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Profile: Margaret Gilbert (University of California, Irvine)
Profile: Margaret Gilbert (University of California, Irvine)
Profile: Margaret Patricia Gilbert (University of California, Irvine)
Profile: Peter Gilbert (CUNY Graduate Center)
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Profile: Mike Gilbert (University of Massachusetts, Boston)
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Profile: Marcus Gilbert (University of York)
Profile: Fred Gilbert (University of Tasmania)
Profile: Joseph Gilbert (Southern Methodist University)
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  1.  48
    Margaret Gilbert (1989). On Social Facts. Routledge.
    This book offers original accounts of a number of central social phenomena, many of which have received little if any prior philosophical attention. These phenomena include social groups, group languages, acting together, collective belief, mutual recognition, and social convention. In the course of developing her analyses Gilbert discusses the work of Emile Durkheim, Georg Simmel, Max Weber, David Lewis, among others.
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  2.  30
    Margaret Gilbert (2006). A Theory of Political Obligation: Membership, Commitment, and the Bonds of Society. OUP Oxford.
    Margaret Gilbert offers an incisive new approach to a classic problem of political philosophy: when and why should I do what the law tells me to do? Do I have special obligations to conform to the laws of my own country and if so, why? In what sense, if any, must I fight in wars in which my country is engaged, if ordered to do so, or suffer the penalty for law-breaking the law imposes - including the death penalty? Gilbert's (...)
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  3.  8
    Margaret Gilbert (2000). Sociality and Responsibility: New Essays in Plural Subject Theory. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    One of the most distinguished living social philosophers, Margaret Gilbert develops and extends her application of plural subject theory of human sociality, first introduced in her earlier works On Social Facts and Living Together. Sociality and Responsibility presents an extended discussion of her proposal that joint commitments inherently involve obligations and rights, proposing, in effect, a new theory of obligations and rights. In addition, it demonstrates the extensive range and fruitfulness of plural subject theory by presenting accounts of social rules, (...)
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  4. Margaret Gilbert (2015). Joint Commitment: How We Make the Social World. Oxford University Press Usa.
    In this wide-ranging collection of essays, distinguished philosopher Margaret Gilbert investigates the structure of our social world. People often speak of what we do, think, and feel, and of our values, conventions, and laws. Asking what we mean by such talk, Gilbert invokes the foundational idea of joint commitment. She applies this idea to topics ranging from the mutual recognition of two people to the unity of the European Union, from marital love to patriotism, from promissory obligation to the rights (...)
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  5.  14
    Andrew Crane, Dirk Ulrich Gilbert, Kenneth E. Goodpaster, Marcia P. Miceli & Geoff Moore (2011). Comments on BEQ's Twentieth Anniversary Forum on New Directions for Business Ethics Research. Business Ethics Quarterly 21 (1):157-187.
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  6.  12
    Dirk Ulrich Gilbert & Andreas Rasche (2007). Discourse Ethics and Social Accountability: The Ethics of SA 8000. Business Ethics Quarterly 17 (2):187-216.
    Based on theoretical insights of discourse ethics as developed by Jürgen Habermas, we delineate a proposal to further develop theinstitutionalization of social accounting in multinational corporations by means of “Social Accountability 8000” . First, we discuss the cornerstones of Habermas’s discourse ethics and elucidate how and why this concept can provide a theoretical justification of the moral point of view in MNCs. Second, the basic conception, main purpose, and implementation procedure of SA 8000 are presented. Third, we critically examine SA (...)
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  7. Margaret Gilbert (1987). Modelling Collective Belief. Synthese 73 (1):185-204.
    What is it for a group to believe something? A summative account assumes that for a group to believe that p most members of the group must believe that p. Accounts of this type are commonly proposed in interpretation of everyday ascriptions of beliefs to groups. I argue that a nonsummative account corresponds better to our unexamined understanding of such ascriptions. In particular I propose what I refer to as the joint acceptance model of group belief. I argue that group (...)
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  8. Sébastien Calvignac‐Spencer, Fabian H. Leendertz, M. Thomas P. Gilbert & Grit Schubert (2013). An Invertebrate Stomach's View on Vertebrate Ecology. Bioessays 35 (11):1004-1013.
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  9. Michael Gilbert (2014). Arguing with People. Broadview Press.
    _Arguing with People_ brings developments from the field of Argumentation Theory to bear on critical thinking in a clear and accessible way. This book expands the critical thinking toolkit, and shows how those tools can be applied in the hurly-burly of everyday arguing. Gilbert emphasizes the importance of understanding real arguments, understanding just who you are arguing with, and knowing how to use that information for successful argumentation. Interesting examples and partner exercises are provided to demonstrate tangible ways in which (...)
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  10. Margaret Gilbert (2009). Shared Intention and Personal Intentions. Philosophical Studies 144 (1):167 - 187.
    This article explores the question: what is it for two or more people to intend to do something in the future? In a technical phrase, what is it for people to share an intention ? Extending and refining earlier work of the author’s, it argues for three criteria of adequacy for an account of shared intention (the disjunction, concurrence, and obligation criteria) and offers an account that satisfies them. According to this account, in technical terms explained in the paper, people (...)
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  11. R. Edward Freeman & Daniel R. Gilbert (1992). Corporate Strategy and the Search for Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 11 (7):514-554.
     
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  12.  47
    Margaret Gilbert (1993). Agreements, Coercion, and Obligation. Ethics 103 (4):679-706.
    Typical agreements can be seen as joint decisions, inherently involving obligations of a distinctive kind. These obligations derive from the joint commitment' that underlies a joint decision. One consequence of this understanding of agreements and their obligations is that coerced agreements are possible and impose obligations. It is not that the parties to an agreement should always conform to it, all things considered. Unless one is released from the agreement, however, one has some reason to conform to it, whatever else (...)
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  13. Margaret Gilbert (2006). Who's to Blame? Collective Moral Responsibility and its Implications for Group Members. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 30 (1):94–114.
  14. Margaret P. Gilbert (2004). Collective Epistemology. Episteme 1 (2):95--107.
    This paper introduces the author's approach to everyday ascriptions of collective cognitive states as in such statements as we believe he is lying. Collective epistemology deals with these ascriptions attempting to understand them and the phenomena in question.
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  15. Margaret P. Gilbert (1990). Walking Together: A Paradigmatic Social Phenomenon. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 15 (1):1-14.
    The everyday concept of a social group is approached by examining the concept of going for a walk together, an example of doing something together, or "shared action". Two analyses requiring shared personal goals are rejected, since they fail to explain how people walking together have obligations and rights to appropriate behavior, and corresponding rights of rebuke. An alternative account is proposed: those who walk together must constitute the "plural subject" of a goal. The nature of plural subjecthood, the thesis (...)
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  16. Margaret Gilbert & Daniel Pilchman (2014). Belief, Acceptance, and What Happens in Groups. In Jennifer Lackey (ed.), Essays in Collective Epistemology. Oxford University Press
    This paper argues for a methodological point that bears on a relatively long-standing debate concerning collective beliefs in the sense elaborated by Margaret Gilbert: are they cases of belief or rather of acceptance? It is argued that epistemological accounts and distinctions developed in individual epistemology on the basis of considering the individual case are not necessarily applicable to the collective case or, more generally, uncritically to be adopted in collective epistemology.
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  17.  53
    Dirk Ulrich Gilbert & Andreas Rasche (2008). Opportunities and Problems of Standardized Ethics Initiatives – a Stakeholder Theory Perspective. Journal of Business Ethics 82 (3):755 - 773.
    This article explains problems and opportunities created by standardized ethics initiatives (e.g., the UN Global Compact, the Global Reporting Initiative, and SA 8000) from the perspective of stakeholder theory. First, we outline differences and commonalities among currently existing initiatives and thus generate a common ground for our discussion. Second, based on these remarks, we critically evaluate standardized ethics initiatives by drawing on descriptive, instrumental, and normative stakeholder theory. In doing so, we explain why these standards are helpful tools when it (...)
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  18. Andrew Gilbert (2013). Book Review: Chamsy El-Ojeili, Politics, Social Theory, Utopia and the World System: Arguments in Political Sociology. [REVIEW] Thesis Eleven 117 (1):144-146.
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  19.  14
    Frederic Gilbert, Andrej Vranic & Samia Hurst (2013). Involuntary & Voluntary Invasive Brain Surgery: Ethical Issues Related to Acquired Aggressiveness. [REVIEW] Neuroethics 6 (1):115-128.
    Clinical cases of frontal lobe lesions have been significantly associated with acquired aggressive behaviour. Restoring neuronal and cognitive faculties of aggressive individuals through invasive brain intervention raises ethical questions in general. However, more questions have to be addressed in cases where individuals refuse surgical treatment. The ethical desirability and permissibility of using intrusive surgical brain interventions for involuntary or voluntary treatment of acquired aggressiveness is highly questionable. This article engages with the description of acquired aggressiveness in general, and presents a (...)
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  20. Margaret P. Gilbert (2008). Social Convention Revisited. Topoi (1-2):5-16.
    This article will compare and contrast two very different accounts of convention: the game-theoretical account of Lewis in Convention, and the account initially proposed by Margaret Gilbert (the present author) in chapter six of On Social Facts, and further elaborated here. Gilbert’s account is not a variant of Lewis’s. It was arrived at in part as the result of a detailed critique of Lewis’s account in relation to a central everyday concept of a social convention. An account of convention need (...)
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  21. Margaret P. Gilbert (2009). Obligation and Joint Commitment. Utilitas 11 (2):143.
    I argue that obligations of an important type inhere in what I call 'joint commitments'. I propose a joint commitment account of everyday agreements. This could explain why some philosophers believe that we know of the obligating nature of agreements a priori. I compare and contrast obligations of joint commitment with obligations in the relatively narrow sense recommended by H. L. A. Hart, a recommendation that has been influential. Some central contexts in which Hart takes there to be obligations in (...)
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  22. Margaret Gilbert (1989). Folk Psychology Takes Sociality Seriously. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 12 (4):707.
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  23.  90
    M. Gilbert (2002). Belief and Acceptance as Features of Groups. Protosociology 16:35-69.
    In everyday discourse groups or collectives are often said to believe this or that. The author has previously developed an account of the phenomenon to which such collective belief statements refer. According to this account, in terms that are explained, a group believes that p if its members are jointly committed to believe that p as a body. Those who fulfill these conditions are referred to here as collectively believing* that p. Some philosophers – here labeled rejectionists – have argued (...)
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  24.  16
    Andreas Rasche & Dirk Ulrich Gilbert (2012). Institutionalizing Global Governance: The Role of the United Nations Global Compact. Business Ethics 21 (1):100-114.
    The United Nations Global Compact – which is a Global Public Policy Network advocating 10 universal principles in the areas of human rights, labor standards, environmental protection, and anticorruption – has turned into the world's largest corporate responsibility initiative. Although the Global Compact is often characterized as a promising way to address global governance gaps, it remains largely unclear why this is the case. To address this problem, we discuss to what extent the initiative represents an institutional solution to exercise (...)
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  25.  12
    Judy N. Muthuri & Victoria Gilbert (2011). An Institutional Analysis of Corporate Social Responsibility in Kenya. Journal of Business Ethics 98 (3):467 - 483.
    There is little doubt that Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) is now a global concept and a prominent feature of international business, with its practice localised and differing across countries. Despite the growing body of research focussing on CSR in developing countries, there is dearth research on CSR institutionalisation in African countries. Drawing on institutional theory (IT), this article examines the focus and form of CSR practice of companies in Kenya. It is evident from our findings that the nature and orientation (...)
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  26. Margaret Gilbert (2002). Collective Guilt and Collective Guilt Feelings. Journal of Ethics 6 (2):115-143.
    Among other things, this paper considers what so-called collective guilt feelings amount to. If collective guilt feelings are sometimes appropriate, it must be the case that collectives can indeed be guilty. The paper begins with an account of what it is for a collective to intend to do something and to act in light of that intention. An account of collective guilt in terms of membership guilt feelings is found wanting. Finally, a "plural subject" account of collective guilt feelings is (...)
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  27.  35
    Bette Ann Stead & Jackie Gilbert (2001). Ethical Issues in Electronic Comemrce. Journal of Business Ethics 34 (2):75 - 85.
    This article reviews the incredible growth of electronic commerce (e-commerce) and presents ethical issues that have emerged. Security concerns, spamming, Web sites that do not carry an "advertising" label, cybersquatters, online marketing to children, conflicts of interest, manufacturers competing with intermediaries online, and "dinosaurs" are discussed. The power of the Internet to spotlight issues is noted as a significant force in providing a kind of self-regulation that supports an ethical e-commerce environment.
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  28.  10
    Michael A. Gilbert (1995). Coalescent Argumentation. Argumentation 9 (5):837-852.
    Coalescent argumentation is a normative ideal that involves the joining together of two disparate claims through recognition and exploration of opposing positions. By uncovering the crucial connection between a claim and the attitudes, beliefs, feelings, values and needs to which it is connected dispute partners are able to identify points of agreement and disagreement. These points can then be utilized to effect coalescence, a joining or merging of divergent positions, by forming the basis for a mutual investigation of non-conflictual options (...)
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  29.  30
    Frederic Gilbert (2013). Deep Brain Stimulation for Treatment Resistant Depression: Postoperative Feelings of Self-Estrangement, Suicide Attempt and Impulsive–Aggressive Behaviours. Neuroethics 6 (3):473-481.
    The goal of this article is to shed light on Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) postoperative suicidality risk factors within Treatment Resistant Depression (TRD) patients, in particular by focusing on the ethical concern of enrolling patient with history of self-estrangement, suicide attempts and impulsive–aggressive inclinations. In order to illustrate these ethical issues we report and review a clinical case associated with postoperative feelings of self-estrangement, self-harm behaviours and suicide attempt leading to the removal of DBS devices. Could prospectively identifying and (...)
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  30.  55
    Jacqueline A. Gilbert, Bette Ann Stead & John M. Ivancevich (1999). Diversity Management: A New Organizational Paradigm. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 21 (1):61 - 76.
    Currently, an increasing number of organizations are attempting to enhance inclusiveness of under represented individuals through proactive efforts to manage their diversity. In this article, we define diversity management against the backdrop of its predecessor, affirmative action. Next, selected examples of organizations that have experienced specific positive bottom line results from diversity management strategies are discussed. The present paper also provides a conceptual model to examine antecedents and consequences of effective diversity management. Additional research areas identified from the model and (...)
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  31.  28
    Margaret Gilbert (2013). Joint Commitment: How We Make the Social World. OUP Usa.
    This new essay collection by distinguished philosopher Margaret Gilbert provides a richly textured argument for the importance of joint commitment in our personal and public lives. Topics covered by this diverse range of essays range from marital love to patriotism, from promissory obligation to the unity of the European Union.
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  32.  14
    Paul W. Burgess, Iroise Dumontheil & Sam J. Gilbert (2007). The Gateway Hypothesis of Rostral Prefrontal Cortex Function. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 11 (7):290-298.
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  33.  20
    Frederic Gilbert (2012). The Burden of Normality: From 'Chronically Ill' to 'Symptom Free'. New Ethical Challenges for Deep Brain Stimulation Postoperative Treatment. Journal of Medical Ethics 8 (7):408-412.
    Although an invasive medical intervention, Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) has been regarded as an efficient and safe treatment of Parkinson’s disease for the last 20 years. In terms of clinical ethics, it is worth asking whether the use of DBS may have unanticipated negative effects similar to those associated with other types of psychosurgery. Clinical studies of epileptic patients who have undergone an anterior temporal lobectomy have identified a range of side effects and complications in a number of domains: psychological, (...)
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  34.  91
    Margaret Gilbert (1983). Agreements, Conventions, and Language. Synthese 54 (3):375 - 407.
    The question whether and in what way languages and language use involve convention is addressed, With special reference to David Lewis's account of convention in general. Data are presented which show that Lewis has not captured the sense of 'convention' involved when we speak of adopting a linguistic convention. He has, In effect, attempted an account of social conventions. An alternative account of social convention and an account of linguistic convention are sketched.
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  35.  19
    Dirk Ulrich Gilbert & Michael Behnam (2009). Advancing Integrative Social Contracts Theory: A Habermasian Perspective. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 89 (2):215 - 234.
    We critically assess integrative social contracts theory (ISCT) and show that the concept particularly lacks of moral justification of substantive hypernorms. By drawing on Habermasian philosophy, in particular discourse ethics and its recent application in the theory of deliberative democracy , we further advance ISCT and show that social contracting in business ethics requires a well-justified procedural rather than a substantive focus for managing stakeholder relations. We also replace the monological concept of hypothetical thought experiments in ISCT by a concept (...)
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  36.  7
    Dirk Ulrich Gilbert & Andreas Rasche (2007). Discourse Ethics and Social Accountability. Business Ethics Quarterly 17 (2):187-216.
    Based on theoretical insights of discourse ethics as developed by Jürgen Habermas, we delineate a proposal to further develop theinstitutionalization of social accounting in multinational corporations (MNCs) by means of “Social Accountability 8000” (SA 8000). First, we discuss the cornerstones of Habermas’s discourse ethics and elucidate how and why this concept can provide a theoretical justification of the moral point of view in MNCs. Second, the basic conception, main purpose, and implementation procedure of SA 8000 are presented. Third, we critically (...)
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  37. Margaret Gilbert, Andrew Mason, Elizabeth S. Anderson, J. David Velleman, Matthew H. Kramer, Michele M. Moody‐Adams & Martha C. Nussbaum (1999). 10. Lucius T. Outlaw, Jr., On Race and Philosophy Lucius T. Outlaw, Jr., On Race and Philosophy (Pp. 454-456). Ethics 109 (2).
     
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  38.  39
    Margaret Gilbert (2004). Scanlon on Promissory Obligation: The Problem of Promisees' Rights. Journal of Philosophy 101 (2):83 - 109.
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  39.  49
    Margaret Gilbert (1981). Game Theory Andconvention. Synthese 46 (1):41 - 93.
    A feature of David Lewis's account of conventions in his book "Convention" which has received admiring notices from philosophers is his use of the mathematical theory of games. In this paper I point out a number of serious flaws in Lewis's use of game theory. Lewis's basic claim is that conventions cover 'coordination problems'. I show that game-Theoretical analysis tends to establish that coordination problems in Lewis's sense need not underlie conventions.
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  40.  27
    Maureen O'Malley, Ingo Brigandt, Alan C. Love, John W. Crawford, Jack A. Gilbert, Rob Knight, Sandra D. Mitchell & Forest Rohwer (2014). Multilevel Research Strategies and Biological Systems. Philosophy of Science 81 (5):811-828.
    Multilevel research strategies characterize contemporary molecular inquiry into biological systems. We outline conceptual, methodological, and explanatory dimensions of these multilevel strategies in microbial ecology, systems biology, protein research, and developmental biology. This review of emerging lines of inquiry in these fields suggests that multilevel research in molecular life sciences has significant implications for philosophical understandings of explanation, modeling, and representation.
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  41.  9
    Frederic Gilbert & Ovadia Daniela (2011). Deep Brain Stimulation in the Media: Over-Optimistic Media Portrayals Calls for a New Strategy Involving Journalists and Scientifics in the Ethical Debate. Journal of Integrative in Neuroscience 5 (16).
    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is optimistically portrayed in contemporary media. This already happened with psychosurgery during the first half of the twentieth century. The tendency of popular media to hype the benefits of DBS therapies, without equally highlighting risks, fosters public expectations also due to the lack of ethical analysis in the scientific literature. Media are not expected (and often not prepared) to raise the ethical issues which remain unaddressed by the scientific community. To obtain a more objective portrayal of (...)
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  42.  26
    Scott F. Gilbert (2003). Evo-Devo, Devo-Evo, and Devgen-Popgen. Biology and Philosophy 18 (2):347-352.
  43.  2
    Scott F. Gilbert (2011). Expanding the Temporal Dimensions of Developmental Biology: The Role of Environmental Agents in Establishing Adult-Onset Phenotypes. Biological Theory 6 (1):65-72.
  44.  7
    Frederic Gilbert & Bradley J. Partridge (2012). The Need to Tackle Concussion in Australian Football Codes. Medical Journal of Australia 196 (9):561-563.
    Postmortem evidence of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) in the brains of American National Football League players who suffered concussions while playing have intensified concerns about the risks of concussion in sport.1 Concussions are frequently sustained by amateur and professional players of Australia’s three most popular football codes (Australian football, rugby league, and rugby union) and, to a lesser extent, other contact sports such as soccer. This raises major concerns about possible long-term neurological damage, cognitive impairment and mental health problems in (...)
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  45. Paul Gilbert (2003). Evolution, Social Roles, and the Differences in Shame and Guilt. Social Research: An International Quarterly 70 (4):1205-1230.
     
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  46.  15
    Iratxe Zarraonaindia, Daniel P. Smith & Jack A. Gilbert (2013). Beyond the Genome: Community-Level Analysis of the Microbial World. Biology and Philosophy 28 (2):261-282.
    The development of culture-independent strategies to study microbial diversity and function has led to a revolution in microbial ecology, enabling us to address fundamental questions about the distribution of microbes and their influence on Earth’s biogeochemical cycles. This article discusses some of the progress that scientists have made with the use of so-called “omic” techniques (metagenomics, metatranscriptomics, and metaproteomics) and the limitations and major challenges these approaches are currently facing. These ‘omic methods have been used to describe the taxonomic structure (...)
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  47.  7
    Michael Gilbert (2014). Arguing with People. Broadview Press.
    Arguing with People brings developments from the field of Argumentation Theory to bear on critical thinking in a clear and accessible way. This book expands the critical thinking toolkit, and shows how those tools can be applied in the hurly-burly of everyday arguing. Gilbert emphasizes the importance of understanding real arguments, understanding just who you are arguing with, and knowing how to use that information for successful argumentation. Interesting examples and partner exercises are provided to demonstrate tangible ways in which (...)
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  48.  5
    Paul Robert Gilbert (2013). Deskilling, Agrodiversity, and the Seed Trade: A View From Contemporary British Allotments. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 30 (1):101-114.
    Over the last half-century, quality control standards have had the perverse effect of restricting the circulation of non-commercially bred vegetable cultivars in Britain. Recent European and British legislation attempts to compensate for this loss of agrodiversity by relaxing genetic purity standards and the cost of seed marketing for designated “Amateur” and “Conservation” varieties. Drawing on fieldwork conducted at a British allotment site, this article cautions against bringing genetically heterogeneous cultivars into the commercial sphere. Such a move may intensify the horticultural (...)
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  49.  78
    Margaret P. Gilbert (1994). Remarks on Collective Belief. In Frederick F. Schmitt (ed.), Socializing Epistemology: The Social Dimensions of Knowledge. Rowman and Littlefield 235-56.
    The author develops and elaborates on her account of collective belief, something standardly referred to, in her view, when we speak of what we believe. This paper focuses on a special response hearers may experience in the context of expressions of belief, a response that may issue in offended rebukes to the speaker. It is argued that this response would be appropriate if both speakers and hearers were parties to what the authors calls a joint commitment to believe a certain (...)
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  50. Allan H. Gilbert (1940). The Wreath of Thorns in Paradise Regained. Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 3 (1/2):156-160.
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