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Henry W. Johnstone [66]Henry W. Johnstone Jr [29]Albert A. Johnstone [16]Jas Johnstone [16]
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Profile: Albert Arnold Johnstone (University of Oregon)
Profile: Mark Johnstone (McMaster University)
Profile: Dougie Johnstone (University of Leicester)
Profile: Hugh Johnstone (University of Melbourne)
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Profile: Justine Johnstone (University of Sussex)
Profile: Jessica Johnstone (Wilfrid Laurier University)
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Profile: Lyn Johnstone (Royal Holloway University of London)
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  1. Mark A. Johnstone (2014). On 'Logos' in Heraclitus. Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 47:1-29.
    In this paper, I offer a new solution to the old problem of how best to understand the meaning of the word ‘logos’ in the extant writings of Heraclitus, especially in fragments DK B1, B2 and B50. On the view I defend, Heraclitus was neither using the word in a perfectly ordinary way in these fragments, as some have maintained, nor denoting by it some kind of general principle or law governing change in the cosmos, as many have claimed. Rather, (...)
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  2. Mark A. Johnstone (2013). Aristotle on Sounds. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 21 (5):631-48.
    In this paper I consider two related issues raised by Aristotle 's treatment of hearing and sounds. The first concerns the kinds of changes Aristotle takes to occur, in both perceptual medium and sense organs, when a perceiver hears a sounding object. The second issue concerns Aristotle 's views on the nature and location of the proper objects of auditory perception. I argue that Aristotle 's views on these topics are not what they have sometimes been taken to be, and (...)
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  3. Mark A. Johnstone (2012). Aristotle on Odour and Smell. Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 43:143-83.
    The sense of smell occupies a peculiar intermediate position within Aristotle's theory of sense perception: odours, like colours and sounds, are perceived at a distance through an external medium of air or water; yet in their nature they are intimately related to flavours, the proper objects of taste, which for Aristotle is a form of touch. In this paper, I examine Aristotle's claims about odour and smell, especially in De Anima II.9 and De Sensu 5, to see what light they (...)
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  4. Henry W. Johnstone Jr (1954). Cause, Implication, and Dialectic. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 14 (3):400-404.
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  5. Mark A. Johnstone (2013). Anarchic Souls: Plato's Depiction of the Democratic Man. Phronesis 58 (2):139-59.
    In books 8 and 9 of Plato’s Republic, Socrates provides a detailed account of the nature and origins of four main kinds of vice found in political constitutions and in the kinds of people that correspond to them. The third of the four corrupt kinds of person he describes is the ‘democratic man’. In this paper, I ask what ‘rules’ in the democratic man’s soul. It is commonly thought that his soul is ruled in some way by its appetitive part, (...)
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  6.  86
    William Johnstone (forthcoming). Book Review: First and Second Chronicles. [REVIEW] Interpretation 58 (2):206-206.
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  7.  28
    Albert A. Johnstone (2012). The Deep Bodily Roots of Emotion. Husserl Studies 28 (3):179-200.
    This article explores emotions and their relationship to ‘somatic responses’, i.e., one’s automatic responses to sensations of pain, cold, warmth, sudden intensity. To this end, it undertakes a Husserlian phenomenological analysis of the first-hand experience of eight basic emotions, briefly exploring their essential aspects: their holistic nature, their identifying dynamic transformation of the lived body, their two-layered intentionality, their involuntary initiation and voluntary espousal. The fact that the involuntary tensional shifts initiating emotions are irreplicatable voluntarily, is taken to show that (...)
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  8. Gerry Johnstone (2002). Restorative Justice: Ideas, Values, Debates. Willan Pub..
    Machine generated contents note: 1 Introduction 1 -- 2 Central themes and critical issues 10 -- Introduction 10 -- Core themes 11 -- Differences which have surfaced in the move from -- margins to mainstream 15 -- The claims of restorative justice: a brief examination 21 -- Some limitations of restorative justice 25 -- Some dangers of restorative justice 29 -- Debunking restorative justice 32 -- 3 Reviving restorative justice traditions 36 -- The rebirth of an ancient practice 36 -- (...)
     
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  9.  23
    Justine Johnstone (2007). Technology as Empowerment: A Capability Approach to Computer Ethics. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 9 (1):73-87.
    Standard agent and action-based approaches in computer ethics tend to have difficulty dealing with complex systems-level issues such as the digital divide and globalisation. This paper argues for a value-based agenda to complement traditional approaches in computer ethics, and that one value-based approach well-suited to technological domains can be found in capability theory. Capability approaches have recently become influential in a number of fields with an ethical or policy dimension, but have not so far been applied in computer ethics. The (...)
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  10.  21
    Mark A. Johnstone (2015). Aristotle on Perceiving Objects, by Anna Marmodoro. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 201501.
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  11. Mark A. Johnstone (2011). Changing Rulers in the Soul: Psychological Transitions in Republic 8-9. Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 41:139-67.
    In this paper, I consider how each of the four main kinds of corrupt person described in Plato's Republic, Books 8-9, first comes to be. Certain passages in these books can give the impression that each person is able to determine, by a kind of rational choice, the overall government of his/her soul. However, I argue, this impression is mistaken. Upon careful examination, the text of books 8 and 9 overwhelmingly supports an alternative interpretation. According to this view, the (...)
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  12.  31
    Megan-Jane Johnstone (2011). Nursing and Justice as a Basic Human Need. Nursing Philosophy 12 (1):34-44.
  13. Albert A. Johnstone (2002). The Liar Syndrome. SATS: Northern European Journal of Philosophy 3 (1):37-55.
    This article examines the various Liar paradoxes and their near kin, Grelling’s paradox and Gödel’s Incompleteness Theorem with its self-referential Gödel sentence. It finds the family of paradoxes to be generated by circular definition–whether of statements, predicates, or sentences–a manoeuvre that generates the fatal disorders of the Liar syndrome: semantic vacuity, semantic incoherence, and predicative catalepsy. Afflicted statements, such as the self-referential Liar statement, fail to be genuine statements. Hence they say nothing, a point that invalidates the reasoning on which (...)
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  14.  38
    Joel David Hamkins & Thomas A. Johnstone (2010). Indestructible Strong Unfoldability. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 51 (3):291-321.
    Using the lottery preparation, we prove that any strongly unfoldable cardinal $\kappa$ can be made indestructible by all.
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  15.  6
    M. -J. Johnstone & A. Hutchinson (2015). 'Moral Distress' - Time to Abandon a Flawed Nursing Construct? Nursing Ethics 22 (1):5-14.
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  16.  11
    Mark A. Johnstone (2015). The Powers of Aristotle’s Soul, by Thomas Kjeller Johansen. [REVIEW] Mind (496):doi: 10.1093/mind/fzv082.
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  17. B. V. Johnstone (1992). Book Review : Reading in Communion: Scriptureand Ethics in Christian Life, by Stephen E. Fowl and L. Gregory Jones. London, SPCK,1991. 166 Pp. 12.95. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 5 (2):86-88.
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  18.  54
    Albert A. Johnstone (1999). The Relevance of Nonsymbolic Cognition to Husserl's Fifth Meditation. Philosophy Today 43 (supplement):88-98.
  19.  5
    Albert A. Johnstone (2013). Why Emotion? Journal of Consciousness Studies 20 (9-10):15-38.
    The various roles proposed for emotion, whether psychological such as preparing for action or serving prior concerns, or biological such as protecting and promoting well-being, are easily shown to have an awkward number of exceptions. This paper attempts to explain why. To this end it undertakes a Husserlian phenomenological examination of first-person experience of two types of responses, the various somatic responses elicited by sensations (pain, cold, pleasure, sudden intensity) and the various personal directed emotions (grief, fear, affection, joy). The (...)
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  20.  11
    Carien van Reekum, Tom Johnstone, Rainer Banse, Alexandre Etter, Thomas Wehrle & Klaus Scherer (2004). Psychophysiological Responses to Appraisal Dimensions in a Computer Game. Cognition and Emotion 18 (5):663-688.
  21.  2
    Mark A. Johnstone (2015). The Powers of Aristotle’s Soul, by Thomas Kjeller Johansen. Mind 124 (496):1303-1305.
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  22.  1
    Steven Johnstone (2011). A History of Trust in Ancient Greece. University of Chicago Press.
    In providing the first comprehensive account of these pervasive and crucial systems, A History of Trust in Ancient Greece links Greek political, economic, social, and intellectual history in new ways and challenges contemporary analyses of ...
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  23.  92
    Henry W. Johnstone Jr (1955). The Logical Powerfulness of Philosophical Arguments. Mind 64 (256):539-541.
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  24.  15
    M. -J. Johnstone (2012). Bioethics, Cultural Differences and the Problem of Moral Disagreements in End-Of-Life Care: A Terror Management Theory. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 37 (2):181-200.
    Next SectionCultural differences in end-of-life care and the moral disagreements these sometimes give rise to have been well documented. Even so, cultural considerations relevant to end-of-life care remain poorly understood, poorly guided, and poorly resourced in health care domains. Although there has been a strong emphasis in recent years on making policy commitments to patient-centred care and respecting patient choices, persons whose minority cultural worldviews do not fit with the worldviews supported by the conventional principles of western bioethics face a (...)
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  25.  14
    Mark A. Johnstone (2015). Aristotle and Alexander on Perceptual Error. Phronesis: A Journal for Ancient Philosophy 60 (3):310-338.
    Aristotle sometimes claims that the perception of special perceptibles by their proper sense is unerring. This claim is striking, since it might seem that we quite often misperceive things like colours, sounds and smells. Aristotle also claims that the perception of common perceptibles is more prone to error than the perception of special perceptibles. This is puzzling in its own right, and also places constraints on the interpretation of. I argue that reading Alexander of Aphrodisias on perceptual error can (...)
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  26.  37
    Albert A. Johnstone (2002). Doctor's Diagnosis Sustained. SATS: Northern European Journal of Philosophy 3 (2):142-153.
    This article is a sequel to ‘The Liar Syndrome’. It answers in detail the various criticisms of the latter expressed by Roy T. Cook in his article, ‘Curing the Liar Syndrome’, appearing in SATS/Nordic Journal of Philosophy, 3 (2): 126-141 (2002).
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  27.  1
    Megan-Jane Johnstone (2012). Academic Freedom and the Obligation to Ensure Morally Responsible Scholarship in Nursing. Nursing Inquiry 19 (2):107-115.
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  28.  6
    Henry W. Johnstone (1996). The Rejection of Infinite Postponement as a Philosophical Argument. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 10 (2):92 - 104.
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  29.  16
    Mark A. Johnstone (2015). Tyrannized Souls: Plato's Depiction of the ‘Tyrannical Man’. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 23 (3):423-437.
    In book 9 of Plato's Republic, Socrates describes the nature and origins of the ‘tyrannical man’, whose soul is said to be ‘like’ a tyrannical city. In this paper, I examine the nature of the ‘government’ that exists within the tyrannical man's soul. I begin by demonstrating the inadequacy of three potentially attractive views sometimes found in the literature on Plato: the view that the tyrannical man's soul is ruled by his ‘lawless’ unnecessary appetites, the view that it is ruled (...)
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  30.  4
    Thomas A. Johnstone (2008). Strongly Unfoldable Cardinals Made Indestructible. Journal of Symbolic Logic 73 (4):1215-1248.
    I provide indestructibility results for large cardinals consistent with V = L, such as weakly compact, indescribable and strongly unfoldable cardinals. The Main Theorem shows that any strongly unfoldable cardinal κ can be made indestructible by <κ-closed. κ-proper forcing. This class of posets includes for instance all <κ-closed posets that are either κ -c.c, or ≤κ-strategically closed as well as finite iterations of such posets. Since strongly unfoldable cardinals strengthen both indescribable and weakly compact cardinals, the Main Theorem therefore makes (...)
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  31. Gerry Johnstone & Daniel Van Ness (2007). The Meaning of Restorative Justice. In Gerry Johnstone & Daniel W. van Ness (eds.), Handbook of Restorative Justice.
     
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  32.  33
    Henry W. Johnstone (1996). Locke and Whately on the Argumentum Ad Hominem. Argumentation 10 (1):89-97.
    This is an exploration of what Locke and Whately said about the Argumentatum ad Hominem, especially in the context of what they said about the other ad arguments, and with a view to ascertaining whether what they said lends support to the understanding of this argument implicit in Johnstone's thesis that all valid philosophical arguments are ad hominem. It is concluded that this support is forthcoming insofar as Locke and Whately had in mind an argument concerned with principles.The essay ends (...)
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  33.  4
    Albert A. Johnstone (2011). The Basic Self and Its Doubles. Journal of Consciousness Studies 18 (7-8):169-195.
    As Descartes noted, a proper account of the nature of the being one is begins with a basic self present in first-person experience, a self that one cannot cogently doubt being. This paper seeks to uncover such a self, first within consciousness and thinking, then within the lived or first-person felt body. After noting the lack of grounding of Merleau-Ponty’s commonly referenced reflections, it undertakes a phenomenological investigation of the body that finds the basic self to reside in one’s espoused (...)
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  34.  5
    Albert A. Johnstone (2002). The Liar Syndrome. SATS 3 (1).
    This article examines the various Liar paradoxes and their near kin, Grelling’s paradox and Gödel’s Incompleteness Theorem with its self-referential Gödel sentence. It finds the family of paradoxes to be generated by circular definition–whether of statements, predicates, or sentences–a manoeuvre that generates pseudo-statements afflicted with the Liar syndrome: semantic vacuity, semantic incoherence, and predicative catalepsy. Such statements, e.g., the self-referential Liar statement, are meaningless, and hence fail to say anything, a point that invalidates the reasoning on which the various paradoxes (...)
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  35.  14
    David Johnstone (2007). Economic Darwinism: Who has the Best Probabilities? [REVIEW] Theory and Decision 62 (1):47-96.
    Simulation evidence obtained within a Bayesian model of price-setting in a betting market, where anonymous gamblers queue to bet against a risk-neutral bookmaker, suggests that a gambler who wants to maximize future profits should trade on the advice of the analyst cum probability forecaster who records the best probability score, rather than the highest trading profits, during the preceding observation period. In general, probability scoring rules, specifically the log score and better known “Brier” (quadratic) score, are found to have higher (...)
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  36. Albert A. Johnstone (1992). The Bodily Nature of the Self, or What Descartes Should Have Conceded Princess Elizabeth of Bohemia. In Maxine Sheets-Johnstone (ed.), Giving the Body Its Due.
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  37.  9
    Steven Johnstone (2002). Apology for the Manuscript of Demosthenes 59.67. American Journal of Philology 123 (2):229-256.
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  38.  6
    Hans Driesch & James Johnstone (1916). The History and Theory of Vitalism. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 13 (4):103-109.
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  39.  48
    Chaïm Perelman & Henry W. Johnstone (1968). Rhetoric and Philosophy. Philosophy and Rhetoric 1 (1):15 - 24.
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  40.  40
    D. J. Johnstone (1987). Tests of Significance Following R. A. Fisher. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 38 (4):481-499.
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  41.  6
    Joel David Hamkins & Thomas A. Johnstone (2014). Resurrection Axioms and Uplifting Cardinals. Archive for Mathematical Logic 53 (3-4):463-485.
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  42.  76
    Henry W. Johnstone Jr (1978). Does Death Have a Nature? Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 3 (1):8-23.
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  43.  64
    D. J. Johnstone (1988). Hypothesis Tests and Confidence Intervals in the Single Case. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 39 (3):353-360.
  44.  8
    Johnstone Jr (1963). The Logic of Perfection and Other Essays in Neoclassical Metaphysics. [REVIEW] Journal of Philosophy 60 (16):467-472.
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  45.  5
    Carsten Butz & Peter Johnstone (1998). Classifying Toposes for First-Order Theories. Annals of Pure and Applied Logic 91 (1):33-58.
    By a classifying topos for a first-order theory , we mean a topos such that, for any topos models of in correspond exactly to open geometric morphisms → . We show that not every first-order theory has a classifying topos in this sense, but we characterize those which do by an appropriate ‘smallness condition’, and we show that every Grothendieck topos arises as the classifying topos of such a theory. We also show that every first-order theory has a conservative extension (...)
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  46.  8
    Ian M. Johnstone (1992). Reading Chesterton's. The Chesterton Review 18 (1):135-137.
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  47.  10
    D. J. Johnstone & D. V. Lindley (1995). Bayesian Inference Given Data?Significant At??: Tests of Point Hypotheses. Theory and Decision 38 (1):51-60.
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  48.  6
    Martha S. Cheng & Barbara Johnstone (2002). Reasons for Reason-Giving in a Public-Opinion Survey. Argumentation 16 (4):401-420.
    This paper explores why respondents to a telephone public-opinion survey often give reasons for answering as they do, even though reason-giving is neither required nor encouraged and it is difficult to see the reasons as attempts to deal with disagreement. We find that respondents give reasons for the policy claims they make in their answers three times as frequently as they give reasons for value or factual claims, that their reasons tend to involve appeals to personal experience, and that they (...)
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  49.  46
    P. T. Johnstone (1987). Notes on Logic and Set Theory. Cambridge University Press.
    A succinct introduction to mathematical logic and set theory, which together form the foundations for the rigorous development of mathematics. Suitable for all introductory mathematics undergraduates, Notes on Logic and Set Theory covers the basic concepts of logic: first-order logic, consistency, and the completeness theorem, before introducing the reader to the fundamentals of axiomatic set theory. Successive chapters examine the recursive functions, the axiom of choice, ordinal and cardinal arithmetic, and the incompleteness theorems. Dr. Johnstone has included numerous exercises designed (...)
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  50. Henry W. Johnstone (1980). Validity and Rhetoric in Philosophical Argument: An Outlook in Transition. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 40 (3):451-452.
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1 — 50 / 267