the street, neighborhood or page” “policed” “by laws, limits, and” “to some extent” “punctuation.” Echo, Mirror “There are first, second, and third voices interwoven.” “ “Braid of voices,”(6) ” “Some lines read as internal thoughts,” “dialogues,” “and scene descriptions,” “all of which make up the allegory.” “It seems appropriate” “for the word” “allegory” “to nest in dbl quotes” “for perhaps it might be” “a gesture to echo on and on” “eternally referencing” “whatever came before.” I notice the first tooth of the double quote, when paying too close attention, gets caught in the hook of the “f”. I space bar to untangle them; the f does not resist the closed bite of “deaf” and I resist to know what it could mean, because it could doubly mean nothing. “ “He looked” “so familiar” “to me...”(7) ” “The second-person” “echoes in one of two directions:” “further into” “or farther from” “me.” “Its as though” “the second-person amplifies” “or else the opposite” “in which he,” “who looks so familiar,” “retreats further” “like stars in a telescope.” “The dbl quote” “has this kind of affect” “concerning distance and dimension” “as also illusory” “as something twice removed” “and unreal” “in a similar way” “movie stars are unreal and far away.” “ “I entered” “a car” “in which I seemed” “to see double” “Each person I” “looked at seemed” “spread out” “as if doubled” “Gradually” “I perceived that” “each person” “was surrounded by a ghostly” “second image” “was encased in it” “& each” / “of those images,” “those encasings,” “was exactly the same” “each was in fact” “the tyrant...” ”(8) A daydream of a mirror-less world while staring through window blinds; a palm tree behind. It was dark with nothing there. A world with no mirrors “in my mind,” though my mind could only reflect what it knew: a palm tree. Naturally then, palm trees multiplied; a world of palm trees reflected the daydream with no mirror in sight. “The mirror” “(prior to obsidian manufacturing ca. 6000 B.C)” “was wherever water” “could be found.” “Its interesting” “mirrors have been around” “before humans—its funny” “animals and humans” “get born into” “a world of mirrors,” “therefore, simulation” “is always already” “a given—” “a sparkly consequence to be born with a dbl.” NOTES 1. Notley, Alice. “Author’s Note” in The Descent of Alette (New York, 1996) 2. Bruns, Gerald L. “ From Intransitive Speech to the Universe of Discourse” in Modern Poetry And The Idea of Language (New Haven & London, 1974), p.75 3. Ibid. p.77 4. Notley, Alice. The Descent of Alette (New York, 1996). p.3 5. Ibid. p.10 6. Ibid i. p.9 7. Ibid ii. p.16 8. Ibid iii. p.12. (shrink)
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  25. Brian Gregor (2007). Conspiracy and Imprisonment: 1940–1945. By Dietrich Bonhoeffer. Ed. Mark S. Brocker. Transl. Lisa E. Dahillthe Bonhoeffer Legacy: Post-Holocaust Perspectives. By Stephen R. Haynes. [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 48 (6):1027–1030.score: 84.6
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  26. J. B. Glasgow (1996). Book Reviews : Discipleship and Family Ties in Mark and Matthew, by Stephen C. Barton. Cambridge University Press, 1994. Xiii + 261 Pp. Hb. 35. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 9 (1):47-50.score: 84.6
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  27. Ayelet Haimson Lushkov (2014). (V.E.) Pagán Conspiracy Theory in Latin Literature. Foreword by Mark Fenster. Pp. Xvi + 182. Austin: University of Texas Press, 2012. Cased, US$55. ISBN: 978-0-292-73972-7. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 64 (1):153-155.score: 84.6
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  28. Alan M. Stahl (1988). Philip Grierson and Mark Blackburn, Medieval European Coinage, with a Catalogue of the Coins in the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge, 1: The Early Middle Ages (Fifth–Tenth Centuries). Foreword by Graham Pollard. Cambridge, Eng.: Cambridge University Press, 1986. Pp. Xxi, 674; 65 Plates, 6 Maps, 28 Tables. [REVIEW] Speculum 63 (4):933-935.score: 84.6
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  29. James McBain (2013). Ethics Without Morals: A Defense of Amorality, by Joel Marks. Teaching Philosophy 36 (3):306-310.score: 84.0
  30. N. Ángel Pinillos (forthcoming). Knowledge, Experiments and Practical Interests. In Jessica Brown & MIkkel Gerken (eds.), New Essays On Knowledge Ascriptions. Oxford University Press.score: 81.0
    Recently, some philosophers have defended the idea that knowledge is an interest-relative notion. According to this thesis, whether an agent knows P may depend on the practical costs of her being wrong about P. This perspective marks a radical departure from traditional accounts that take knowledge to be a purely intellectual concept. I think there is much to say on behalf of the interest-relative notion. In this paper, I report on some new evidence which strongly suggests that ordinary people’s (...)
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  31. Graham Harman (2011). Meillassoux's Virtual Future. Continent 1 (2):78-91.score: 81.0
    continent. 1.2 (2011): 78-91. This article consists of three parts. First, I will review the major themes of Quentin Meillassoux’s After Finitude . Since some of my readers will have read this book and others not, I will try to strike a balance between clear summary and fresh critique. Second, I discuss an unpublished book by Meillassoux unfamiliar to all readers of this article, except those scant few that may have gone digging in the microfilm archives of the École normale (...)
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  32. K. C. Stotz & Paul E. Griffiths (2002). Dancing in the Dark: Evolutionary Psychology and the Argument From Design. In S. J. Scher & F. Rauscher (eds.), Evolutionary Psychology: Alternative Approaches. Kluwer.score: 81.0
    The Narrow Evolutionary Psychology Movement represents itself as a major reorientation of the social/behavioral sciences, a group of sciences previously dominated by something called the ‘Standard Social Science Model’ (SSSM; Cosmides, Tooby, and Barkow, 1992). Narrow Evolutionary Psychology alleges that the SSSM treated the mind, and particularly those aspects of the mind that exhibit cultural variation, as devoid of any marks of its evolutionary history. Adherents of Narrow Evolutionary Psychology often suggest that the SSSM owed more to ideology than (...)
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  33. Francis Jeffry Pelletier & Edward N. Zalta (2000). How to Say Goodbye to the Third Man. Noûs 34 (2):165–202.score: 81.0
    In (1991), Meinwald initiated a major change of direction in the study of Plato’s Parmenides and the Third Man Argument. On her conception of the Parmenides , Plato’s language systematically distinguishes two types or kinds of predication, namely, predications of the kind ‘x is F pros ta alla’ and ‘x is F pros heauto’. Intuitively speaking, the former is the common, everyday variety of predication, which holds when x is any object (perceptible object or Form) and F is a property (...)
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  34. Peter J. Carrington (1979). Schutz on Transcendental Intersubjectivity in Husserl. Human Studies 2 (1):95 - 110.score: 81.0
    In his paper on transcendental intersubjectivity in Husserl, which refers mainly to the Fifth Cartesian Meditation, Schutz (1966a) marks out four stages in Husserl's argument and finds what are for him insurmountable problems in each stage. These stages are: (1) isolation of the primordial world of one's peculiar ownness by means of a further epoche; (2) apperception of the other via pairing; (3) constitution of objective, intersubjective Nature; (4) constitution of higher forms of community. Because of the problems Schutz (...)
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  35. Stefano Predelli (2003). Scare Quotes and Their Relation to Other Semantic Issues. Linguistics and Philosophy 26 (1):1-28.score: 81.0
    The main aim of this paper is that of providing a unified analysis for some interesting uses of quotation marks, including so-called scare quotes. The phenomena exemplified by the cases I discuss have remained relatively unexplored, notwithstanding a growing interest in the behavior of quotation marks. They are, however, of no lesser interest than other, more widely studied effectsachieved with the help of quotationmarks. In particular, as I argue in whatfollows, scare quotes and other similar instances bear interesting (...)
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  36. Glenn Parsons (2008). Teaching & Learning Guide For: The Aesthetics of Nature. Philosophy Compass 3 (5):1106-1112.score: 81.0
    Traditionally, analytic philosophers writing on aesthetics have given short shrift to nature. The last thirty years, however, have seen a steady growth of interest in this area. The essays and books now available cover central philosophical issues concerning the nature of the aesthetic and the existence of norms for aesthetic judgement. They also intersect with important issues in environmental philosophy. More recent contributions have opened up new topics, such as the relationship between natural sound and music, the beauty of animals, (...)
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  37. Ernest Lepore, The Scope and Limits of Quotation.score: 81.0
    A standard view about the quotation is that ‘the result of enclosing any expression...in quotation marks is a constant singular term’ [Wallace 1972, p.237]. There is little sense in treating the entire complex of an expression flanked by a right and left quotation mark, a quotation term for short, as a ‘constant singular term’ of a language L if that complex is not, in some sense, itself a constituent of L. So, just as (1) contains twenty-seven tokened symbols (including (...)
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  38. Murali Ramachandran (1995). Methodological Reflections on Two Kripkean Strategies. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 95:67 - 81.score: 81.0
    Aims. Saul Kripke’s (1977) argument defending Russell’s theory of (definite) descriptions (RTD) against the possible objection that Donnellan’s (1966) distinction between attributive and referential uses of descriptions marks a semantic ambiguity has been highly influential.1 Yet, as I hope you’ll be persuaded, Kripke’s line of reasoning— in particular, the ‘thought-experiment’ it involves—has not been duly explored. In section II, I argue that while Kripke’s argument does ward off a fairly ill-motivated ambiguity theory, it is far from clear whether it (...)
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  39. John Wilson (1972). A Comment on the Article ' Wilson on the Justification of Punishment' by Mark Fisher and Grenville Wall inJournal of Moral Education,Vol 1, No 3, P 203. [REVIEW] Journal of Moral Education 1 (3):245-246.score: 81.0
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  40. Vincent W. J. Van Gerven Oei (2012). Cumposition: Theses on Philosophy's Etymology. Continent 2 (1).score: 81.0
    continent. 2.1 (2012): 44–55. Philosophers are sperm, poetry erupts sperm and dribbles, philosopher recodes term, to terminate, —A. Staley Groves 1 There is, in the relation of human languages to that of things, something that can be approximately described as “overnaming”—the deepest linguistic reason for all melancholy and (from the point of view of the thing) for all deliberate muteness. Overnaming as the linguistic being of melancholy points to another curious relation of language: the overprecision that obtains in the tragic (...)
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  41. M. S. Northcott (2004). The Market, the Multitude and Metaphysics: Ronald Preston's Middle Way and the Theological Critique of Economic Reason. Studies in Christian Ethics 17 (2):104-117.score: 81.0
    The European post-Marxist work Empire by Hardt and Negri points to the theological/metaphysical underpinnings of modernity and global capitalism in the medieval shift from Trinitarian orthodoxy to nominalism. Though Hardt and Negri reject religious or transcendental approaches to the social, their work shows remarkable resemblances with the ontological critique of modernity and economism mounted by John Milbank and Stephen Long among others. By contrast the considerable oeuvre of Ronald Preston on capitalism lacks a deep ontological critique. The return of (...)
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  42. Claudius Messner (2014). Introduction to Special Issue SI: Luhmann. International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 27 (2):313-324.score: 81.0
    This year marks the 30th anniversary of the publication of Niklas Luhmann’s (1927–1998) magnum opus Soziale Systeme. Grundriss einer allgemeinen Theorie [14]. On the occasion, this Special Issue of the International Journal for the Semiotics of Law celebrates the contribution of Luhmann’s thinking to our understanding of law, justice, and society.Luhmann’s work is wide open for argument. Some consider it the grand unified theory able to completely grasp social reality. Others see nothing but a substantially void conglomeration of analytical (...)
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  43. Tadeusz Szubka (2011). Główne typy metafizyki analitycznej. Filo-Sofija 11 (15 (2011/4)).score: 81.0
    Author: Szubka Tadeusz Title: MAIN VARIETIES OF ANALYTIC METAPHYSICS (Główne typy metafizyki analitycznej) Source: Filo-Sofija year: 2011, vol:.15, number: 2011/4, pages: 849-864 Keywords: ANALYTIC METAPHYSICS, G.E. MOORE, B. RUSSELL, P.F. STRAWSON, D. DAVIDSON, M. DUMMETT, W.V. QUINE, D.M. ARMSTRONG, D. LEWIS. Discipline: PHILOSOPHY Language: POLISH Document type: ARTICLE Publication order reference (Primary author’s office address): E-mail: www:In a widespread general view about analytic philosophy it is often emphasized the supposed animosity or mistrust of that movement towards metaphysics. That opinion is (...)
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  44. Jeroen Mettes (2012). Political Poetry: A Few Notes. Poetics for N30. Continent 2 (1):29-35.score: 81.0
    continent. 2.1 (2012): 29–35. Translated by Vincent W.J. van Gerven Oei from Jeroen Mettes. "Politieke Poëzie: Enige aantekeningen, Poëtica bij N30 (versie 2006)." In Weerstandbeleid: Nieuwe kritiek . Amsterdam: De wereldbibliotheek, 2011. Published with permission of Uitgeverij Wereldbibliotheek, Amsterdam. L’égalité veut d’autres lois . —Eugène Pottier The modern poem does not have form but consistency (that is sensed), no content but a problem (that is developed). Consistency + problem = composition. The problem of modern poetry is capitalism. Capitalism—which has no (...)
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  45. Randy E. Barnett, Post-Chicago Law and Economics.score: 81.0
    This is not another "law-and-econ" bashing symposium. Nor is the symposium's title intended to denigrate Chicago School law and economics any more than the term "Post-Keynesian economics" was intended to denigrate the work of John Maynard Keynes. Instead, this symposium marks the fact that many practitioners of law and economics have moved well beyond the stereotypes familiar to most legal academics. Rather than designating an entirely new school of thought, the term "Post-Chicago law and economics" refers to a new (...)
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  46. Paul Griffiths, Dancing in the Dark: Evolutionary Psychology and the Argument From Design.score: 81.0
    The Narrow Evolutionary Psychology Movement represents itself as a major reorientation of the social/behavioral sciences, a group of sciences previously dominated by something called the ‘Standard Social Science Model’ (SSSM; Cosmides, Tooby, and Barkow, 1992). Narrow Evolutionary Psychology alleges that the SSSM treated the mind, and particularly those aspects of the mind that exhibit cultural variation, as devoid of any marks of its evolutionary history. Adherents of Narrow Evolutionary Psychology often suggest that the SSSM owed more to ideology than (...)
     
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  47. Levinasian Mediation (forthcoming). Abel, Oliver, Et Al. La Juste Mémoire: Lectures Autour de Paul Ricoeur. Fribourg: Labor Et Fides, 2006. 22.00 Pb. Almeida, Rogério Miranda De. Nietzsche and Paradox. Translated by Mark S. Roberts. Albany: SUNY Press, 2006. $55.00 Arriaga, Manuel P. The Modernist-Postmodernist Quarrel on Philosophy and Justice: A Possible. [REVIEW] Philosophy Today.score: 81.0
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  48. Adam S. Wilkins (1987). From Molecules and Cells to Developmental Process: Single Cell Marking and Cell Lineage in Animal Development. Edited by R. L. GARDNER and P. A. LAWRENCE, 1986. The Royal Society, London. Pp. 187. £41.50. And Molecular Biology of Development. Cold Spring Harbor Symposium of Quantitative Biology, Vol. 50, 1985. Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, New York. Pp. 920. $140. Paperback $70. [REVIEW] Bioessays 6 (2):97-97.score: 81.0
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  49. Brendan Carmody (2011). Mission in the 21st Century: Exploring the Five Marks of Global Mission. Edited by Andrew Walls and Cathy Ross. Heythrop Journal 52 (5):908-909.score: 72.0
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  50. Benjamin Murphy (2011). Why I Am Not A Scientist: Anthropology and Modern Knowledge. By Jonathan Marks. Heythrop Journal 52 (2):353-353.score: 72.0
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