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Plato [222] Plato [191]Gottfried Plato [15]Benjamin Plato [11]
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See also:
Profile: Alex Plato (Franciscan University of Steubenville)
Profile: Ana P Plato
Profile: Petros Chola Plato (catholic university of malawi)
Profile: Socrates Plato (Columbia University)
Bibliography: Plato in Ancient Greek and Roman Philosophy
Bibliography: Mathematical Platonism in Philosophy of Mathematics
Bibliography: Middle Platonists in Ancient Greek and Roman Philosophy
Bibliography: Neoplatonists in Ancient Greek and Roman Philosophy
Bibliography: Cambridge Platonism in 17th/18th Century Philosophy
Bibliography: Plato: Metaphysics in Ancient Greek and Roman Philosophy
Bibliography: Plato: Epistemology in Ancient Greek and Roman Philosophy
Bibliography: Plato: Philosophy of Language in Ancient Greek and Roman Philosophy
Bibliography: Plato: Philosophy of Mind in Ancient Greek and Roman Philosophy
Bibliography: Plato: Philosophy of Science in Ancient Greek and Roman Philosophy
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  1. Plato, Apology, Crito, and Phaedo.
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  2. Plato, Apology, Crito, and Phaedo of Socrates.
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  3. Plato, Apology (Greek and English).
     
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  4. Plato, Alcibiades (Part 1) (Greek and English).
     
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  5. Plato, Alcibiades (Part 2) (Greek and English).
     
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  6. Plato, Charmides.
  7. Plato, Critias.
  8. Plato, Charmides (Greek and English).
     
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  9. Plato, Cleitophon (Greek and English).
     
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  10. Plato, Cratylus (Greek and English).
     
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  11. Plato, Euthyphro.
  12. Plato, Eryxias.
  13. Plato, Euthydemos.
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  14. Plato, Euthyphro (Greek and English).
     
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  15. Plato, Greater Hippias (Greek and English).
     
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  16. Plato, Hipparchus (Greek and English).
     
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  17. Plato, Ion.
  18. Plato, Ion (Greek and English).
     
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  19. Plato, Ion (Plato).
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  20. Plato, Laches.
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  21. Plato, Menexenus.
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  22. Plato, Menexenus (Greek and English).
     
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  23. Plato, Parmenides.
  24. Plato, Philebus.
  25. Plato, Philebus (Greek and English).
     
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  26. Plato, Republic (Greek and English).
     
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  27. Plato, Sophist.
  28. Plato, Statesman.
    The Statesman is Plato's neglected political work, but it is crucial for an understanding of the development of his political thinking. In its presentation of the statesman's expertise, The Statesman modifies, as well as defending in original ways, this central theme of the Republic. This new translation makes the dialogue accessible to students of political thought and the introduction outlines the philosophical and historical background necessary for a political theory readership.
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  29. Plato, Sophist (Greek and English).
     
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  30. Plato, Statesman (Greek and English).
     
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  31. Plato, Seventh Letter.
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  32. Plato, Selected Poems.
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  33. Plato, The Apology.
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  34. Plato, The Dialogues of Plato, Translated Into English with Analyses and Introductions, by B. Jowett.
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  35. Plato, The Dialogues of Plato, in 5 Volumes.
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  36. Plato, The First Alcibiades.
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  37. Plato, The Second Alcibiades.
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  38. Plato, The Seventh Letter.
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  39. Plato (forthcoming). Plato's Euthyphro, Apology, Crito, Phaedo. Audio CD.
    These dramatized, unabridged versions of Plato's Euthyphro, Apology, Crito, and Phaedo present the trial, imprisonment, and execution of Socrates, who Phaedo said was the "wisest, best, and most righteous person I have ever known."In the Euthyphro Socrates approaches the court where he will be tried on charges of atheism and corrupting the young. On the way he meets Euthyphro, an expert in religious matters. Socrates challenges Euthyphro's claim that ethics should be based on religion.In the Apology Socrates presents his own (...)
     
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  40. Plato (forthcoming). Plato's Ion & Meno. Audio CD.
    In Plato's Ion & Meno, Socrates questions Ion, an actor who just won a major prize, about his ability to interpret the epic poetry of Homer. As the dialogue proceeds, the nature of human creativity emerges as a mysterious process and an unsolved puzzle. A similar discussion between Socrates and Meno probes the subject of ethics. Can goodness be taught? If it can, then we should be able to find teachers capable of instructing others about what is good and bad, (...)
     
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  41. Plato (forthcoming). Plato's Republic, Books Five & Six. Audio CD.
    In Books Five and Six of The Republic, the quest for justice that has guided the dialogue from the beginning now shifts to the search for an even more encompassing quality—goodness. But what is the nature of goodness? Can human beings know it and teach it to others? How can it be manifested in the republic? To answer such questions requires a genuine lover of wisdom. How can such people be distinguished from those who simply pretend to know? This dramatized (...)
     
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  42. Plato (forthcoming). Plato's Republic, Books One & Two. Audio CD.
    In Books One and Two of The Republic presents a discussion of the nature of justice by Socrates, the aging Cephalus, his son Polemarchus, and the sophist Thrasymachus. Plato's brothers, Glaucon and Adeimantus, take over in Book Two, challenging Socrates to convince them that a just life is preferable to an unjust life with power, fame, and riches. They imagine and evaluate different ways of creating the best possible human life. First, they consider a republic based on health and simplicity. (...)
     
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  43. Plato (forthcoming). Plato's Republic, Books Seven & Eight. Audio CD.
    Book Seven of The Republic begins with the famous Allegory of the Cave, an exploration of the natural process of being educated. Socrates and Glaucon probe the meaning of this story both as it relates to the discussion of knowledge and reality developed earlier and to the concept of dialectic, the over-all method of Plato's dialogues. In Book Eight, Socrates and Plato's brothers explore five different kinds of republic and five different kinds of individual, showing how aristocracy becomes timocracy and (...)
     
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  44. Plato (forthcoming). Plato's Republic, Books Three & Four. Audio CD.
    In Books Three and Four of The Republic, Socrates and Plato's brothers, Glaucon and Adeimantus, discuss the best way to educate leaders for a just republic. In the course of their dialogue, the meaning of justice in individuals and in society shifts from external order imposed through rules and regulations to the harmony and balance internal to every person in the republic. Only then will an individual be ready to act—whether in acquiring wealth, in the care of the body, or (...)
     
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  45. Plato (forthcoming). Plato's Symposium. Audio CD.
    The dramatic nature of Plato’s dialogues is delightfully evident in the Symposium. The marriage between character and thought bursts forth as the guests gather at Agathon’s house to celebrate the success of his first tragedy. With wit and insight, they each present their ideas about love—from Erixymachus’s scientific naturalism to Aristophanes’ comic fantasy. The unexpected arrival of Alcibiades breaks the spell cast by Diotima’s ethereal climb up the staircase of love to beauty itself. Ecstasy and intoxication clash as Plato concludes (...)
     
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  46. Plato (2012). Epinomis. Kronos 2 (2).
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  47. Jan von Plato & Annika Siders (2012). Normal Derivability in Classical Natural Deduction. Review of Symbolic Logic 5 (2):205-211.
    A normalization procedure is given for classical natural deduction with the standard rule of indirect proof applied to arbitrary formulas. For normal derivability and the subformula property, it is sufficient to permute down instances of indirect proof whenever they have been used for concluding a major premiss of an elimination rule. The result applies even to natural deduction for classical modal logic.
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