Search results for 'Kyburg Jr' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Henry E. Kyburg (ed.) (1984). Theory and Measurement. Cambridge University Press.score: 360.0
    Measurement is fundamental to all the sciences, the behavioural and social as well as the physical and in the latter its results provide our paradigms of 'objective fact'. But the basis and justification of measurement is not well understood and is often simply taken for granted. Henry Kyburg Jr proposes here an original, carefully worked out theory of the foundations of measurement, to show how quantities can be defined, why certain mathematical structures are appropriate to them and what meaning (...)
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  2. Henry E. Kyburg Jr (1958). The Justification of Deduction. Review of Metaphysics 12 (1):19 - 25.score: 240.0
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  3. Henry E. Kyburg Jr (1992). Getting Fancy with Probability. Synthese 90 (2):189 - 203.score: 240.0
    There are a number of reasons for being interested in uncertainty, and there are also a number of uncertainty formalisms. These formalisms are not unrelated. It is argued that they can all be reflected as special cases of the approach of taking probabilities to be determined by sets of probability functions defined on an algebra of statements. Thus, interval probabilities should be construed as maximum and minimum probabilities within a set of distributions, Glenn Shafer's belief functions should be construed as (...)
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  4. Henry E. Kyburg Jr (1968). Bets and Beliefs. American Philosophical Quarterly 5 (1):54 - 63.score: 240.0
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  5. Henry E. Kyburg Jr (2002). Don't Take Unnecessary Chances! Synthese 132 (1/2):9 - 26.score: 240.0
    The dominant argument for the introduction of propensities or chances as an interpretation of probability depends on the difficulty of accounting for single case probabilities. We argue that in almost all cases, the "single case" application of probability can be accounted for otherwise. "Propensities" are needed only in theoretical contexts, and even there applications of probability need only depend on propensities indirectly.
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  6. Henry E. Kyburg Jr (1964). Recent Work in Inductive Logic. American Philosophical Quarterly 1 (4):249 - 287.score: 240.0
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  7. Henry E. Kyburg Jr (1965). Salmon's Paper. Philosophy of Science 32 (2):147 - 151.score: 240.0
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  8. Fahiem Bacchus, Henry E. Kyburg Jr & Mariam Thalos (1990). Against Conditionalization. Synthese 85 (3):475 - 506.score: 240.0
  9. Henry E. Kyburg Jr (1971). Epistemological Probability. Synthese 23 (2/3):309 - 326.score: 240.0
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  10. Henry E. Kyburg Jr (1970). On a Certain Form of Philosophical Argument. American Philosophical Quarterly 7 (3):229 - 237.score: 240.0
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  11. Henry E. Kyburg Jr (1965). Comments on Salmon's "Inductive Evidence". American Philosophical Quarterly 2 (4):274 - 276.score: 240.0
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  12. Henry E. Kyburg Jr (1981). Leeds' Infernal Machine. Philosophy of Science 48 (1):92 - 94.score: 240.0
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  13. Henry E. Kyburg Jr (2001). Probability as a Guide in Life. The Monist 84 (2):135 - 152.score: 240.0
    Bishop Butler, [Butler, 1736], said that probability was the very guide of life. But what interpretations of probability can serve this function? It isn't hard to see that empirical (frequency) views won't do, and many recent writers—for example John Earman, who has said that Bayesianism is "the only game in town"—have been persuaded by various dutch book arguments that only subjective probability will perform the function required. We will defend the thesis that probability construed in this way offers very little (...)
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  14. Henry E. Kyburg Jr (1976). Chance. Journal of Philosophical Logic 5 (3):355 - 393.score: 240.0
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  15. Henry E. Kyburg Jr (1977). Decisions, Conclusions, and Utilities. Synthese 36 (1):87 - 96.score: 240.0
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  16. Henry E. Kyburg Jr (1979). Direct Measurement. American Philosophical Quarterly 16 (4):259 - 272.score: 240.0
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  17. Henry E. Kyburg Jr (1977). Reply to Professor Freudenthal. Synthese 36 (4):493 - 498.score: 240.0
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  18. Henry E. Kyburg Jr (1987). The Hobgoblin. The Monist 70 (2):141 - 151.score: 240.0
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  19. Wesley C. Salmon (1967). Book Review:Probability and the Logic of Rational Belief Henry E. Kyburg, Jr. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 34 (3):283-.score: 90.0
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  20. Stephen Spielman (1986). Book Review:Epistemology and Inference Henry E. Kyburg, Jr. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 53 (1):149-.score: 90.0
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  21. Susan Haack (2007). Thanks, but No Thanks : Response to Henry Kyburg, Jr. In Cornelis De Waal (ed.), Susan Haack: A Lady of Distinctions: The Philosopher Responds to Critics. Prometheus Books.score: 90.0
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  22. Alex C. Michalos (1969). Book Review:Philosophy of Science A: Formal Approach Henry E. Kyburg, Jr. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 36 (3):326-.score: 90.0
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  23. W. Balzer & C. M. Dawe (1986). KYBURG Jr, H. E. [1984]: Theory and Measurement. Cambridge University Press. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 37 (4):506-510.score: 90.0
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  24. William Harper & Gregory Wheeler (2007). Probability and Inference: Essays in Honour of Henry E. Kyburg, Jr. College Publications.score: 90.0
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  25. Henry E. Kyburg Jr (1983). The Reference Class. Philosophy of Science 50 (3):374-397.score: 60.0
    The system presented by the author in The Logical Foundations of Statistical Inference (Kyburg 1974) suffered from certain technical difficulties, and from a major practical difficulty; it was hard to be sure, in discussing examples and applications, when you had got hold of the right reference class. The present paper, concerned mainly with the characterization of randomness, resolves the technical difficulties and provides a well structured framework for the choice of a reference class. The definition of randomness that leads (...)
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  26. Henry Ely Kyburg (1990). Science & Reason. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    In this work Henry Kyburg presents his views on a wide range of philosophical problems associated with the study and practice of science and mathematics. The main structure of the book consists of a presentation of Kyburg's notions of epistemic probability and its use in the scientific enterprise i.e., the effort to modify previously adopted beliefs in the light of experience. Intended for cognitive scientists and people in artificial intelligence as well as for technically oriented philosophers, the book (...)
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  27. Gregory Wheeler (2007). A Review of the Lottery Paradox. [REVIEW] In William Harper & Gregory Wheeler (eds.), Probability and Inference: Essays in Honour of Henry E. Kyburg, Jr.score: 36.0
    Henry Kyburg’s lottery paradox (1961, p. 197) arises from considering a fair 1000 ticket lottery that has exactly one winning ticket. If this much is known about the execution of the lottery it is therefore rational to accept that one ticket will win. Suppose that an event is very likely if the probability of its occurring is greater than 0.99. On these grounds it is presumed rational to accept the proposition that ticket 1 of the lottery will not win. (...)
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  28. Henry E. Kyburg Jr (1961). A Modest Proposal Concerning Simplicity. Philosophical Review 70 (3):390-395.score: 36.0
    Kyburg proposes the following test for the simplicity of a theory: the complexity of a theory is measured by the number of quantifiers that occur in the set of statements comprising the theory. (staff).
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  29. Antony Eagle (2005). Randomness Is Unpredictability. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 56 (4):749-790.score: 30.0
    The concept of randomness has been unjustly neglected in recent philosophical literature, and when philosophers have thought about it, they have usually acquiesced in views about the concept that are fundamentally flawed. After indicating the ways in which these accounts are flawed, I propose that randomness is to be understood as a special case of the epistemic concept of the unpredictability of a process. This proposal arguably captures the intuitive desiderata for the concept of randomness; at least it should suggest (...)
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  30. Alan Hájek (2003). Conditional Probability Is the Very Guide of Life. In Kyburg Jr, E. Henry & Mariam Thalos (eds.), Probability is the Very Guide of Life: The Philosophical Uses of Chance. Open Court. 183--203.score: 30.0
    in Probability is the Very Guide of Life: The Philosophical Uses of Chance, eds. Henry Kyburg, Jr. and Mariam Thalos, Open Court. Abridged version in Proceedings of the International Society for Bayesian Analysis 2002.
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  31. Shelley L. Galvin & Harold A. Herzog Jr (1992). Ethical Ideology, Animal Rights Activism, and Attitudes Toward the Treatment of Animals. Ethics and Behavior 2 (3):141 – 149.score: 30.0
    In two studies, we used the Ethics Position Questionnaire (EPQ) to investigate the relationship between individual differences in moral philosophy, involvement in the animal rights movement, and attitudes toward the treatment of animals. In the first, 600 animal rights activists attending a national demonstration and 266 nonactivist college students were given the EPQ. Analysis of the returns from 157 activists and 198 students indicated that the activists were more likely than the students to hold an "absolutist" moral orientation (high idealism, (...)
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  32. Henry E. Kyburg Jr (1956). The Justification of Induction. Journal of Philosophy 53 (12):394-400.score: 30.0
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  33. Jeffrey Helzner (2012). On the Representation of Error. Synthese 186 (2):601-613.score: 30.0
    Though he maintained a significant interest in theoretical aspects of measurement, Henry E. Kyburg, Jr. was critical of the representational theory that in many ways has come to dominate discussions concerning the foundations of measurement. In particular, Kyburg (in Savage and Ehrlich (eds) Philosophical and foundational issues in measurement theory, 1992 ) asserts that the representational theory of measurement, as introduced in (Scott and Suppes, Journal of Symbolic Logic, 23:113–128, 1958 ) and developed in (Krantz et al., Foundations (...)
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  34. Henry E. Kyburg Jr (2006). Belief, Evidence, and Conditioning. Philosophy of Science 73 (1):42-65.score: 30.0
    Since Ramsey, much discussion of the relation between probability and belief has taken for granted that there are degrees of belief, i.e., that there is a real-valued function, B, that characterizes the degree of belief that an agent has in each statement of his language. It is then supposed that B is a probability. It is then often supposed that as the agent accumulates evidence, this function should be updated by conditioning: BE(·) should be B(·E)/B(E). Probability is also important in (...)
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  35. Henry E. Kyburg Jr (1997). Quantities, Magnitudes, and Numbers. Philosophy of Science 64 (3):377-410.score: 30.0
    Quantities are naturally viewed as functions, whose arguments may be construed as situations, events, objects, etc. We explore the question of the range of these functions: should it be construed as the real numbers (or some subset thereof)? This is Carnap's view. It has attractive features, specifically, what Carnap views as ontological economy. Or should the range of a quantity be a set of magnitudes? This may have been Helmholtz's view, and it, too, has attractive features. It reveals the close (...)
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  36. Henry E. Kyburg Jr (2001). Real Logic is Nonmonotonic. Minds and Machines 11 (4):577-595.score: 30.0
    Charles Morgan has argued that nonmonotonic logic is ``impossible''. We show here that those arguments are mistaken, and that Morgan's preferred alternative, the representation of nonmonotonic reasoning by ``presuppositions'' fails to provide a framework in which nonmonotonic reasoning can be constructively criticised. We argue that an inductive logic, based on probabilistic acceptance, offers more than Morgan's approach through presuppositions.
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  37. Henry E. Kyburg Jr (2010). Subjective Probability : Criticisms, Reflections and Problems. [REVIEW] In Antony Eagle (ed.), Journal of Philosophical Logic. Routledge. 157 - 180.score: 30.0
  38. Henry E. Kyburg Jr (1980). Conditionalization. Journal of Philosophy 77 (2):98-114.score: 30.0
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  39. Henry E. Kyburg Jr (1997). The Rule of Adjunction and Reasonable Inference. Journal of Philosophy 94 (3):109-125.score: 30.0
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  40. Henry E. Kyburg Jr (1977). A Defense of Conventionalism. Noûs 11 (2):75-95.score: 30.0
  41. Henry E. Kyburg Jr (1961). Probability and Rationality. Philosophical Quarterly 11 (44):193-200.score: 30.0
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  42. Henry E. Kyburg Jr (1969). Measurement and Mathematics. Journal of Philosophy 66 (2):29-42.score: 30.0
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  43. Henry E. Kyburg Jr (1983). Levi, Petersen, and Direct Inference. Philosophy of Science 50 (4):630-634.score: 30.0
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  44. Henry E. Kyburg Jr (1958). R. B. Braithwaite on Probability and Induction. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 9 (35):203-220.score: 30.0
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  45. Henry E. Kyburg Jr (1970). Two World Views. Noûs 4 (4):337-348.score: 30.0
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  46. Henry E. Kyburg Jr (1965). Salmon's Paper. Philosophy of Science 32 (2):147-151.score: 30.0
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  47. Henry E. Kyburg Jr (1978). How to Make Up a Theory. Philosophical Review 87 (1):84-87.score: 30.0
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  48. Henry E. Kyburg Jr (2001). Probability as a Guide in Life. The Monist 84 (2):135-152.score: 30.0
    Bishop Butler, [Butler, 1736], said that probability was the very guide of life. But what interpretations of probability can serve this function? It isn’t hard to see that empirical (frequency) views won’t do, and many recent writers-for example John Earman, who has said that Bayesianism is “the only game in town”-have been persuaded by various dutch book arguments that only subjective probability will perform the function required. We will defend the thesis that probability construed in this way offers very little (...)
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  49. Kyburg Jr (1995). Book Review:Betting on Theories Patrick Maher. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 62 (2):343-.score: 30.0
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  50. Henry E. Kyburg Jr (1981). Principle Investigation. Journal of Philosophy 78 (12):772-778.score: 30.0
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