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Profile: Kevin McCain (University of Alabama, Birmingham)
  1. Kevin McCain (2014). Evidentialism and Epistemic Justification. Routledge.
    Evidentialism is a popular theory of epistemic justification, yet, as early proponents of the theory Earl Conee and Richard Feldman admit, there are many elements that must be developed before Evidentialism can provide a full account of epistemic justification, or well-founded belief. It is the aim of this book to provide the details that are lacking; here McCain moves past Evidentialism as a mere schema by putting forward and defending a full-fledged theory of epistemic justification. In this book McCain offers (...)
     
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  2.  23
    Kevin McCain (2015). No Knowledge Without Evidence. Journal of Philosophical Research 40:369-376.
  3. Kevin McCain (2012). The Interventionist Account of Causation and the Basing Relation. Philosophical Studies 159 (3):357-382.
    It is commonplace to distinguish between propositional justification (having good reasons for believing p) and doxastic justification (believing p on the basis of those good reasons).One necessary requirement for bridging the gap between S’s merely having propositional justification that p and S’s having doxastic justification that p is that S base her belief that p on her reasons (propositional justification).A plausible suggestion for what it takes for S’s belief to be based on her reasons is that her reasons must contribute (...)
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  4.  18
    Kevin McCain (forthcoming). Explanationist Aid for Phenomenal Conservatism. Synthese:1-16.
    Phenomenal conservatism is a popular theory of epistemic justification. Despite its popularity and the fact that some think that phenomenal conservatism can provide a complete account of justification, it faces several challenges. Among these challenges are the need to provide accounts of defeaters and inferential justification. Fortunately, there is hope for phenomenal conservatism. Explanationism, the view on which justification is a matter of explanatory considerations, can help phenomenal conservatism with both of these challenges. The resulting view is one that respects (...)
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  5.  24
    Kevin McCain (2014). Evidentialism and Epistemic Justification. Routledge.
    Evidentialism is a popular theory of epistemic justification, yet, as early proponents of the theory Earl Conee and Richard Feldman admit, there are many elements that must be developed before Evidentialism can provide a full account of epistemic justification, or well-founded belief. It is the aim of this book to provide the details that are lacking; here McCain moves past Evidentialism as a mere schema by putting forward and defending a full-fledged theory of epistemic justification. In this book McCain offers (...)
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  6.  44
    Kevin McCain (2013). Explanationist Evidentialism. Episteme 10 (3):299-315.
    In their most recent co-authored work, Conee and Feldman (2008) suggest that epistemic support should be understood in terms of best explanations. Although this suggestion is plausible, Conee and Feldman admit that they have not provided the necessary details for a complete account of epistemic support. This article offers an explanationist account of epistemic support of the kind that Conee and Feldman suggest. It is argued that this account of epistemic support yields the intuitively correct results in a wide variety (...)
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  7.  11
    Kevin McCain (2016). Skepticism and Elegance. International Journal for the Study of Skepticism 6 (1):30-43.
    _ Source: _Volume 6, Issue 1, pp 30 - 43 Jonathan Vogel has argued in support of an explanationist response to skepticism in several works. Central to this explanationist response is the fact that our non-skeptical view of the world is a better explanation of our experiences than its skeptical rivals. Despite the plausibility of this response to skepticism, it is not without its critics. Recently, Matthew Gifford has argued that Vogel’s response has problems on two fronts. First, Gifford argues (...)
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  8. Shannon E. French & John McCain (2004). The Code of the Warrior: Exploring Warrior Values Past and Present. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Warrior cultures throughout history have developed unique codes that restrict their behavior and set them apart from the rest of society. But what possible reason could a warrior have for accepting such restraints? Why should those whose profession can force them into hellish kill-or-be-killed conditions care about such lofty concepts as honor, courage, nobility, duty, and sacrifice? And why should it matter so much to the warriors themselves that they be something more than mere murderers? The Code of the Warrior (...)
     
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  9.  29
    Kevin McCain (2014). Evidentialism, Explanationism, and Beliefs About the Future. Erkenntnis 79 (1):99-109.
    Earl Conee and Richard Feldman have argued that epistemic support should be understood in terms of explanatory considerations. Very roughly, they hold that one’s evidence supports a given proposition when that proposition is part of the best explanation of one’s evidence. This proposal is attractive, but T. Ryan Byerly has recently argued that it is false. Byerly claims that such explanationist accounts of epistemic support cannot account for the fact that one’s evidence can support propositions about the future. Although Byerly (...)
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  10.  59
    Kevin McCain (2012). Against Hanna on Phenomenal Conservatism. Acta Analytica 27 (1):45-54.
    Against Hanna on Phenomenal Conservatism Content Type Journal Article Pages 1-10 DOI 10.1007/s12136-012-0148-2 Authors Kevin McCain, Department of Philosophy, University of Rochester, Box 270078, Rochester, NY 14627-0078, USA Journal Acta Analytica Online ISSN 1874-6349 Print ISSN 0353-5150.
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  11. Kevin McCain (2008). The Virtues of Epistemic Conservatism. Synthese 164 (2):185 - 200.
    Although several important methodologies implicitly assume the truth of epistemic conservatism, the view that holding a belief confers some measure of justification on the belief, recent criticisms have led some to conclude that epistemic conservatism is an implausible view. That conclusion is mistaken. In this article, I propose a new formulation of epistemic conservatism that is not susceptible to the criticisms leveled at earlier formulations of epistemic conservatism. In addition to withstanding these criticisms, this formulation of epistemic conservatism has several (...)
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  12.  31
    Kevin McCain & Ted Poston (2014). Why Explanatoriness Is Evidentially Relevant. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 3 (2):145-153.
    William Roche and Elliott Sober argue that explanatoriness is evidentially irrelevant. This conclusion is surprising since it conflicts with a plausible assumption—the fact that a hypothesis best explains a given set of data is evidence that the hypothesis is true. We argue that Roche and Sober's screening-off argument fails to account for a key aspect of evidential strength: the weight of a body of evidence. The weight of a body of evidence affects the resiliency of probabilities in the light of (...)
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  13. Kevin McCain (2012). A Predictivist Argument Against Scepticism. Analysis 72 (4):660-665.
    Predictivism, the thesis that all things being equal a hypothesis that predicts a piece of evidence is better supported by that evidence than a hypothesis that only accommodates that evidence, comes in strong and weak forms. Interestingly, weak predictivism, which is widely accepted, can be used to formulate a persuasive argument against some forms of external world scepticism. In this article I formulate this predictivist argument and I explain why it deserves serious consideration despite the fact that it only succeeds (...)
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  14.  14
    Kevin McCain (2015). Is Forgotten Evidence a Problem for Evidentialism? Southern Journal of Philosophy 53 (4):471-480.
    The “problem of forgotten evidence” is a common objection to evidentialist theories of epistemic justification. This objection is motivated by cases where someone forms a belief on the basis of supporting evidence and then later forgets this evidence while retaining the belief. Critics of evidentialist theories argue that in some of these cases the person's belief remains justified. So, these critics claim that one can have a justified belief that is not supported by any evidence the subject possesses. I argue (...)
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  15.  74
    Kevin McCain & Brad Weslake (2013). Evolutionary Theory and the Epistemology of Science. In Kostas Kampourakis (ed.), The Philosophy of Biology: A Companion for Educators. Springer 101-119.
    Evolutionary theory is a paradigmatic example of a well-supported scientific theory. In this chapter we consider a number of objections to evolutionary theory, and show how responding to these objections reveals aspects of the way in which scientific theories are supported by evidence. Teaching these objections can therefore serve two pedagogical aims: students can learn the right way to respond to some popular arguments against evolutionary theory, and they can learn some basic features of the structure of scientific theories and (...)
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  16.  68
    Kevin McCain (2013). Two Skeptical Arguments or Only One? Philosophical Studies 164 (2):289-300.
    The first step in responding to the challenge of external world skepticism is to get clear on the structure of the skeptic’s argument. The most prominent varieties of skeptical arguments either rely on closure principles or underdetermination principles. The relationship between these two sorts of arguments is contentious. Some argue that these arguments can independently motivate skepticism. Others argue that they are really equivalent. I argue that although these two arguments are distinct, their independence is not as obvious as some (...)
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  17.  43
    Kevin McCain, Problem of the Criterion. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    The Problem of the Criterion The Problem of the Criterion is considered by many to be a fundamental problem of epistemology. In fact, Chisholm (1973, 1) claims that the Problem of the Criterion is “one of the most important and one of the most difficult of all the problems of philosophy.” A popular form of […].
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  18.  35
    Kevin McCain (2015). A New Evil Demon? No Problem for Moderate Internalists. Acta Analytica 30 (1):97-105.
    The New Evil Demon Problem is often seen as a serious objection to externalist theories of justification. In fact, some internalists think it is a decisive counterexample to externalism. Recently, Moon has argued that internalists face their own New Evil Demon Problem. According to Moon, it is possible for a demon to remove one’s unaccessed mental states while leaving the justificatory status of her accessed mental states unaffected. Since this is contrary to the claims of many forms of internalism, Moon (...)
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  19.  6
    Kevin McCain (2014). Skepticism and Elegance. New Content is Available for International Journal for the Study of Skepticism.
    _ Source: _Page Count 14 Jonathan Vogel has argued in support of an explanationist response to skepticism in several works. Central to this explanationist response is the fact that our non-skeptical view of the world is a better explanation of our experiences than its skeptical rivals. Despite the plausibility of this response to skepticism, it is not without its critics. Recently, Matthew Gifford has argued that Vogel’s response has problems on two fronts. First, Gifford argues that Vogel’s strategy for showing (...)
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  20.  25
    Kevin McCain & William Rowley (2014). Pick Your Poison: Beg the Question or Embrace Circularity. International Journal for the Study of Skepticism 4 (2):125-140.
  21.  29
    Kevin McCain (2014). Testimonial Knowledge From Lies. Philosophia 42 (2):459-468.
    Recently, Dan O’Brien has argued that there are situations in which a hearer can gain testimonial knowledge from a speaker who is lying. In order to make his case, O’Brien presents two examples where a speaker lies to a hearer, but supposedly the hearer comes to have testimonial knowledge on the basis of the lying speaker’s testimony. O’Brien claims that his examples demonstrate that lies can be used to pass on knowledge in a non-inferential fashion. I argue that O’Brien is (...)
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  22.  4
    Kevin McCain (2014). Skepticism and Elegance. Brill.
    _ Source: _Page Count 14 Jonathan Vogel has argued in support of an explanationist response to skepticism in several works. Central to this explanationist response is the fact that our non-skeptical view of the world is a better explanation of our experiences than its skeptical rivals. Despite the plausibility of this response to skepticism, it is not without its critics. Recently, Matthew Gifford has argued that Vogel’s response has problems on two fronts. First, Gifford argues that Vogel’s strategy for showing (...)
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  23.  1
    Garvin McCain, Richard Ward & Michael Lobb (1976). Reward Magnitude and a Comment. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 7 (1):90-92.
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  24. Garvin McCain, Michael Lobb & James Newberry (1976). Extended Training and Multiple Shifts: Percentage of Reward. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 8 (3):191-193.
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  25.  17
    Kevin McCain (2013). Scientific Method in Brief, by Hugh G. Gauch, Jr. [REVIEW] Teaching Philosophy 36 (3):310-313.
  26.  12
    Roger A. McCain (2007). Probabilistic Equilibria for Evolutionarily Stable Strategies. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (1):34-36.
    This commentary suggests that an equilibrium framework may be retained, in an evolutionary model such as Gintis's and with more satisfactory results, if rationality is relaxed in a slightly different way than he proposes: that is, if decisions are assumed to be related to rewards probabilistically, rather than with certainty. This relaxed concept of rationality gives rise to probabilistic equilibria. (Published Online April 27 2007).
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  27.  2
    Kevin Mccain (2008). The Virtues of Epistemic Conservatism. Synthese 164 (2):185-200.
  28. Garvin McCain, Michael Lobb, William Almand & David Leck (1976). Delay of Reinforcement: Extended Training and Multiple Shifts. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 7 (6):539-541.
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  29.  20
    McCain (1983). Cybernetics and the Economics of the Firm. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 58 (4):406-419.
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  30.  7
    Kevin McCain, Problem of the Criterion.
    The Problem of the Criterion The Problem of the Criterion is considered by many to be a fundamental problem of epistemology. In fact, Chisholm (1973, 1) claims that the Problem of the Criterion is “one of the most important and one of the most difficult of all the problems of philosophy.” A popular form of […].
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  31.  1
    Garvin McCain & John Cooney (1975). PCE I: The Effects of Three Reward Magnitude Shifts. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 6 (5):523-526.
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  32. Garvin Mccain, Annamarie BoodeÉ & Michael Lobb (1977). Extended Training: Delay of Reward. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 9 (2):111-112.
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  33.  1
    Paul Paulus, Garvin McCain & Verne Cox (1973). A Note on the Use of Prisons as Environments for Investigation of Crowding. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 1 (6):427-428.
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  34.  3
    Roger A. McCain (1994). Consequentialism in Haste. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (1):23.
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  35.  2
    Garvin Mccain, Calvin Garbin, Robin Mccain & Ming-Hong Huang (1983). Work in Progress: Prison Deaths, Ethnic Differences. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 21 (5):415-417.
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  36.  1
    Roger A. McCain (2014). Collaboration in Classical Political Economy and Noncooperative Game Theory. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 37 (3):265.
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  37. Kevin McCain (2011). Response to Levinas. Gnosis 8 (1):66-71.
     
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  38.  1
    Garvin Mccain & Gary Mcvean (1967). Effects of Prior Reinforcement or Nonreinforcement on Later Performance in a Double Alley. Journal of Experimental Psychology 73 (4p1):620.
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  39.  2
    Roger A. McCain (2000). Differences, Games, and Pluralism. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (5):688-689.
    While concurring that the evidence from individual differences supports a Meliorist view in the rationality debate, this commentary suggests that (1) the evidence does not clearly support a two-systems interpretation against an interpretation in terms of idiosyncratic differences in mental models, and that (2), especially where interactional processing is concerned, evidence from experimental game theory should also be considered.
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  40. Roger A. McCain & Richard Hamilton (2014). Coordination Games, Anti-Coordination Games, and Imitative Learning. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 37 (1):90-91.
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  41. Kevin McCain (2016). Evidentialism and Epistemic Justification. Routledge.
    Evidentialism is a popular theory of epistemic justification, yet, as early proponents of the theory Earl Conee and Richard Feldman admit, there are many elements that must be developed before Evidentialism can provide a full account of epistemic justification, or well-founded belief. It is the aim of this book to provide the details that are lacking; here McCain moves past Evidentialism as a mere schema by putting forward and defending a full-fledged theory of epistemic justification. In this book McCain offers (...)
     
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  42. John McCain (2006). The Virtues of the Quiet Hero. In Jay Allison, Dan Gediman, John Gregory & Viki Merrick (eds.), This I Believe: The Personal Philosophies of Remarkable Men and Women. H. Holt
     
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  43. K. E. Stanovich, R. F. West & R. A. McCain (2000). Individual Differences in Reasoning: Implications for the Rationality Debate?-Open Peer Commentary-Differences, Games, and Pluralism. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (5):688-688.
     
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