Search results for 'Helle Kieler' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. M. Hultman Christina, Mats Ann-Christin Lindgren, Jan Carlstedt-Duke G. Hansson, Ingemar Persson Martin Ritzen & Helle Kieler (2009). Ethical Issues in Cancer Register Follow-Up of Hormone Treatment in Adolescence. Public Health Ethics 2 (1).score: 540.0
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden Mats G. Hansson Uppsala University, Sweden Jan Carlstedt-Duke Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden Martin Ritzen Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden Ingemar Persson Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden Helle Kieler Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden * Corresponding author: Christina M. Hultman, Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Box 281, SE-171 77 Stockholm, Sweden. Tel.: +46 8 52483893; +46 70 3621031; Fax: +46 8 314975; Email: Christina.Hultman{at}ki.se ' + u + '@' + d + ' '//--> Abstract Since the 1970s, (...)
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  2. Christina M. Hultman, Ann-Christin Lindgren, Mats G. Hansson, Jan Carlstedt-Duke, Martin Ritzen, Ingemar Persson & Helle Kieler (2009). Ethical Issues in Cancer Register Follow-Up of Hormone Treatment in Adolescence. Public Health Ethics 2 (1):30-36.score: 240.0
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  3. C. M. Hultman, A. -C. Lindgren, M. G. Hansson, J. Carlstedt-Duke, M. Ritzen, I. Persson & H. Kieler (2009). Ethical Issues in Cancer Register Follow-Up of Hormone Treatment in Adolescence. Public Health Ethics 2 (1):30-36.score: 30.0
    Since the 1970s, estrogen have sometimes been used in adolescent girls to reduce very tall adult expected height. Worries about long-term effects have led to a proposal to link treatment data with cancer registers. How should one deal with informed consent for such a study? We designed a qualitative study with semi-structured telephone interviews. From 1200 women who were to be followed-up in cancer registers, we randomly selected 22 women. Major themes were a wish to be involved and a positive (...)
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  4. Horst J. Helle (1992). La formación de la persona entre la familia y la profesión. Anuario Filosófico 25 (2):389-402.score: 30.0
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  5. Horst Jürgen Helle (1975). Religionssoziologische Untersuchung der Spannungen zwischen Charisma und Institution. Archive for the Psychology of Religion 11 (1):209-221.score: 30.0
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  6. Ágnes Helle (2011). Autonomia sztuki czy godność dzieła sztuki? Kronos 2 (2).score: 30.0
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  7. Horst Jurgen Helle (1988). Epistemologia Ed Evoluzionismo in G. Simmel. Idee 7:25-40.score: 30.0
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  8. Horst Jürgen Helle (2010). Ohne Zukunft Keine Religion. In Jochen Bohn & Thomas Bohrmann (eds.), Religion Als Lebensmacht: Eine Festgabe für Gottfried Küenzlen. Evangelische Verlagsanstalt.score: 30.0
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  9. Ronnie Ellenblum (1993). Martin Rheinheimer, Das Kreuzfahrerfürstentum Galiläa.(Kieler Werkstücke, C/L.) Frankfurt Am Main: Peter Lang, 1990. Paper. Pp. Ix, 299; Black-and-White Illustration, 2 Tables, 4 Maps. $64.80. [REVIEW] Speculum 68 (4):1203-1204.score: 15.0
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  10. Nicholas A. Vonneuman (1971). Review: Stig Kanger, Helle Kanger, Rights and Parliamentarism. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 36 (1):183-183.score: 15.0
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  11. Martina Wenker (2013). Durfte der Kieler Ärztetag den ärztlich assistierten Suizid verbieten? Ja! Ethik in der Medizin 25 (1):73-77.score: 15.0
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  12. Urban Wiesing (2013). Durfte der Kieler Ärztetag den ärztlich assistierten Suizid verbieten? Nein! Ethik in der Medizin 25 (1):67-71.score: 15.0
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  13. Kaaren Grimstad (1998). Helle Degnbol Et Al., Eds., Ordbog Over Det Norrøne Prosasprog/A Dictionary of Old Norse Prose, 1: A–Bam. With Accompanying Spiralbound Key. Copenhagen: Arnamagnæanske Kommission, 1995. Pp. Viii, Cols. 906. Key: Pp. 122. DKr 250. [REVIEW] Speculum 73 (2):501-501.score: 15.0
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  14. Martin D. O'Keefe (1978). "Empedocles: A Philosophical Investigation," by Helle Lambridis. Modern Schoolman 55 (2):207-208.score: 15.0
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  15. Donald E. Queller (1991). Gerhard Rösch, Der venezianische Adel bis zur Schließung des Großen Rats: Zur Genese einer Führungsschicht.(Kieler historische Studien, 33.) Sigmaringen: Jan Thorbecke, 1989. Pp. 279. DM 54. [REVIEW] Speculum 66 (3):687-689.score: 15.0
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  16. Martin Cohen (2013). Little Black Book der Berühmten Gedankenspiele: Philosophische Rätsel Und Experimente für Helle Köpfe. Wiley-Vch.score: 15.0
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  17. Michael H. Gelting (2006). Knut Helle, Ed., The Cambridge History of Scandinavia, 1: Prehistory to 1520. Cambridge, Eng.: Cambridge University Press, 2003. Pp. Xx, 872 Plus 63 Black-and-White Plates; 7 Black-and-White Figures, Tables, and 15 Maps. $160. [REVIEW] Speculum 81 (2):526-529.score: 15.0
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  18. Rita Lenstrup (1991). Kritiske Bemærkninger Til Artikel Af Henning Bergenholtz, Helle Dam Og Torben Henriksen. Hermes 7:109-114.score: 15.0
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  19. Dr med Martina Wenker (2013). Durfte der Kieler Ärztetag den ärztlich assistierten Suizid verbieten? Ja! Ethik in der Medizin 25 (1):73-77.score: 15.0
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  20. Andrei A. Buckareff & Allen Plug (2013). Hell and the Problem of Evil. In Justin McBrayer & Daniel Howard-Snyder (eds.), Companion to the Problem of Evil. Wiley-Blackwell. 128-143.score: 8.0
    The case is discussed for the doctrine of hell as posing a unique problem of evil for adherents to the Abrahamic religions who endorse traditional theism. The problem is particularly acute for those who accept retributivist formulations of the doctrine of hell according to which hell is everlasting punishment for failing to satisfy some requirement. Alternatives to retributivism are discussed, including the unique difficulties that each one faces.
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  21. Gordon Knight (2010). Molinism and Hell. In Joel Buenting (ed.), The Problem of Hell. Ashgate.score: 8.0
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  22. Scott Aikin & Jason Aleksander (2014). All Philosophers Go to Hell: Dante and the Problem of Infernal Punishment. Sophia 53 (1):19-31.score: 8.0
    We discuss the philosophical problems attendant to the justice of eternal punishments in Hell, particularly those portrayed in Dante’s Inferno. We conclude that, under Dante’s description, a unique version of the problem of Hell (and Heaven) can be posed.
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  23. Gianluca Di Muzio (2013). Reincarnation and Infinite Punishment in Hell. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 74 (2):167-180.score: 8.0
    In the first part of the paper, I argue that Christians should incorporate the theory of reincarnation into their belief system. The problem of the apparent disproportion between finite human sin and infinite punishment in Hell becomes far more tractable against the background of reincarnation. In the second part of the paper, I address and answer three objections that may be raised against a Christian theory of reincarnation. The first objection is based on the role of memory in identity, the (...)
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  24. Matthew Konieczka (2011). Hell Despite Vagueness: A Response to Sider. Sophia 50 (1):221-232.score: 7.0
    Ted Sider argues that a binary afterlife is inconsistent with a proportionally just God because no just criterion for placing persons in such an afterlife exists. I provide a possible account whereby God can remain proportionally just and allow a binary afterlife. On my account, there is some maximum amount of people God can allow into Heaven without sacrificing some greater good. God gives to all people at least their due but chooses to allow some who do not deserve Heaven (...)
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  25. Nerina Rustomji (2008). The Garden and the Fire: Heaven and Hell in Islamic Culture. Columbia University Press.score: 7.0
    The garden, the fire, and Islamic origins -- Visions of the afterworld -- Material culture and an Islamic ethic -- Other worldly landscapes and earthly realities -- Humanity, servants, and companions -- Individualized gardens and expanding fires -- Legacy of gardens -- Epilogue.
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  26. Theodore Sider (2002). ``Hell and Vagueness&Quot. Faith and Philosophy 19 (1):58--68.score: 6.0
    A certain conception of Hell is inconsistent with God’s traditional attributes, or so I will argue. My argument is novel in focusing on considerations involving vagueness. The target doctrine of Hell is part of a “binary” conception of the afterlife, by which I mean one with the properties of dichotomy, badness, non-universality, and divine control. Dichotomy: there are exactly two states in the afterlife, Heaven and Hell. After death each person will come to be, determinately, in exactly one of these (...)
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  27. Andrei A. Buckareff & Allen Plug (2005). Escaping Hell: Divine Motivation and the Problem of Hell. Religious Studies 41 (1):39-54.score: 6.0
    We argue that it is most rational for God, given God's character and policies, to adopt an open-door policy towards those in hell – making it possible for those in hell to escape. We argue that such a policy towards the residents of hell should issue from God's character and motivational states. In particular, God's parental love ought to motivate God to extend the provision for reconciliation with Him for an infinite amount of time.
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  28. James Cain (2002). On the Problem of Hell. Religious Studies 38 (3):355-362.score: 6.0
    There is a conception of hell that holds that God punishes some people in a way that brings about endless suffering and unhappiness. An objection to this view holds that such punishment could not be just since it punishes finite sins with infinite suffering. In answer to this objection, it is shown that endless suffering, even intense suffering, is consistent with the suffering being finite. Another objection holds that such punishment is contrary to God's love. A possible response to this (...)
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  29. Kelly James Clark (2001). God is Great, God is Good: Medieval Conceptions of Divine Goodness and the Problem of Hell. Religious Studies 37 (1):15-31.score: 6.0
    Medieval views of both divine goodness and the doctrine of hell are examined and shown to be incompatible with our best understandings of goodness. The only manner in which God could be good to those in hell – by permitting their continued existence – is not sufficient to outweigh ‘the dreadful pains of eternal fire’. One might claim that God is good to them in the retributive sense; but I argue that retributive punishment is inadequate justification of eternal torment. The (...)
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  30. Raymond D. Bradley, "Can a Loving God Send People to Hell?" A Reply to William L. Craig.score: 6.0
    Some Christians do in fact think of the question euphemistically, like this. And some like to suppose, further, that when the children find that Hawaii is a bit like hell - it's far too hot and the locals are giving them a hard time - Father will relent and welcome them to his mansions on high.
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  31. John Lamont (2011). The Justice and Goodness of Hell. Faith and Philosophy 28 (2):152-173.score: 6.0
    The paper considers the objections to Christianity raised by David Lewis, which accuse Christians of immorality on the grounds of their worshipping a monstrous being who punishes finite evils by the infinite punishment of hell. It distinguishes between the objection that God is a monster because such punishment would be unjust, and the objection that even if damnation is just, God is a monster because he wills or allows the dreadful evil of hell by creating beings that can be justly (...)
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  32. Kenneth Einar Himma (2003). Eternally Incorrigible: The Continuing-Sin Response to the Proportionality Problem of Hell. Religious Studies 39 (1):61-78.score: 6.0
    According to the proportionality objection to hell, infinite suffering is out of proportion to any wrong that finite human beings could commit and is hence unjust and inconsistent with God's moral perfection. The continuing-sin response concedes that eternal consignment to hell is out of proportion to the sins people commit during their earthly lives, but argues that people in hell continue to sin while in hell and, in this way, extend their consignment to hell ad infinitum. In this essay, I (...)
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  33. Jerry L. Walls (2004). A Hell of a Choice: Reply to Talbott. Religious Studies 40 (2):203-216.score: 6.0
    In this article I respond to Thomas Talbott's criticisms of the view of hell I have defended. In particular, I argue that coherent sense can be made of the choice to be eternally separated from God. Moreover, Talbott does not successfully show how God can save everyone without overriding their freedom. Finally, I argue that there is no significant sense in which sinners defeat God or sin with impunity on the view I have defended. Talbott's case that universalism necessarily follows (...)
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  34. Anastasia Giannakidou & Marcel den Dikken, From Hell to Polarity: Aggressively Non-D-Linked Wh-Phrases as Polarity Items.score: 6.0
    Pesetsky’s (1987) ‘‘aggressively non-D-linked’’ wh-phrases (like who the hell; hereinafter, wh-the-hell phrases) exhibit a variety of syntactic and semantic peculiarities, including the fact that they cannot occur in situ and do not support nonecho readings when occurring in root multiple questions. While these are familiar from the literature (albeit less than fully understood), our focus will be on a previously unnoted property of wh-the-hell phrases: the fact that their distribution (in single wh-questions) matches that of polarity items (PIs). We lay (...)
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  35. Kyle Swan (2009). Hell and Divine Reasons for Action. Religious Studies 45 (1):51-61.score: 6.0
    Escapism, a theory of hell proposed by Andrei Buckareff and Allen Plug, explicitly relies on claims about divine reasons for action. However, they say surprisingly little about the general account of reasons for action that would justify the inferences in the argument for escapism. I provide a couple of plausible interpretations of such an account and argue that they help revive the ‘Job objection’ to escapism that Buckareff and Plug had dismissed.
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  36. Jonathan L. Kvanvig (1993). The Problem of Hell. New York: Oxford University Press.score: 6.0
    This work develops an understanding of hell that is common to a broad variety of religious perspectives, and argues that the usual understandings of hell are ...
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  37. Ted Poston & Trent Dougherty (2008). Hell and Vagueness: Reply to Sider. Faith and Philosophy 25 (3):322-328.score: 6.0
    Ted Sider’s paper “Hell and Vagueness” challenges a certain conception of Hell by arguing that it is inconsistent with God’s justice. Sider’s inconsistency argument works only when supplemented by additional premises. Key to Sider’s case is a premise that the properties upon which eternal destinies supervene are “a smear,” i.e. they are distributed continuously among individuals in the <span class='Hi'>world</span>. We question this premise and provide reasons to doubt it. The doubts come from two sources. The first is based on (...)
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  38. Charles Seymour (1997). On Choosing Hell. Religious Studies 33 (3):249-266.score: 6.0
    Most contemporary philosophers who defend the compatibility of hell with the divine goodness do so by arguing that the damned freely choose hell. Thomas Talbott denies that such a choice is possible, on the grounds that God in his goodness would remove any 'ignorance, deception, or bondage to desire' which would motivate a person to choose eternal misery. My strategy is to turn the tables on Talbott and ask why God would not remove the motives we have for any sin (...)
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  39. Wilko van Holten (1999). Hell and the Goodness of God. Religious Studies 35 (1):37-55.score: 6.0
    In this paper I contribute to the ongoing debate on hell in three ways: (1) I distinguish between three questions that play a key role in any discussion of the doctrine of hell; (2) I argue positively for the need of a doctrine of hell for Christian theism; (3) after evaluating several theological positions, I argue that the doctrine of hell should be construed as intrinsically bound up with the Christian conviction that God is love and wants to live with (...)
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  40. Charles Seymour (2000). A Craigian Theodicy of Hell. Faith and Philosophy 17 (1):103-115.score: 6.0
    Problem: if God has middle knowledge, he should actualize a world containing only persons whom he knows would freely choose heaven. Thus there should be no hell. Craig offers an answer to this problem in his article “ ‘No Other Name’: a Middle Knowledge Perspective on the Exclusivity of Salvation Through Christ.” Craig is mainly concerned to give a logically possible defense of hell, though he thinks his suggestion does not lack the sort of plausibility needed for a theodicy. I (...)
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  41. Trent Dougherty, Hell, Vagueness, and Justice: A Reply to Sider.score: 6.0
    Ted Sider’s paper “Hell and Vagueness” challenges a certain conception of Hell by arguing that it is inconsistent with God’s justice. Sider’s inconsistency argument works only when supplemented by additional premises. Key to Sider’s case is a premise that the properties upon which eternal destinies supervene are “a smear,” i.e., they are distributed continuously among individuals in the world. We question this premise and provide reasons to doubt it. The doubts come from two sources. The first is based on evidential (...)
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  42. Gabriel Peters (2011). The Social as Heaven and Hell: Pierre Bourdieu's Philosophical Anthropology. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 42 (1):63-86.score: 6.0
    Many authors have argued that all studies of socially specific modalities of human action and experience depend on some form of “philosophical anthropology”, i.e. on a set of general assumptions about what human beings are like, assumptions without which the very diagnoses of the cultural and historical variability of concrete agents' practices would become impossible. Bourdieu was sensitive to that argument and, especially in the later phase of his career, attempted to make explicit how his historical-sociological investigations presupposed and, at (...)
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  43. Michael Potts (1998). Aquinas, Hell, and the Resurrection of the Damned. Faith and Philosophy 15 (3):341-351.score: 6.0
    Based on themes in Aquinas, this paper adds to the defense of the doctrine of an eternal hell, focusing on the state of those in hell after the resurrection. I first summarize the Thomistic doctrine of the human person as a body-soul unity, showing why existence as a separated soul is truncated and unnatural. Next, I discuss the soul-body reunion at the resurrection, which restores an essential aspect of human nature, even for the damned. This reveals the love of God (...)
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  44. Ted Poston, Hell, Vagueness, and Justice: A Reply to Sider.score: 6.0
    Ted Sider’s paper “Hell and Vagueness” challenges a certain conception of Hell by arguing that it is inconsistent with God’s justice. Sider’s inconsistency argument works only when supplemented by additional premises. Key to Sider’s case is a premise that the properties upon which eternal destinies supervene are “a smear,” i.e., they are distributed continuously among individuals in the world. We question this premise and provide reasons to doubt it. The doubts come from two sources. The first is based on (...)
     
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  45. Martin Henry (2014). Does Hell Still Have a Future? Heythrop Journal 55 (6).score: 6.0
    The vexed and ever-controversial question of hell and the possibility of its final realization is the subject matter of this article. The current fading of belief, or at least serious interest, in this traditional aspect of Christian teaching is the starting-point for a brief historical survey of the meaning of the term in general and its meaning within Christianity in particular. The article argues for a retention of the doctrine, albeit shorn of some of its more flamboyant, traditional attributes, as (...)
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  46. Paul Kabay (2005). Is the Status Principle Beyond Salvation? Toward Redeeming an Unpopular Theory of Hell. Sophia 44 (1):91-103.score: 6.0
    In this paper I examine a recent objection to the retributive punishment theory of hell, specifically that the theory entails something obviously false: that it is possible to commit an infinite sin. I defend the moral principle behind one account of infinite sin, a principle referred to as the Status Principle (that other things being equal the higher the status of the offended the party, the more serious the sin). I show that recent objections to this principle are far from (...)
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  47. Ted Poston (2008). Hell, Vagueness, and Justice. Faith and Philosophy 25 (3):322-328.score: 6.0
    Ted Sider’s paper “Hell and Vagueness” challenges a certain conception of Hell by arguing that it is inconsistent with God’s justice. Sider’s inconsistencyargument works only when supplemented by additional premises. Key to Sider’s case is a premise that the properties upon which eternal destinies superveneare “a smear,” i.e., they are distributed continuously among individuals in the world. We question this premise and provide reasons to doubt it. The doubts come from two sources. The first is based on evidential considerations borrowed (...)
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  48. Stephen R. Munzer (2005). Self-Abandonment and Self-Denial Quietism, Calvinism, and the Prospect of Hell. Journal of Religious Ethics 33 (4):747-781.score: 6.0
    Self-abandonment and self-denial are, respectively, Catholic and hyper-Calvinist analogues of each other. Roughly, each requires the surrendering of a person to God's will and providence through faith, hope, and love. Should the self-abandoning/self-denying individual accept his or her own damnation if that be God's will? This article, which is virtually alone in discussing the Catholic and Reformed Protestant traditions together, answers "No." The unqualified self-abandonment present in quietism and the radical self-denial of Samuel Hopkins are perverse and irrational responses to (...)
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  49. Erik J. Olsson (2003). Avoiding Epistemic Hell: Levi on Pragmatism and Inconsistency. Synthese 135 (1):119 - 140.score: 6.0
    Isaac Levi has claimed that our reliance on the testimony of others, and on the testimony of the senses, commonly produces inconsistency in our set of full beliefs. This happens if what is reported is inconsistent with what we believe to be the case. Drawing on a conception of the role of beliefs in inquiry going back to Dewey, Levi has maintained that the inconsistent belief corpus is a state of ``epistemic hell'': it is useless as a basis for inquiry (...)
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