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Oliver A. Johnson [54]Mark Johnson [51]Ralph H. Johnson [46]Galen A. Johnson [38]
A. H. Johnson [37]Deborah G. Johnson [33]George Johnson [33]James Turner Johnson [29]

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Profile: Mark Johnson (East Carolina University)
Profile: Mark Johnson (University of Alabama, Birmingham)
Profile: Robert Johnson (University of Missouri, Columbia)
Profile: Galen A. Johnson (University of Rhode Island)
Profile: Paul Malcolm Johnson (University of Plymouth)
Profile: Peter Johnson
Profile: Peter Johnson
Profile: David Johnson (Metropolitan State University)
Profile: David Johnson (San Francisco State University)
Profile: David Johnson (University of Adelaide)
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  1. George Johnson, A Trip Back in Time and Space.
    Science Times cover story, July 10, 2007.
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  2. George Johnson, Alex Wanted a Cracker, but Did He Want One?
    Week in Review cover story, September 16, 2007.
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  3. George Johnson, Bright Scientists, Dim Notions.
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  4. George Johnson, Meta Physicists (a Review of “Faust in Copenhagen” by Gino Segre).
    New York Times Book Review, June 24, 2007.
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  5. George Johnson, Sleights of Mind.
    Science Times cover story, August 21, 2007.
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  6. Kyle Johnson, Determiners,.
    talk presented at On Linguistic Interfaces, Ulster, June 2007.
     
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  7. Kyle Johnson, LCA+Alignment=RNR,.
    talk presented at the Workshop on Coordination, Subordination and Ellipsis, Tubingen, June 2007.
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  8. Keith Anderson, Katherine Woods, William Alexander, Julian Ingram & Mark Johnson, Characters of the Dialogue.
    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 RECORDER'S PREFACE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (...)
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  9. David Atkinson & Porter Johnson, Nonconservation of Energy and Loss of Determinism.
    An infinite number of elastically colliding balls is considered in a classical, and then in a relativistic setting. Energy and momentum are not necessarily conserved globally, even though each collision does separately conserve them. This result holds in particular when the total mass of all the balls is finite, and even when the spatial extent and temporal duration of the process are also finite. Further, the process is shown to be indeterministic: there is an arbitrary parameter in the general solution (...)
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  10. Sigrid Beck & Kyle Johnson, Double Objects Again.
    (1) a. Satoshi sent Thilo the Schw¨abische W¨orterbuch. b. Satoshi sent the Schw¨abische W¨orterbuch to Thilo. Many have entertained the notion that there is a rule that relates sentences such as these. This is suggested by the fact that it is possible to learn that a newly coined verb licenses one of them and automatically know that it licenses the other. Marantz (1984) argues for the existence of such a rule in this way, noting that once one has learned of (...)
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  11. David Martel Johnson & Joseph Agassi, Summary and Conclusions.
    As a new field, cognitivism began with the total rejection of the old, traditional views of language acquisition and of learning ─ individual and collective alike. Chomsky was one of the pioneers in this respect, yet he clouds issues by excessive claims for his originality and by not allowing the beginner in the art of the acquisition of language the use of learning by making hypotheses and testing them, though he acknowledges that researchers, himself included, do use this method. The (...)
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  12. George Johnson, Bright Air, Brilliant Fire.
    ACCORDING to one of the weirder interpretations of quantum theory, electrons and the other subatomic particles that make up creation don't really come into existence -- taking on definite positions in time and space -- until they are beheld by a conscious observer. Extending this notion to a cosmic scale, the most radical proponents of what has come to be called the anthropic cosmological principle argue for a dizzying symbiosis in which the universe gives rise to conscious beings who in (...)
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  13. George Johnson, Consciousness Explained.
    Wielding his philosophical razor, William of Ockham declared, in the early 14th century, that in slicing the world into categories, thou shalt not multiply entities needlessly. He might have been pleased when, half a millennium later, James Clerk Maxwell helped tidy things up by writing the equations that show magnetism and electricity as perpendicular shadows cast by light beams, radio waves, X-rays and other forms of what we now call electromagnetic radiation. Einstein did Maxwell one better (...)
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  14. George Johnson, Fire in the Mind.
    "The only laws of matter are those which our minds must fabricate, and the only laws of mind are fabricated for it by matter." -- James Clerk Maxwell..
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  15. George Johnson, Indian Tribes' Creationists Thwart Archeologists.
    Dr. Robson Bonnichsen, director of the Center for the Study of the First Americans at Oregon State University in Corvallis, was excavating a 10,000-year-old archeological site in southwestern Montana several years ago when his team discovered that the area was littered with ancient human hairs. The archeologists realized with some excitement that the hairs' DNA content could be studied for clues about the origins of the prehistoric people who once lived there.
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  16. George Johnson, On the Internet, Hysteria Over Heaven's Gate.
    FOR the techno-libertarians intent on keeping the abstract duchy called cyberspace the freest of all lands, the last few months have been a nightmare of bad vibrations rippling through what the electronic elite derisively calls the "old media.".
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  17. George Johnson, Scholars Debate Roots of Yiddish, Migration of Jews.
    TRYING to trace the ancient roots of a modern language is always a maddeningly ambiguous and uncertain enterprise. With Yiddish, the language of the Ashkenazic Jews of Central and Eastern Europe, the task is even harder because of the horrifying fact that most of the speakers were exterminated in the Holocaust.
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  18. George Johnson, Social Strife May Have Exiled Ancient Indians.
    UNTIL very recently, the most perplexing mystery of Southwestern archeology -- what caused the collapse of the ancient empire of the Anasazi -- seemed all but solved. Careful scrutiny of tree-ring records seemed to establish that in the late 1200's a prolonged dry spell called the Great Drought drove these people, the ancestors of today's pueblo Indians, to abandon their magnificent stone villages at Mesa Verde and elsewhere on the Colorado Plateau, never to return again.
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  19. George Johnson, The Books in the Basement.
    Early in my college career, I was perusing the science section of my favorite bookstore in Albuquerque—the Living Batch, where the really smart hippies hung out—when my eye was caught by the spine of a little paperback called The Universe and Dr. Einstein. Priced at ninetyfive cents, it promised to be “the clearest, most readable book on Einstein’s theories ever published.” On the cover was a tantalizing portrait of a well-tanned Einstein, his wild shock of hair blowing in the (...)
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  20. George Johnson, The Jaguar and the Fox.
    ALONG the far wall of the spacious, newly renovated bookstore at the California Institute of Technology, in Pasadena, stands a shrine to Richard Feynman, the university's celebrity scientist. Reaching from floor to ceiling, shelf upon shelf is loaded with multiple copies of more than fifty Feynman hits -- books, CDs, cassettes, and videotapes capturing the outpouring of words written about or uttered by the man many consider to be the greatest physicist of the second half..
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  21. George Johnson, The Physics of Immortality.
    EVEN more than the separation of church and state, the separation between church and laboratory is supposed to be absolute. Science is to concentrate on describing how the universe works, leaving questions of who or what created it and why it exists to the dens of the metaphysicians. Once they agree to play by these rules, scientists the world over can worship different gods while contemplating the same equations.
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  22. George Johnson, Worshipping in the Church of Einstein or How I Found Fischbeck's Rule.
    As he headed into the last years of his life, Albert Einstein thought he had been given a bad rap. Admittedly he had spoken rather loosely in the past. "I can't believe that God plays dice with the universe," he once exclaimed, expressing his exasperation at the reprehensible randomness of quantum mechanics. And when he had wanted to convey his conviction that the laws of nature, though sometimes obscure, are orderly and understandable by the human mind, he put it like (...)
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  23. Kyle Johnson, Clausal Edges and Their Effects on Scope.
    Clausal edges seem to have an effect on the scopes that arguments residing at those edges can have. In particular, they influence whether an argument may be interpreted at a lowered, or reconstructed, position within the clause. This is probably what is responsible for the difference between (1a) and (1b), which formed the focus for the debate in Stowell 1991 and Williams..
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  24. Kyle Johnson, Few Dogs Eat Whiskas or Cats Alpo.
    One of the interests in the Gapping construction is the headache it causes for those trying to get constituency structure right. On the assumption that Gapping, like other processes of sentence grammar, respects constituency, it is very hard to deliver the right constituents in cases such as (1). (1) a. Some consider him honest and others consider him pleasant. b. The faculty brought scotch to the party and the students brought beer to the party. c. The girls occasionally ate peanuts (...)
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  25. Kyle Johnson, How to Be Quiet.
    One job of the ellipsis theorist is to characterize the connection between the syntax of ellipsis and its semantics. And a central goal of that task is to explain where it is that ellipses are possible. The most thorough examination of what’s involved in meeting this goal is probably Lobeck (1995), where it is proposed that heads with certain properties license the ellipsis of their complements. Merchant (2001, section 2.2.1) amends this proposal with an explicit characterization of the semantics of (...)
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  26. Kyle Johnson, Pronouns Vs. Definite Descriptions.
    This paper looks at an approach to Principle C in which the disjoint reference effect triggered by definite description arises because there is a preference for using bound pronouns in those cases. Philippe Schlenker has linked this approach to the idea that the NP part of a definite description should be the most minimal in content relative to a certain communicative goal. On a popular view about what the syntax and semantics of a personal pronoun is, that should have the (...)
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  27. Kyle Johnson, Towards an Etiology of Adjunct Islands.
    In one approach to classifying island phenomena, there is a group that answers to the following description. (1) ADJUNCT ISLAND CONDITION If an XP is in an adjunct position, nothing may move out of it. In the influential approach to this condition in Huang (1982), “adjunct” position is defined in terms that reference argument structure and its reflection in phrasemarker geometry. This definition groups together subject phrases and modifying phrases, contrasting them with phrases in “complement” position. The subsequent bounding theories (...)
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  28. Kyle Johnson, Why Movement?
    There is a certain set of locality conditions that seem to hold just of movement operations. Some of the islands described in Ross (1967) appear to be of this kind.
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  29. Mark H. Johnson & Leslie A. Tucker, The Emergence of the Social Brain Network: Evidence From Typical and Atypical Development.
    Several research groups have identified a network of regions of the adult cortex that are activated during social perception and cognition tasks. In this paper we focus on the development of components of this social brain network during early childhood and test aspects of a particular viewpoint on human functional brain development: “interactive specialization.” Specifically, we apply new data analysis techniques to a previously published data set of event-related potential ~ERP! studies involving 3-, 4-, and 12-month-old infants viewing faces of (...)
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  30. Mark L. Johnson, Cause and Effect Theories of Attention: The Role of Conceptual Metaphors.
    Scientific concepts are defined by metaphors. These metaphors determine what attention is and what count as adequate explanations of the phenomenon. The authors analyze these metaphors within 3 types of attention theories: (a) “cause” theories, in which attention is presumed to modulate information processing (e.g., attention as a spotlight; attention as a limited resource); (b) “effect” theories, in which attention is considered to be a by-product of information processing (e.g., the competition metaphor); and (c) hybrid theories that combine cause and (...)
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  31. Paul Johnson, G.W.F. Hegel (1770-1831).
    God alone is the true agreement of concept [Begriff ] and reality [Realität ]; all finite [endlichen] things involve some untruth [Unwahrheit], they have a concept and an existence [Existenz] which are incommensurable [unangemessen]. For this reason they inevitably go to ruin [zugrunde gehen], that the incommensurability [Unangemessenheit] of their concept and their existence may be evident [manifestiert]. The animal, as an individual, has its concept in the species [Gattung]; and its death [Tod] sets the species free from individuality [Einzelnheit]. (...)
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  32. Paul Johnson, Ludwig Wittgenstein (1889-1951).
    A year before, at Trinity, Cambridge, Wittgenstein had been involved in a row with Karl Popper, and had reputedly threatened him with a poker. On this evening, too, Wittgenstein's behavior let [sic] to a row, with an elderly philosophy don. No poker was flourished. But the don dropped dead a few days later.
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  33. Robert Johnson, Moral Indifference.
    opposed ways. 6:408-9 Understood as "moral apathy", to be indifferent is to be uninfluenced..
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  34. Roderick Long & Charles Johnson, Libertarian Feminism: Can This Marriage Be Saved?
    An earlier, abbreviated version was presented as remarks for the inaugural symposium of the Molinari Society, at the American Philosophical Association Eastern Division meeting, on 27 December 2004. Replies and comments on matters of style, content, and argument in this essay are welcome.
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  35. P. Cole & D. Johnson, The Self as a Center of Narrative Gravity.
    This is a well-behaved concept in Newtonian physics. But a center of gravity is not an atom or a subatomic particle or any other physical item in the world. It has no mass; it has no color; it has no physical properties at all, except for spatio-temporal location. It is a fine example of what Hans Reichenbach would call an abstractum. It is a purely abstract object. It is, if you like , a theorist's fiction. It is not one of (...)
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  36. D. S. Hutchinson & Monte Ransome Johnson, The Antidosis of Isocrates and Aristotle's Protrepticus.
    Isocrates' Antidosis ("Defense against the Exchange") and Aristotle's Protrepticus ("Exhortation to Philosophy") were recovered from oblivion in the late nineteenth century. In this article we demonstrate that the two texts happen to be directly related. Aristotle's Protrepticus was a response, on behalf of the Academy, to Isocrates' criticism of the Academy and its theoretical preoccupations. -/- Contents: I. Introduction: Protrepticus, text and context II. Authentication of the Protrepticus of Aristotle III. Isocrates and philosophy in Athens in the 4th century IV. (...)
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  37. Dr Paul Johnson, The 3rd World Conference on Buddhism and Science (WCBS).
    Modern (western) healthcare with its many remarkable innovations has failed to prevent either the pandemic of life style-related diseases now accounting for over 2/3rd of illness and healthcare cost globally, or cure them. Most are preventable and reversible with a change in lifestyle. Since less than 3% of western healthcare budgets are spent on health promotion and disease prevention this is unlikely to change. What little health promotion there is focuses on diet and exercise with the mind neglected except recently (...)
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  38. George Johnson, Building a Cosmic Tape Measure.
    hroughout the century, scientists have had to rely on maddeningly oblique methods, laden with assumptions, for measuring the size of the universe. They've had to guess, from purely theoretical considerations, how bright a star or galaxy really is. Then from its apparent brightness, dimmed by the journey of the light through space, they judge its distance.
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  39. George Johnson, Copyright 1992 the New York Times Company the New York Times April 19, 1992, Sunday, Late Edition - Final Section 7; Page 2; Column 1; Book Review Desk 2265 Words Evolution Between the Ears. [REVIEW]
    ACCORDING to one of the weirder interpretations of quantum theory, electrons and the other subatomic particles that make up creation don't really come into existence -- taking on definite positions in time and space -- until they are beheld by a conscious observer. Extending this notion to a cosmic scale, the most radical proponents of what has come to be called the anthropic cosmological principle argue for a dizzying symbiosis in which the universe gives rise to conscious beings who in (...)
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  40. George Johnson, Copyright 1994 the New York Times Company the New York Times October 9, 1994, Sunday, Late Edition - Final Section 7; Page 15; Column 1; Book Review Desk 2058 Words the Odds on God. [REVIEW]
    EVEN more than the separation of church and state, the separation between church and laboratory is supposed to be absolute. Science is to concentrate on describing how the universe works, leaving questions of who or what created it and why it exists to the dens of the metaphysicians. Once they agree to play by these rules, scientists the world over can worship different gods while contemplating the same equations.
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  41. George Johnson, Dark Matter Lights the Void.
    MANY moons from now, when extraterrestrial archeologists sift through the records of our brief civilization, they might be amused to stumble across the proceedings of an annual convention of stargazers called the American Astronomical Society. They would be right in concluding that 1996 was, in one way or another, a landmark year.
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  42. George Johnson, How Memories Are Made.
    Scientists have long believed that constructing memories is like playing with neurological Tinkertoys. Exposed to a barrage of sensations from the outside world, we snap together brain cells to form new circuitry-patterns of electrical connections that stand for images, smells, touches and sounds.
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  43. George Johnson, On the Trail of the Illuminati: A Journalist's Search for the “Conspiracy That Rules the World".
    Many readers encounter the history and mythology of the Illuminati for the first time in the course of reading Angels & Demons. They typically wonder if the Illuminati is a real organization in history and, if so, how much of Dan Brown’s description is accurate. To help answer that question, we turned to George Johnson, the well-known New York Times science writer. Johnson shares several interests with Dan Brown and fans of Angels & Demons: He has written extensively about the (...)
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  44. George Johnson, Pierre, is That a Masonic Flag on the Moon?
    Without so much as an America Online account, Timothy Dwight, president of Yale University two centuries ago, learned of an evil plot -- hatched in France by Freemasons hopped up on Enlightenment philosophy -- to overthrow the United States Government. A Bavarian secret society called the Order of the Illuminati was also involved. Unable to access alt.conspiracy or even a good E-mail program, Dwight had to resort to public speaking to spread the word.
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  45. George Johnson, Physical Laws Collide in a Black Hole Bet.
    o an outsider, nothing might seem more ridiculous than the spectacle of grown men and women sitting around a conference table soberly discussing what would happen if a volume of the Encyclopedia Britannica were dropped down a black hole. Yet this very question lies at the heart of the "information paradox," a seeming contradiction to the laws of physics that is causing scientists to re-examine some of their most basic assumptions about how the universe is made.
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  46. George Johnson, To Test a Powerful Computer, Play an Ancient Game.
    While there are avid chess players in Japan, China, Korea and throughout the East, far more popular is the deceptively simple game of Go, in which black and white pieces called stones are used to form intricate, interlocking patterns that sprawl across the board. So subtle and beautiful is this ancient game that, to hear aficionados describe it, Go is to chess what Asian martial arts like aikido are to a boxing match.
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  47. George Johnson, Undiscovered Bach? No, a Computer Wrote It.
    n a low-key, musical version of the match between Garry Kasparov and the chess-playing machine called Deep Blue, a musician at the University of Oregon competed last month with a computer to compose music in the style of Johann Sebastian Bach. Dr. Steve Larson, who teaches music theory at the university, listened anxiously while his wife, the pianist Winifred Kerner, performed three entries in the contest -- one by Bach, one by Larson and one by a computer program called EMI, (...)
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  48. George Johnson, War of the Worlds.
    The daddy longlegs clinging vertically to my bathroom wall is a marvel of airy symmetry, its tiny head perched delicately at the center of eight arching limbs. A moment later, struck by the back of my hand, it lies crumpled on the floor. I’m sorry, but I don’t like spiders in the house.
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  49. George Johnson, Wanted: The Meaning of Life.
    The grandest unification theory of them all got its start in 1948, when two remarkable publications appeared. Claude Shannon's paper ''A Symbolic Analysis of Relay and Switching Circuits" and Norbert Wiener's book ''Cybernetics'' brought to the world's attention an idea that had been bubbling beneath the surface for years: information, like matter and energy, can be considered a thing in itself -- a fundamental building block of reality. Ever since, there has been a growing effort to explain the brain, the (...)
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  50. Kent Johnson, Externalist Thoughts and the Scope of Linguistics.
    A common assumption in metaphysics and the philosophy of language is that the general structure of language displays the general metaphysical structure of the things we talk about. But expressions can easily be imperfect representations of what they are about. After clarifying this general point, I make a case study of a recent attempt to semantically analyze the nature of knowledge-how. This attempt fails because there appears to be no plausible bridge from the linguistic structure of knowledge-how reports to knowledge-how (...)
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