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Profile: Raphael Woolf (King's College London)
  1.  58
    Raphael Woolf (2009). Truth as a Value in Plato's Republic. Phronesis 54 (1):9-39.
    To what extent is possession of truth considered a good thing in the Republic ? Certain passages of the dialogue appear to regard truth as a universal good, but others are more circumspect about its value, recommending that truth be withheld on occasion and falsehood disseminated. I seek to resolve this tension by distinguishing two kinds of truths, which I label 'philosophical' and 'non-philosophical'. Philosophical truths, I argue, are considered unqualifiedly good to possess, whereas non-philosophical truths are regarded as (...)
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  2.  43
    Raphael Woolf (2000). Callicles and Socrates: Psychic (Dis) Harmony in the Gorgias. Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 18 (Summer):1-40.
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  3.  43
    Raphael Woolf (2008). Socratic Authority. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 90 (1):1-38.
    This paper offers a critical examination of the notion of epistemic authority in Plato. In the Apology, Socrates claims a certain epistemic superiority over others, and it is easy to suppose that this might be explained in terms of third-person authority: Socrates knows the minds of others better than they know their own. Yet Socrates, as the text makes clear, is not the only one capable of getting the minds of others right. His epistemic edge is rather a matter of (...)
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  4.  28
    Raphael Woolf (1997). The Self in Plato's "Ion". Apeiron 30 (3):189 - 210.
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  5.  7
    Raphael Woolf (2008). Colloquium 1: Misology and Truth. Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 23 (1):1-24.
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  6.  8
    Raphael Woolf (forthcoming). Review: John M. Cooper, Pursuits of Wisdom: Six Ways of Life in Ancient Philosophy From Socrates to Plotinus. [REVIEW] Philosophical Explorations 124 (2):397-402,.
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  7.  34
    Raphael Woolf (2004). A Shaggy Soul Story: How Not to Read the Wax Tablet Model in Plato's Theaetetus. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 69 (3):573–604.
    This paper sets out to re-examine the famous Wax Tablet model in Plato's Theaetetus, in particular the section of it which appeals to the quality of individual souls' wax as an explanation of why some are more liable to make mistakes than others (194c-195a). This section has often been regarded as an ornamental flourish or a humorous appendage to the model's main explanatory business. Yet in their own appropriations both Aristotle and Locke treat the notion of variable wax quality as (...)
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  8.  4
    Raphael Woolf (2014). Cooper , John M. Pursuits of Wisdom: Six Ways of Life in Ancient Philosophy From Socrates to Plotinus . Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2012. Pp. 456. $35.00 (Cloth). [REVIEW] Ethics 124 (2):397-402.
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  9.  16
    Raphael Woolf (1999). The Written Word in Plato's Protagoras. Ancient Philosophy 19 (1):21-30.
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  10.  2
    Raphael Woolf (2006). (M.-K.) Lee Epistemology After Protagoras. Responses to Relativism in Plato, Aristotle, and Democritus. Oxford UP, 2005. Pp. X + 291. £45. 0199262225. [REVIEW] Journal of Hellenic Studies 126:211-212.
  11.  4
    Raphael Woolf (1999). The Coloration of Aristotelian Eye-Jelly: A Note on On Dreams 459b-460a. Journal of the History of Philosophy 37 (3):385-391.
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  12.  12
    Raphael Woolf (2010). Review of George Rudebusch, Socrates. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (4).
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  13.  3
    Raphael Woolf (2013). Cicero and Gyges. Classical Quarterly 63 (2):801-812.
    The tale of Gyges' ring narrated by Cicero at De officiis 3.38 is of course originally found, and acknowledged as such by Cicero, in Plato . I would like in this paper to address two questions about Cicero's handling of the tale – one historical, one philosophical. The purpose of the historical question is to evaluate, with respect to the Gyges narration, Cicero's quality as a reader of Plato. How well does Cicero understand the role of the story in its (...)
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  14.  15
    Raphael Woolf (1999). The Coloration of Aristotelian Eye-Jelly: A Note On. Journal of the History of Philosophy 37 (3).
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  15.  8
    Raphael Woolf (2004). Why Is Rhetoric Not a Skill? History of Philosophy Quarterly 21 (2):119 - 130.
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  16.  3
    Raphael Woolf (2009). Pleasure and Desire. In James Warren (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Epicureanism. Cambridge University Press 158.
  17.  8
    Raphael Woolf (2006). Nightingale (A.W.) Spectacles of Truth in Classical Greek Philosophy. Theoria in its Cultural Context . Pp. X + 311. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004. Cased, £45, US$75. ISBN: 0-521-83825-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 56 (01):49-.
  18.  10
    Raphael Woolf (2006). Review of Dominic Scott, Plato's Meno. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2006 (10).
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  19. Julia Annas & Raphael Woolf (eds.) (2005). Cicero: On Moral Ends. Cambridge University Press.
    This 2001 translation makes one of the most important texts in ancient philosophy available to modern readers. Cicero is increasingly being appreciated as an intelligent and well-educated amateur philosopher, and in this work he presents the major ethical theories of his time in a way designed to get the reader philosophically engaged in the important debates. Raphael Woolf's translation does justice to Cicero's argumentative vigour as well as to the philosophical ideas involved, while Julia Annas's introduction and notes provide a (...)
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  20. Brad Inwood & Raphael Woolf (eds.) (2012). Aristotle: Eudemian Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
    Aristotle's Eudemian Ethics has been unjustly neglected in comparison with its more famous counterpart the Nicomachean Ethics. This is in large part due to the fact that until recently no complete translation of the work has been available. But the Eudemian Ethics is a masterpiece in its own right, offering valuable insights into Aristotle's ideas on virtue, happiness and the good life. This volume offers a translation by Brad Inwood and Raphael Woolf that is both fluent and exact, and an (...)
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  21.  0
    Raphael Woolf (2000). Commentary on Kelsey. Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 16 (1):122-133.
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  22. Raphael Woolf (1998). David Roochnik, Of Art and Wisdom. [REVIEW] Philosophy in Review 18:224-225.
     
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