Search results for 'Harvey S. James Jr' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. K. Hendrickson Mary, S. James Harvey & D. Heffernan William (2008). Does the World Need U.S. Farmers Even If Americans Don't? Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 21 (4).score: 412.5
    We consider the implications of trends in the number of U.S. farmers and food imports on the question of what role U.S. farmers have in an increasingly global agrifood system. Our discussion stems from the argument some scholars have made that American consumers can import their food more cheaply from other countries than it can produce it. We consider the distinction between U.S. farmers and agriculture and the effect of the U.S. food footprint on developing nations to argue there might (...)
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  2. Charles Harvey (1989). James M. Edie: 'Edmund Husserl’s Phenomenology: A Critical Commentary'. [REVIEW] Husserl Studies 6 (3).score: 390.0
  3. Barry Harvey (2002). Beginning in the Middle of Things: Following James McClendon's Systematic Theology. Modern Theology 18 (2):251-265.score: 390.0
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  4. Sandra Lee Bartky, Paul Benson, Sue Campbell, Claudia Card, Robin S. Dillon, Jean Harvey, Karen Jones, Charles W. Mills, James Lindemann Nelson, Margaret Urban Walker, Rebecca Whisnant & Catherine Wilson (2004). Moral Psychology: Feminist Ethics and Social Theory. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.score: 270.0
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  5. James L. Werth Jr (1999). When is a Mental Health Professional Competent to Assess a Person's Decision to Hasten Death? Ethics and Behavior 9 (2):141 – 157.score: 210.0
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  6. Roger D. Masters (1997). Book Review:Machiavelli's Virtue. Harvey C. Mansfield, Jr. [REVIEW] Ethics 107 (4):757-.score: 85.5
  7. Edward F. Mooney (2002). The Nature of True Virtue: Theology, Psychology, and Politics in the Writings of Henry James, Sr., Henry James, Jr., and William James. James Duban. Madison: Farleigh Dickinson University Press, 2001. 237 Pp. $43.50 Hard Copy, 0-8386-3888-0. Though Cumbersomely Titled, James Duban's The Nature of True Virtue is a Pithy. [REVIEW] Journal of Speculative Philosophy 16 (4):294.score: 85.5
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  8. A. Parel (1981). Books in Review : Ma Chia Velli's New Modes and Orders: A Stud Y of the Discourses on Livy by Harvey C. Mansfield, Jr. Ithaca and London: Cornell University Press, 1979. Pp. 460. $25.00. [REVIEW] Political Theory 9 (2):273-277.score: 85.5
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  9. James Walter (2005). Ava, Ava's New Testament Narratives: “When the Old Law Passed Away,” Trans. James A. Rushing Jr. (Medieval German Texts in Bilingual Editions, 2.) Kalamazoo, Mich.: Medieval Institute Publications, Western Michigan University, for TEAMS, 2003. Paper. Pp. Vii, 235; Black-and-White Figures. [REVIEW] Speculum 80 (3):828-829.score: 84.0
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  10. John D. Becker (1997). The Twenty-First Century and Questions of Ethics and War Legal and Moral Considerations on Low-Intensity Conflict, Alberto R. Coil, James S. Ord, and Stephen A. Rose (U.S. Naval War College International Law Studies, Volume 67, 1995), 387 Pp., Free of Charge. Ballistic Missile Defense in the Post–Cold War Era, David B. H. Denoon, (Boulder: Westview Press, 1991), 230 Pp., $61.50 Cloth. Conscience at War: The Israeli Soldier as a Moral Critic, Ruth Linn, (Albany: State University of New York Press, 1996), 245 Pp, $17.95 Paper. An Encyclopedia of War and Ethics, Donald A. Wells, Ed. (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1996), 552 Pp., $95.00 Cloth. “Values, Assumptions, and Policies,” Ralph Peters, Karl W. Eikenberry, Harvey M. Sapolsky, and Jeremy Shapiro in Parameters 26 (Summer 1996), 102–27, $7.50. [REVIEW] Ethics and International Affairs 11:295-298.score: 81.0
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  11. Lost Play (2013). Aldrete, Gregory S., Scott Bartell, and Alicia Aldrete. Reconstructing Ancient Linen Body Armor: Unraveling the Linothorax Mystery. Baltimore, Md.: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2013. X+ 279 Pp. Numerous Black-and-White and Color Ills. Cloth, $29.95. Anderson, James C., Jr. Roman Architecture in Provence. Cambridge: Cambridge. [REVIEW] American Journal of Philology 134:523-527.score: 81.0
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  12. Brian Richardson (1997). James Robert Goetsch, Jr., Vico's Axioms: The Geometry of the Human Wordl Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 17 (1):38-39.score: 81.0
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  13. Steven Béla Várdy (1996). János M. Bak, Pál Engel, and James Ross Sweeney, Eds. And Trans., in Collaboration with Paul B. Harvey Jr., The Laws of the Medieval Kingdom of Hungary/Decreta Regni Mediaevalis Hungariae, 2: 1301–1457.(The Laws of East Central Europe: The Laws of Hungary, 1/2.) Salt Lake City: Charles Schlacks, Jr., 1992. Pp. Lv, 294 (Page Nos. 1–153 Repeated); 1 Black-and-White Illustration, 2 Maps, Tables. $150. [REVIEW] Speculum 71 (2):386-387.score: 81.0
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  14. Roxana Havrici (2010). Gerrie ter Haar Oi James J. Busuttil (Eds.), The Freedom to Do God's Will. Religious Fundamentalism and Social Change. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 4 (10):244-245.score: 72.0
    Gerrie ter Haar oi James J. Busuttil (eds.), The Freedom to Do God’s Will. Religious Fundamentalism and Social Change Routledge, London and New York, 2003.
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  15. Harvey S. James Jr & Jeffrey P. Cohen (2004). Does Ethics Training Neutralize the Incentives of the Prisoner's Dilemma? Evidence From a Classroom Experiment. Journal of Business Ethics 50 (1):53 - 61.score: 61.5
    Teaching economics has been shown to encourage students to defect in a prisoner's dilemma game. However, can ethics training reverse that effect and promote cooperation? We conducted an experiment to answer this question. We found that students who had the ethics module had higher rates of cooperation than students without the ethics module, even after controlling for communication and other factors expected to affect cooperation. We conclude that the teaching of ethics can mitigate the possible adverse incentives of the prisoner's (...)
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  16. Jaime Nubiola & Izaskun Martínez (2003). The Reception of W. James in Spain and Unamuno's Reading of Varieties. Streams of William James 5 (2):7-9.score: 57.0
    Our aim in this article, after providing the general framework of the reception of William James in Spain, is to trace the reception of The Varieties of Religious Experience through Unamuno’s reading of this book.
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  17. Jennifer Welchman (2006). William James's "the Will to Believe" and the Ethics of Self-Experimentation. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 42 (2):229-241.score: 57.0
    : William James's "The Will to Believe" has been criticized for offering untenable arguments in support of belief in unvalidated hypotheses. Although James is no longer accused of suggesting we can create belief ex nihilo, critics continue to charge that James's defense of belief in what he called the "religious hypothesis" confuses belief with hypothesis adoption and endorses willful persistence in unvalidated beliefs—not, as he claimed, in pursuit of truth, but merely to avoid the emotional stress of (...)
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  18. Paul Jerome Croce (2007). Mankind's Own Providence: From Swedenborgian Philosophy of Use to William James's Pragmatism. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 43 (3):490 - 508.score: 57.0
    : It is part of the conventional wisdom about the James family that the elder Henry James (1811–82) had a large influence on his son, William James (1842–1910), in the direction of religious interests. But William neither adopted his father's spirituality nor did he regard it as a foil to his own secularity. Instead, after first rejecting the elder James's idiosyncratic faith, he became increasingly intrigued with his insights into the natural world, which were in turn (...)
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  19. James T. Kloppenberg (2009). James's Pragmatism and American Culture, 1907-2007. In John J. Stuhr (ed.), 100 Years of Pragmatism: William James's Revolutionary Philosophy. Indiana University Press.score: 57.0
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  20. Sami Pihlström (2006). Review: Lynn Bridgers. Contemporary Varieties of Religious Experience: James's Classic Study in Light of Resiliency, Temperament, and Trauma. Rowman & Littlefield, 2005. [REVIEW] Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 42 (3):454-458.score: 57.0
    Pihlstrom's review of Lynn Bridges book on James, The Varieties of Religious Experience and contemporary varieties.
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  21. James O. Pawelski (2001). Heaven's Champion: William James's Philosophy of Religion (Review). [REVIEW] Journal of Speculative Philosophy 15 (1):56-61.score: 57.0
    William James is notorious for the large number of inconsistencies and at least apparent contradictions in his writings. Many readers conclude that he should be appreciated more for his profound but erratic insights than for any coherent philosophical perspective. Ellen Kappy Suckiel disagrees. She argues that James is far more careful and systematic than many readers realize. Her work on James is guided by the attempt to lay bare his coherent philosophical vision and the consistent philosophical methodology (...)
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  22. W. E. Cooper (1990). William James's Theory of Mind. Journal of the History of Philosophy (October) 571 (October):571-593.score: 54.0
    Neutral monist, panpsychist, naturalist, and phenomenological interpretations of James's theory of mind are canvassed. Culling the true tenets from each, I make a case for a reconciling view on the basis of a distinction between mental and proto-mental properties. The resulting interpretation is compared to two forms of panpsychism identified by T Nagel in his essay of that name.
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  23. Alexander Klein (2009). On Hume on Space: Green's Attack, James' Empirical Response. Journal of the History of Philosophy 47 (3):pp. 415-449.score: 54.0
    ABSTRACT. Associationist psychologists of the late 19th-century premised their research on a fundamentally Humean picture of the mind. So the very idea of mental science was called into question when T. H. Green, a founder of British idealism, wrote an influential attack on Hume’s Treatise. I first analyze Green’s interpretation and criticism of Hume, situating his reading with respect to more recent Hume scholarship. I focus on Green’s argument that Hume cannot consistently admit real ideas of spatial relations. I then (...)
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  24. Henry Jackman, Wittgenstein & James's Stream of Thought.score: 54.0
    William James has been characterized as “the major whipping boy of the later Wittgenstein,” and the currency of this impression of the relation between James and Wittgenstein is understandable. Reading Wittgenstein and his commentators can leave one with the impression that James was a badly muddled “exponent of the tradition in the philosophy of mind that [Wittgenstein] was opposing.” There have been recent attempts to resist this trend, but even these tend to focus on the affinities between (...)
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  25. Alexander Klein (2008). Divide Et Impera! William James's Pragmatist Tradition in the Philosophy of Science. Philosophical Topics 36 (1):129-166.score: 54.0
    ABSTRACT. May scientists rely on substantive, a priori presuppositions? Quinean naturalists say "no," but Michael Friedman and others claim that such a view cannot be squared with the actual history of science. To make his case, Friedman offers Newton's universal law of gravitation and Einstein's theory of relativity as examples of admired theories that both employ presuppositions (usually of a mathematical nature), presuppositions that do not face empirical evidence directly. In fact, Friedman claims that the use of such presuppositions is (...)
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  26. Guy Axtell (2001). Teaching James's “The Will to Believe”. Teaching Philosophy 24 (4):325-345.score: 54.0
    Many readers have viewed William James's "The Will to Believe" as his most distinctive and resonating lecture. Yet for all the scholarly attention it has received, the complexities of the "pragmatic defence," and the issues it raises concerning evidential and pragmatic reasoning are still often misunderstood. In this paper I explicate a neglected "core" argument tied closely to James's thesis statement, and provide charts and other tools useful in presenting James' lecture in the philosophy classroom. This argument, (...)
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  27. Thomas Natsoulas (2000). On the Intrinsic Nature of States of Consciousness: Further Considerations in the Light of James's Conception. Consciousness and Emotion 1 (1):139-166.score: 54.0
    How are the states of consciousness intrinsically so that they all qualify as ?feelings? in William James?s generic sense? Only a small, propaedeutic part of what is required to address the intrinsic nature of such states can be accomplished here. I restrict my topic mainly to a certain characteristic that belongs to each of those pulses of mentality that successively make up James?s stream of consciousness. Certain statements of James?s are intended to pick out the variable ?width? (...)
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  28. Bruce Wilshire (2009). William James's Pragmatism : A Distinctly Mixed Bag. In John J. Stuhr (ed.), 100 Years of Pragmatism: William James's Revolutionary Philosophy. Indiana University Press.score: 54.0
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  29. Brenda Jubin (1977). 'The Spatial Quale': A Corrective to James's Radical Empiricism. Journal of the History of Philosophy 15 (2):212-216.score: 54.0
    "Space," William James confessed, "is [both] a direfully difficult subject [and the] driest of subjects.'" Nonetheless, convinced that most previous accounts of space were either incoherent or mythological, he set out to describe space as it is actually experienced. His first effort, "The Spatial Quale," appeared in The Journal of Speculative Philosophy in 1879. 2 This article is historically important; as Ralph Barton Perry notes, "his peculiar view of the amplitude and eonnectedness of experience seems to have begun with (...)
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  30. Doug Anderson (2003). Respectability and the Wild Beasts of the Philosophical Desert: The Heart of James'S. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 17 (1):1-13.score: 54.0
    This commentary was suggested to me in part by a colleague's remark that it would be nice if we could make William James's The Varieties of Religious Experience "respectable." The implication was that though there was something redeemable about the book, it somehow wasn't philosophically or scientifically proper. The remark awakened me to—or at least reminded me of—the fact that this has been a traditional take on James's text. As Julius Bixler points out, ridicule began soon after the (...)
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  31. Horace Meyer Kallen (1937). Remarks on R. B. Perry's Portrait of William James. Philosophical Review 46 (1):68-78.score: 54.0
    Kallen's review of Ralph Barton Perry (1935) The Thought and Character of William James--in which he offers a pointed criticism.
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  32. Kenneth W. Stikkers (2009). Review of Sergio Franzese, The Ethics of Energy: William James's Moral Philosophy in Focus. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (5).score: 54.0
    Every scholar and reader of William James is aware of his frequent uses of "energy," especially in his discussions of ethics and most notably in his 1906 Presidential Address to the American Philosophical Association, "The Energies of Men".[1] But while other interpretations treat James's use of "energy" as merely one of his several folksy metaphors, The Ethics of Energy: William James's Moral Philosophy in Focus is the first monograph, as its author, Sergio Franzese, rightly claims, to focus (...)
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  33. Douglas R. Anderson (2004). Philosophy as Teaching: James's "Knight Errant," Thomas Davidson. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 18 (3):239-247.score: 54.0
    In 1905 William James wrote an essay in McClure's Magazine recalling the importance to his own work of the Scottish-born philosopher Thomas Davidson. In the essay, James states that Davidson was "essentially a teacher." What is interesting when one looks at Davidson's life and work is that, for Davidson, teaching does seem to be an essential feature of what it means to be a philosopher. Here, I develop how Davidson construes this linking of philosophy and teaching with a (...)
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  34. Dennis F. Thompson (1976). Bibliography: The Education of a Founding Father. The Reading List for John Witherspoon's Course in Political Theory, as Taken by James Madison. Political Theory 4 (4):523-529.score: 54.0
    ...Witherspoon's Course in Political Theory, as Taken by James Madison Dennis F. Thompson Princeton University [523...Witherspoon's Course in Political Theory, as Taken by James Madison. James Madison was an unusually wen-prepared student when, at eighteen...
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  35. John J. Stuhr (2009). Looking Toward Last Things : James's Pragmatism Beyond its First Century. In , 100 Years of Pragmatism: William James's Revolutionary Philosophy. Indiana University Press.score: 54.0
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  36. James S. Wilkie (1965). Harvey's Immediate Debt to Aristotle and to Galen. History of Science 4:103.score: 52.5
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  37. Sami Pihlström (2011). Eino Kaila on Pragmatism and Religion: An Introduction to Kaila's 1912 Essay on William James. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 47 (2):146-157.score: 51.0
    American pragmatism was, in the beginning of the twentieth century, a major movement not only in its home country but also in other parts of the globe as well, largely (but not exclusively) thanks to William James’s (1842–1910) international activity. In Europe, Italian and French philosophers, in particular, established their own pragmatist “schools,” and pragmatism also spread to the northern parts of the continent, including Germany and the Scandinavian countries. Even in the relatively remote Finland, Jamesian pragmatism rapidly became (...)
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  38. John R. Martin Jr (2006). C.L.R. James's Analysis of Race and Class. Radical Philosophy Review 9 (2):167-189.score: 51.0
    Social conditions of race and class continue to combine in ways that raise systemic questions about the adequacy and legitimacy of liberal, capitalist democracy in America. More radical alternatives, however, are still generally held to be irrelevant in the American context. The following is an effort to correct this widespread misrepresentation of socialism’s relevance to America generally, and to matters of race in particular. I consider the work of C.L.R. James who, fifty years ago, developed a class-oriented, explicitly Marxist (...)
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  39. Richard M. Gale (1997). William James's Semantics of "Truth". Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 33 (4):863 - 898.score: 51.0
    James's most original and important contribution was his moralizing of epistemology, in particular belief-acceptance and truth. We are always to believe in a way that maximizes desire-satisfaction, with a proposition counting as true when a belief in it maximizes desire-satisfaction. The theory of truth that falls out of James's pragmatic theory of meaning must be downgraded to a theory of when a proposition is epistemology warranted, thus the reason for the scare-quotation marks around "Truth" in the title of (...)
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  40. V. Denise James (2013). Reading Anna J. Cooper with William James: Black Feminist Visionary Pragmatism, Philosophy's Culture of Justification, and Belief. The Pluralist 8 (3):32-45.score: 51.0
    When William James spoke about belief to the philosophy clubs of Yale and Brown in 1896, he forewarned his audience of the nature of his comments by describing them as a “sermon on justification by faith” (James 13), titling the talk “The Will to Believe.” Although there is disagreement about the substance of James’s remarks, it is fairly innocuous to assert that James thought they were appropriate because of the prevalence of the “logical spirit” of many (...)
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  41. Christopher J. Broniak (1996). James's Theory of Fringes. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 32 (3):443 - 468.score: 51.0
    The purpose of this article is to present a more thoroughgoing account of what James means by the fringes of perceptual objects. The first section presents James's account of fringes of objects of consciousness within the context of his celebrated analogy of the stream of the fringe phenomenon for perception. It concludes by proposing a preliminary "working" definition of the concept "fringe": fringes are active bridges of associations (logical, psychological, etc.) from what is perceptually immediate but ambiguous to (...)
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  42. Michael D. Bybee (1984). James's Theory of Truth as a Theory of Knowledge. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 20 (3):253 - 267.score: 51.0
    The object of james's theory of truth is knowledge, not truth "qua" correctness. to designate the object of his theory, james avoids using traditional english terminology for correctness but often uses diction typically reserved for knowledge. furthermore, the object of james's theory (as he describes it) cannot be distinguished from knowledge on philosophical grounds.
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  43. E. Paul Colella (2013). Seeking the Center of Truth's Forest: William James in California, 1898. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 49 (3):348-370.score: 51.0
    “Philosophical Conceptions and Practical Results” has long been recognized for the special place that it occupies in the history of American philosophy. In it, American pragmatism enters into a wider, popular consciousness for the first time, acquiring both its name and its lineage. In the course of a brief hour with George Holmes Howison’s Philosophical Union at Berkeley in August of 1898, in a gymnasium before an audience of eight hundred people, pragmatism also acquires its living voice as William (...) introduces a new uniquely American philosophy based upon the innovative ideas of the then obscure Charles Peirce. After describing a new strategy for arriving at the meaning of an idea, he goes on to illustrate .. (shrink)
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  44. E. Paul Colella (2014). Seeking the Center of Truth's Forest: William James in California, 1898. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society: A Quarterly Journal in American Philosophy 49 (3):348-370.score: 51.0
    “Philosophical Conceptions and Practical Results” has long been recognized for the special place that it occupies in the history of American philosophy. In it, American pragmatism enters into a wider, popular consciousness for the first time, acquiring both its name and its lineage. In the course of a brief hour with George Holmes Howison’s Philosophical Union at Berkeley in August of 1898, in a gymnasium before an audience of eight hundred people, pragmatism also acquires its living voice as William (...) introduces a new uniquely American philosophy based upon the innovative ideas of the then obscure Charles Peirce. After describing a new strategy for arriving at the meaning of an idea, he goes on to illustrate .. (shrink)
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  45. Robert J. O'Connell (1992). The Will to Believe" and James's "Deontological Streak. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 28 (4):809 - 831.score: 51.0
    James's ethical thought could frequently be consequentialist, but it could also on occasion show a deontological side, or "streak," as I contended in "William James on the Courage to Believe". This shows up when he speaks of the "strenuous" as against the "easy-going" moral mood, in "The Moral Philosopher and the Moral Life," and it preserves the precursive intervention of our "passional natures" in "The Will to Believe" from lapsing into "wishful thinking." Toned down slightly, perhaps, in "Varieties (...)
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  46. Harvey S. James Jr (2006). Self-Selection Bias In Business Ethics Research. Business Ethics Quarterly 16 (4):559-578.score: 49.5
    Abstract: Suppose we want to know whether the ethics of persons with one characteristic differ from the ethics of persons having another characteristic. Self-selection bias occurs if people have control over that characteristic. When there is self-selection bias, we cannot be sure observed differences in ethics are correlated with the characteristic or are the result of individual self-selection. Self-selection bias is germane to many important business ethics questions. In this paper I explain what self-selection bias is, how it relates to (...)
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  47. Harvey S. James Jr (2003). On Finding Solutions to Ethical Problems in Agriculture. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 16 (5):439-457.score: 49.5
    A distinction should be made betweentwo types of ethical problems. A Type I ethicalproblem is one in which there is no consensusas to what is ethical. A Type II ethicalproblem is one in which there is a consensus asto what is ethical, but incentives exist forindividuals to behave unethically. Type Iethical problems are resolved by making,challenging, and reasoning through moralarguments. Type II ethical problems areresolved by changing the institutionalenvironment so that people do not haveincentives to behave unethically. Type Isolutions, however, (...)
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  48. Harvey S. James Jr (2012). Agriculture and Human Values. Agriculture and Human Values 29 (3):285-286.score: 49.5
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  49. Harvey S. James Jr (2013). Jayson Lusk: The Food Police: A Well-Fed Manifesto About the Politics of Your Plate. Agriculture and Human Values 30 (4):661-662.score: 49.5
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  50. Harvey S. James Jr (2006). Sustainable Agriculture and Free Market Economics: Finding Common Ground in Adam Smith. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 23 (4):427-438.score: 49.5
    There are two competing approaches to sustainability in agriculture. One stresses a strict economic approach in which market forces should guide the activities of agricultural producers. The other advocates the need to balance economic with environmental and social objectives, even to the point of reducing profitability. The writings of the eighteenth century moral philosopher Adam Smith could bridge the debate. Smith certainly promoted profit-seeking, private property, and free market exchange consistent with the strict economic perspective. However, his writings are also (...)
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