Search results for 'MICE' (try it on Scholar)

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Profile: Keren Mice (Independent researcher)
  1. Monika Piotrowska (2013). From Humanized Mice to Human Disease: Guiding Extrapolation From Model to Target. Biology and Philosophy 28 (3):439-455.score: 18.0
    Extrapolation from a well-understood base population to a less-understood target population can fail if the base and target populations are not sufficiently similar. Differences between laboratory mice and humans, for example, can hinder extrapolation in medical research. Mice that carry a partial or complete human physiological system, known as humanized mice, are supposed to make extrapolation more reliable by simulating a variety of human diseases. But what justifies our belief that these mice are similar enough to (...)
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  2. Soraya de Chadarevian (2006). Mice and the Reactor: The “Genetics Experiment” in 1950s Britain. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 39 (4):707-735.score: 15.0
    The postwar investments by several governments into the development of atomic energy for military and peaceful uses fuelled the fears not only of the exposure to acute doses of radiation as could be expected from nuclear accidents or atomic warfare but also of the long-term effects of low-dose exposure to radiation. Following similar studies pursued under the aegis of the Manhattan Project in the United States, the “genetics experiment” discussed by scientists and government officials in Britain soon after the war, (...)
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  3. Paul Bloom (1998). Different Structures for Concepts of Individuals, Stuffs, and Real Kinds: One Mama, More Milk, and Many Mice. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (1):66-67.score: 12.0
    Although our concepts of “Mama,” “milk,” and “mice” have much in common, the suggestion that they are identical in structure in the mind of the prelinguistic child is mistaken. Even infants think about objects as different from substances and appreciate the distinction between kinds (e.g., mice) and individuals (e.g., Mama). Such cognitive capacities exist in other animals as well, and have important adaptive consequences.
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  4. Peter Vallentyne (2005). Of Mice and Men: Equality and Animals. [REVIEW] Journal of Ethics 9 (3-4):403 - 433.score: 12.0
    Can material Egalitarianism (requiring, for example, the significant promotion of fortune) include animals in the domain of the equality requirement? The problem can be illustrated as follows: If equality of wellbeing is what matters, and normal mice are included in this egalitarian requirement, then normal mice have a much stronger claim to resources than almost any human. This is because normal mice have a much stronger claim to resources than almost any human. This is because their wellbeing (...)
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  5. Matthew C. Haug (2007). Of Mice and Metaphysics: Natural Selection and Realized Population‐Level Properties. Philosophy of Science 74 (4):431-451.score: 12.0
    In this paper, I answer a fundamental question facing any view according to which natural selection is a population‐level causal process—namely, how is the causal process of natural selection related to, yet not preempted by, causal processes that occur at the level of individual organisms? Without an answer to this grounding question, the population‐level causal view appears unstable—collapsing into either an individual‐level causal interpretation or the claim that selection is a purely formal, statistical phenomenon. I argue that a causal account (...)
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  6. Camilla Flodin (2011). Of Mice and Men: Adorno on Art and the Suffering of Animals. Estetika 48 (2):139-156.score: 12.0
    Theodor W. Adorno’s criticism of human beings’ domination of nature is a familiar topic to Adorno scholars. Its connection to the central relationship between art and nature in his aesthetics has, however, been less analysed. In the following paper, I claim that Adorno’s discussion of art’s truth content (Wahrheitsgehalt) is to be understood as art’s ability to give voice to nature (both human and non-human) since it has been subjugated by the growth of civilization. I focus on repressed non-human nature (...)
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  7. F. Barbara Orlans (2000). The Injustice of Excluding Laboratory Rats, Mice, and Birds From the Animal Welfare Act. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 10 (3):229-238.score: 12.0
    : A major shortcoming of the Animal Welfare Act is its exclusion of the species most-used in experimentation-rats, mice, and birds. Considerations of justice dictate that extension of the law to these three species is the morally right thing to do. A brief history of how these species came to be excluded from the laws protecting laboratory animals is also provided, as well as discussion of the implications and significance of expanding the law.
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  8. Piers J. Hale (2010). Of Mice and Men: Evolution and the Socialist Utopia. William Morris, H.G. Wells, and George Bernard Shaw. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 43 (1):17 - 66.score: 12.0
    During the British socialist revival of the 1880s competing theories of evolution were central to disagreements about strategy for social change. In News from Nowhere (1891), William Morris had portrayed socialism as the result of Lamarckian processes, and imagined a non-Malthusian future. H.G. Wells, an enthusiastic admirer of Morris in the early days of the movement, became disillusioned as a result of the Malthusianism he learnt from Huxley and his subsequent rejection of Lamarckism in light of Weismann's experiments on (...). This brought him into conflict with his fellow Fabian, George Bernard Shaw, who rejected neo-Darwinism in favour of a Lamarckian conception of change he called "creative evolution.". (shrink)
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  9. Ronald Jensen, Ernest Schimmerling, Ralf Schindler & John Steel (2009). Stacking Mice. Journal of Symbolic Logic 74 (1):315-335.score: 12.0
    We show that either of the following hypotheses imply that there is an inner model with a proper class of strong cardinals and a proper class of Woodin cardinals. 1) There is a countably closed cardinal k ≥ N₃ such that □k and □(k) fail. 2) There is a cardinal k such that k is weakly compact in the generic extension by Col(k, k⁺). Of special interest is 1) with k = N₃ since it follows from PFA by theorems of (...)
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  10. Olga Vygonyailova Sofia Panteleeva, Zhanna Reznikova (2013). Quantity Judgments in the Context of Risk/Reward Decision Making in Striped Field Mice: First “Count,” Then Hunt. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 12.0
    We simulated the vital situation of risky hunting in the striped field mouse Apodemus agrarius in order to examine whether these animals are able to make a choice between small and large quantities of live prey (ants). In the first (preliminary) experiment we investigated to what extent mice were interested in ants as a live prey and how their hunting activity depended on the quantity of these edible but rather aggressive insects. We placed mice one by one into (...)
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  11. Daniel W. Cunningham (1998). The Fine Structure of Real Mice. Journal of Symbolic Logic 63 (3):937-994.score: 12.0
    Before one can construct scales of minimal complexity in the Real Core Model, K(R), one needs to develop the fine-structure theory of K(R). In this paper, the fine structure theory of mice, first introduced by Dodd and Jensen, is generalized to that of real mice. A relative criterion for mouse iterability is presented together with two theorems concerning the definability of this criterion. The proof of the first theorem requires only fine structure; whereas, the second theorem applies to (...)
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  12. Farmer Schlutzenberg (2012). Homogeneously Suslin Sets in Tame Mice. Journal of Symbolic Logic 77 (4):1122-1146.score: 12.0
    This paper studies homogeneously Suslin (hom) sets of reals in tame mice. The following results are established: In 0 ¶ the hom sets are precisely the [Symbol] sets. In M n every hom set is correctly [Symbol] and (δ + 1)-universally Baire where ä is the least Woodin. In M u every hom set is <λ-hom, where λ is the supremum of the Woodins.
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  13. Zhengui Xia & Daniel R. Storm (1995). Evidence That the Type I Adenylyl Cyclase May Be Important for Neuroplasticity: Mutant Mice Deficient in the Gene for Type I Adenylyl Cyclase Show Altered Behavior and LTP. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (3):498-500.score: 12.0
    The regulatory properties of the neurospecific, type I adenylyl cyclase and its distribution within brain have suggested that this enzyme may be important for neuroplasticity. To address this issue, the murine, Ca2+ -stimulated adenylyl cyclase (type I), was inactivated by targeted mutagenesis. Ca2+ -stimulated adenylyl cyclase activity was reduced 40% to 60% in the hippocampus, neocortex, and cerebellum. Long term potentiation in the CA1 region of the hippocampus from mutants was perturbed relative to controls. Both the initial slope and maxim (...)
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  14. Bernard E. Rollin (2007). Of Mice and Men. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (5):55 – 57.score: 9.0
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  15. Austen Clark (1993). Mice, Shrews, and Misrepresentation. Journal of Philosophy 60 (6):290-310.score: 9.0
  16. Mark Glouberman (2008). Of Mice and Men: God and the Canadian Supreme Court. Ratio Juris 21 (1):107-124.score: 9.0
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  17. Cynthia B. Cohen (2003). Creating Human-Nonhuman Chimeras: Of Mice and Men. American Journal of Bioethics 3 (3):3 – 5.score: 9.0
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  18. Jeff Foss (1991). On Saving the Phenomena and the Mice: A Reply to Bourgeois Concerning Van Fraassen's Image of Science. Philosophy of Science 58 (2):278-287.score: 9.0
    In the fusillade he lets fly against Foss (1984), Bourgeois (1987) sometimes hits a live target. I admit that I went beyond the letter of van Fraassen's The Scientific Image (1980), making inferences and drawing conclusions which are often absurd. I maintain, however, that the absurdities must be charged to van Fraassen's account. While I cannot redress every errant shot of Bourgeois, his essay reveals the need for further discussion of the concepts of the phenomena and the observables as used (...)
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  19. Rachel A. Ankeny (2000). Marvelling at the Marvel: The Supposed Conversion of A. D. Darbishire to Mendelism. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 33 (2):315 - 347.score: 9.0
    The so-called "biometric-Mendelian controversy" has received much attention from science studies scholars. This paper focuses on one scientist involved in this debate, Arthur Dukinfield Darbishire, who performed a series of hybridization experiments with mice beginning in 1901. Previous historical work on Darbishire's experiments and his later attempt to reconcile Mendelian and biometric views describe Darbishire as eventually being "converted" to Mendelism. I provide a new analysis of this episode in the context of Darbishire's experimental results, his underlying epistemology, and (...)
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  20. Giles Pearson (2006). 'Does the Fearless Phobic Really Fear the Squeak of Mice “Too Much”?'. Ancient Philosophy 26 (1):81-91.score: 9.0
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  21. Helena Pedersen (2012). Undercover Education: Mice, Mimesis, and Parasites in the Teaching Machine. Studies in Philosophy and Education 31 (4):365-386.score: 9.0
    What happens to education when the potential it helps realizing in the individual works against the formal purposes of the curriculum? What happens when education becomes a vehicle for its own subversion? As a subject-forming state apparatus working on ideological speciesism, formal education is engaged in both human and animal stratification in service of the capitalist knowledge economy. This seemingly stable condition is however insecured by the animal rights activist as undercover learner and—worker, who enters education and research laboratories under (...)
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  22. K. V. Wilkes (1991). Of Mice and Men: The Comparative Assumption in Psychology. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 5 (1):3 – 19.score: 9.0
    Abstract Surprisingly, little theoretical attention has so far been paid to the ?Comparative Assumption?: the attempt to extrapolate from species to species in psychology (and particularly to the human species). This paper examines the problems and the possibilities inherent in the Comparative Assumption. Perhaps the most important conclusion of the paper is that much more work is needed on this intriguing question.
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  23. Holger Schultheis & Harald Lachnit (2009). Of Mice and Men: Revisiting the Relation of Nonhuman and Human Learning. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (2):224-225.score: 9.0
    To support their main claim, Mitchell et al. broach the issue of the relationship between the learning performance of human and nonhuman animals. We show that their argumentation is problematic both theoretically and empirically. In fact, results from learning studies with humans and honey-bees strongly suggest that human learning is not entirely propositional.
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  24. Ross Cogan (1998). Dudman and the Plans of Mice and Men. Philosophical Quarterly 48 (190):88-95.score: 9.0
    V.H. Dudman has argued that a better semantic account of the conditional emerges from placing grammar ‘in the driver's seat’. His account of their grammar identifies two main categories, which differ from those postulated by traditional theorists, and which he claims correspond to two very different and deep‐rooted styles of thought. I show that it is unlikely that a perfect match exists between styles of thought and grammatical categories in the way that Dudman postulates. I consider arguments by Dale and (...)
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  25. Laurie Zoloth, Leilah Backhus & Teresa Woodruff (2008). Waiting to Be Born: The Ethical Implications of the Generation of “Nuborn” and “Nuage” Mice From Pre-Pubertal Ovarian Tissue. American Journal of Bioethics 8 (6):21 – 29.score: 9.0
    Oncofertility is one of the 9 NIH Roadmap Initiatives, federal grants intended to explore previously intractable questions, and it describes a new field that exists in the liminal space between cancer treatment and its sequelae, IVF clinics and their yearning, and basic research in cell growth, biomaterials, and reproductive science and its tempting promises. Cancer diagnoses, which were once thought universally fatal, now often entail management of a chronic disease. Yet the therapies are rigorous, must start immediately, and in many (...)
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  26. Dagmar Schmauks (2000). Teddy Bears, Tarnagotchis, Transgenic Mice. Sign Systems Studies 28:309-324.score: 9.0
    The expression "artificial animal" denotes a range of different objects from teddy bears to the results of genetic engineering. As a basis for further investigation, this article first of all presents the main interpretations and traces their systematic interconnections. The subsequent sections concentrate on artificial animals in the context of play. The development of material toys is fueled by robotics. It gives toys artificial sense organs, limbs, and cognitive abilities, thus enabling them to act in the real world. The second (...)
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  27. Karen A. Rader (1999). Of Mice, Medicine, and Genetics: C. C. Little's Creation of the Inbred Laboratory Mouse, 1909–1918. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 30 (3):319-343.score: 9.0
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  28. Robin Kelsey (2009). Of Fish, Birds, Cats, Mice, Spiders, Flies, Pigs, and Chimpanzees: How Chance Casts the Historic Action Photograph Into Doubt. History and Theory 48 (4):59-76.score: 9.0
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  29. Ernest D. Kemble & Caroline Lewis (1982). Effects of Vibrissal Amputation on Cricket Predation in Northern Grasshopper Mice (Onychomys Leucogaster). Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 20 (5):275-276.score: 9.0
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  30. Jessica Pierce (2008). Mice in the Sink. Environmental Philosophy 5 (1):75-96.score: 9.0
    Empathy refers to a whole class or “cluster” of behaviors based in emotional linkage between individuals. The capacity for empathy is not unique to humans, but has evolved in a range of mammals that live in complex social groups. There is good evidence for empathy in primates, pachyderms, cetaceans, social carnivores, and rodents. Because empathy is grounded in the same neurological architecture as other prosocial behaviors such as trust, reciprocity, cooperation, and fairness, it seems likely that a whole suite of (...)
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  31. Jason Behrmann (2007). Review of Arthur L. Caplan, Smart Mice, Not-So-Smart People: An Interesting and Amusing Guide to Bioethics. [REVIEW] American Journal of Bioethics 7 (7):49-50.score: 9.0
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  32. Chini Bice (2013). The Oxytocin Receptor in Sociability and Cognitive Flexibility: What Do You Learn From Knockout Mice Models. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 9.0
  33. Lynda Birke (2008). Who-Orwhat-Arethe Rats (and Mice) in the Laboratory? In Susan J. Armstrong & Richard George Botzler (eds.), The Animal Ethics Reader. Routledge. 326.score: 9.0
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  34. W. J. Carr, Patricia A. Zunino & Michael R. Landauer (1980). Responses by Young House Mice (Mus Musculus) to Odors From Stressed Vs. Nonstressed Adult Conspecifics. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 15 (6):419-421.score: 9.0
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  35. Denys deCatanzaro & Emily Spironello (1998). Of Mice and Men: Androgen Dynamics in Dominance and Reproduction. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (3):371-371.score: 9.0
    In the animal literature, the concept of dominance usually links status in intermale encounters with differential reproductive success. Mazur & Booth effectively review the human literature correlating testosterone with intermale competition, but more profound questions relating this to male–female dynamics have yet to be addressed in research with humans.
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  36. Randolph M. Feezell (1984). Of Mice and Men. The Modern Schoolman 61 (4):259-265.score: 9.0
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  37. Richard B. Harris (1996). Approaches to Conserving Vulnerable Wildlife in China: Does the Colour of Cat Matter – If It Catches Mice? Environmental Values 5 (4):303 - 334.score: 9.0
    China's environmental problems are well known, but recently its record in the area of wildlife conservation, particularly with regard to endangered species, has come under scrutiny. Environmental values colour how we in the West view both China's past experience with wildlife and what strategies it should adopt to foster better conservation. Chinese have long taken a utilitarian view of wildlife, valuing species primarily as resources for man's use and only secondarily for other reasons. However, China has not developed institutions capable (...)
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  38. Andrew K. Hotchkiss, Gerald T. Ankley, Vickie S. Wilson, Phillip C. Hartig, Elizabeth J. Durhan, Kathleen M. Jensen, Dalma Martinovi & Leon E. Gray Jr (2008). Of Mice and Men (and Mosquitofish): Antiandrogens and Androgens in the Environment. Bioscience 58 (11):1037-1050.score: 9.0
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  39. A. K. (1999). Of Mice, Medicine, and Genetics: C. C. Little's Creation of the Inbred Laboratory Mouse, 1909-1918. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 30 (3):319-343.score: 9.0
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  40. Edward J. Richardson & Edward C. Simmel (1973). Moderation of Severity of Audiogenic Seizures in DBA/2 Mice Following Intraperitoneal Insertion. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 1 (6):429-430.score: 9.0
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  41. Sergio Sismondo (1997). Deflationary Metaphysics and the Construction of Laboratory Mice. Metaphilosophy 28 (3):219-232.score: 9.0
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  42. Lepore Angelo (2012). Degeneration of Phrenic Motor Neurons Induces Long-Term Diaphragm Deficits Following Mid-Cervical Spinal Contusion in Mice. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 9.0
  43. Detlev Arendt & Katharina N.�Bler-Jung (1996). Common Ground Plans in Early Brain Development in Mice and Flies. Bioessays 18 (3):255-259.score: 9.0
  44. Charles Bieberich & George Scangos (1986). Transgenic Mice in the Study of Immunology. Bioessays 4 (6):245-248.score: 9.0
  45. Barbara H. Bowman, Funmei Yang & Gwendolyn S. Adrian (1990). Expression of Human Plasma Protein Genes in Ageing Transgenic Mice. Bioessays 12 (7):317-322.score: 9.0
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  46. Roger Caldwell (2003). Of Men and Mice. Philosophy Now 42:34-34.score: 9.0
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  47. Anthony Cooper (1974). Effects of Accessory Olfactory Bulb Lesions on the Sexual Behavior of Male Mice. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 4 (4):419-420.score: 9.0
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  48. Anthony Cooper & Suzette Hathorn (1977). Modification of Flavor Preference by Olfactory Preexposure in Normal and Zinc-Sulfatetreated Mice. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 10 (5):369-370.score: 9.0
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  49. Anthony Cooper & Patrick J. Capretta (1976). Olfactory Bulb Removal and Taste Aversion Learning in Mice. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 7 (3):235-236.score: 9.0
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  50. James W. Garson (1993). Mice in Mirrored Mazes and the Mind. Philosophical Psychology 6 (2):123-34.score: 9.0
    The computational theory of cognition (CTC) holds that the mind is akin to computer software. This article aims to show that CTC is incorrect because it is not able to distinguish the ability to solve a maze from the ability to solve its mirror image. CTC cannot do so because it only individuates brain states up to isomorphism. It is shown that a finer individuation that would distinguish left-handed from right-handed abilities is not compatible with CTC. The view is explored (...)
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