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Holmes Rolston [61] Rolston [20]I. I. I. Rolston [11] Rolston [5]
Jessica Smith Rolston [2]Howard L. Rolston [2]H. Rolston [2]Iii Rolston [1]

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Profile: Dorian Rolston (Princeton University)
  1.  10
    Holmes Rolston (1990). [Book Review] Environmental Ethics, Duties to and Values in the Natural World. [REVIEW] Ethics 100:195-197.
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  2. Holmes Rolston (1999). Genes, Genesis, and God: Values and Their Origins in Natural and Human History. Cambridge University Press.
    Holmes Rolston challenges the sociobiological orthodoxy that would naturalize science, ethics, and religion. The book argues that genetic processes are not blind, selfish, and contingent, and that nature is therefore not value-free. The author examines the emergence of complex biodiversity through evolutionary history. Especially remarkable in this narrative is the genesis of human beings with their capacities for science, ethics, and religion. A major conceptual task of the book is to relate cultural genesis to natural genesis. There (...)
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  3. Holmes Rolston (1994). Conserving Natural Value. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  4.  11
    Holmes Rolston (1987/2006). Science & Religion: A Critical Survey. Templeton Foundation Press.
    This acclaimed book is back in print with a new introduction by its award-winning author.
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  5.  12
    Rolston (1994). Environmental Ethics. Environmental Ethics 16 (2):219-224.
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  6.  85
    Rolston (1982). Are Values in Nature Subjective or Objective? Environmental Ethics 4 (2):125-151.
    Prevailing accounts of natural values as the subjective response of the human mind are reviewed and contested. Discoveries in the physical sciences tempt us to strip the reality away from many native-range qualities, including values, but discoveries in the biological sciences counterbalance this by finding sophisticated structures and selective processes in earthen nature. On the one hand, all human knowing and valuing contain subjective components, being theory-Iaden. On the other hand, in ordinary natural affairs, in scientific knowing, and in valuing, (...)
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  7.  7
    Holmes Rolston, Iii (1999). Genes, Genesis, and God: Values and Their Origins in Natural and Human History. Cambridge University Press.
    Holmes Rolston challenges the sociobiological orthodoxy that would naturalize science, ethics, and religion. The book argues that genetic processes are not blind, selfish, and contingent, and that nature is therefore not value-free. The author examines the emergence of complex biodiversity through evolutionary history. Especially remarkable in this narrative is the genesis of human beings with their capacities for science, ethics, and religion. A major conceptual task of the book is to relate cultural genesis to natural genesis. There (...)
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  8. Andrew Light & Holmes Rolston (eds.) (2002). Environmental Ethics: An Anthology. Wiley-Blackwell.
    _ Environmental Ethics: An Anthology_ brings together both classic and cutting-edge essays which have formed contemporary environmental ethics, ranging from the welfare of animals versus ecosystems to theories of the intrinsic value of nature.
     
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  9. Holmes Rolston, Kenosis and Nature.
    If one compares the general worldview of biology with that of theology, it first seems that there is only stark contrast. To move from Darwinian nature to Christian theology, one will have to change the sign of natural history, from selfish genes to suffering love. Theologians also hold that, in regeneration, humans with their sinful natures must be reformed to lives that are more altruistic, also requiring a change of sign. But the problem lies deeper; all of biological nature can (...)
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  10. Holmes Rolston (2004). Caring for Nature: From Fact to Value, From Respect to Reverence. Zygon 39 (2):277-302.
    . Despite the classical prohibition of moving from fact to value, encounter with the biodiversity and plenitude of being in evolutionary natural history moves us to respect life, even to reverence it. Darwinian accounts are value-laden and necessary for understanding life at the same time that Darwinian theory fails to provide sufficient cause for the historically developing diversity and increasing complexity on Earth. Earth is a providing ground; matter and energy on Earth support life, but distinctive to life is information (...)
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  11.  5
    Holmes Rolston, (1994). Environmental Ethics. Environmental Ethics 16 (2):219-224.
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  12.  67
    Holmes Rolston, (1981). Values in Nature. Environmental Ethics 3 (2):113-128.
    Nature is examined as a carrier of values. Despite problems of subjectivity and objectivity in value assignments, values are actualized in human relationships with nature, sometimes by (human) constructive activity depending on a natural support, sometimes by a sensitive, if an interpretive, appreciation of the characteristics of natural objects. Ten areas of values associated with nature are recognized: (1)economic value, (2) life support value, (3) recreational value, (4) scientific value, (5) aesthetic value, (6) life value, (7) diversity and unity values, (...)
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  13. Holmes Rolston (1989). Philosophy Gone Wild: Environmental Ethics. Prometheus Books.
     
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  14. Holmes Rolston (1986). Philosophy Gone Wild: Essays in Environmental Ethics. Prometheus Books.
     
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  15.  18
    Rolston (1992). Disvalues in Nature. The Monist 75 (2):250 - 278.
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  16.  95
    Holmes Rolston (1993). Rights and Responsibilities on the Home Planet. Zygon 28 (4):425-439.
  17. Holmes Rolston (1997). Nature, the Genesis of Value and Human Understanding. Environmental Values 6 (3):361-364.
     
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  18.  8
    Holmes Rolston (2006). Caring for Nature: What Science and Economics Can't Teach Us but Religion Can. Environmental Values 15 (3):307-313.
    Neither ecologists nor economists can teach us what we most need to know about nature: how to value it. The Hebrew prophets claimed that there can be no intelligent human ecology except as people learn to use land justly and charitably. Lands do not flow with milk and honey for all unless and until justice rolls down like waters. What kind of planet ought we humans wish to have? One we resourcefully manage for our benefits? Or one we hold in (...)
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  19. Holmes Rolston, Reviews and Author Responses.
    If you are puzzling whether to read this book, the main claim is right there in the clever title: The Open Secret. 'Ihe tensions — the contradictions, some will say — are built into the governing metaphor. An open..
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  20.  16
    Rolston (1979). Can and Ought We to Follow Nature? Environmental Ethics 1 (1):7-30.
    “Nature knows best” is reconsidered from an ecological perspective which suggests that we ought to follow nature. The phrase “follow nature” has many meanings. In an absolute law-of-nature sense, persons invariably and necessarily act in accordance with natural laws, and thus cannot but follow nature. In an artifactual sense, all deliberate human conduct is viewed as unnatural, and thus it is impossible to follow nature. As a result, the answer to the question, whether we can and ought to follow nature, (...)
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  21.  5
    Holmes Rolston (1987). Can the East Help the West to Value Nature? Philosophy East and West 37 (2):172 - 190.
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  22.  27
    Rolston (2007). Ecology. Journal of Catholic Social Thought 4 (2):293-312.
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  23.  6
    Rolston (1989). Andrew Brennan: Thinking About Nature. Environmental Ethics 11 (3):259-267.
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  24.  8
    Holmes Rolston (1998). Aesthetic Experience in Forests. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 56 (2):157 - 166.
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  25.  17
    Holmes Rolston (1994). Value in Nature and the Nature of Value. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 36:13-30.
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  26.  12
    Rolston (1981). Values in Nature. Environmental Ethics 3 (2):113-128.
    Nature is examined as a carrier of values. Despite problems of subjectivity and objectivity in value assignments, values are actualized in human relationships with nature, sometimes by (human) constructive activity depending on a natural support, sometimes by a sensitive, if an interpretive, appreciation of the characteristics of natural objects. Ten areas of values associated with nature are recognized: (1)economic value, (2) life support value, (3) recreational value, (4) scientific value, (5) aesthetic value, (6) life value, (7) diversity and unity values, (...)
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  27.  7
    Rolston (1982). Environmental Philosophy. Environmental Ethics 4 (1):69-74.
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  28.  10
    Holmes Rolston (2000). Aesthetics in the Swamps. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 43 (4):584-597.
  29. Holmes Rolston (forthcoming). Naturalizing Values: Organisms and Species. Environmental Ethics: Readings in Theory and Application. Wadsworth, Belmont, Ca.
     
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  30.  19
    Holmes Rolston (2005). F/Actual Knowing: Putting Facts and Values in Place. Ethics and the Environment 10 (2):137-174.
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  31.  17
    I. I. I. Rolston (1975). Is There an Ecological Ethic? Ethics 85 (2):93-109.
  32.  6
    Holmes Rolston (1994). Value in Nature and the Nature of Value: Holmes Rolston III. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 36:13-30.
    I offer myself as a nature guide, exploring for values. Many before us have got lost and we must look the world over. The unexamined life is not worth living; life in an unexamined world is not worthy living either. We miss too much of value.
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  33.  8
    Rolston (1987). Before It Is Too Late. Environmental Ethics 9 (3):269-271.
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  34. I. I. I. Rolston, By Holmes Rolston III.
    Both science and ethics are embedded in cultural traditions where truths are shared through education; both need competent critics educated within such traditions. Education in both ought to be directed although moral education demands levels of responsible agency that science education does not. Evolutionary science often carries an implicit or explicit understanding of who and what humans are, one which may not be coherent with the implicit or explicit human self-understanding in moral education.
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  35.  6
    Rolston (1985). Valuing Wildlands. Environmental Ethics 7 (1):23-48.
    Valuing wildlands is complex. (1) In a philosophically oriented analysis, I distinguish seven meaning levels of value, individual preference, market price, individual good, social preference, social good, organismic, and ecosystemic, and itemize twelve types of value carried by wildlands, economic, life support, recreational, scientific, genetic diversity, aesthetic, cultural syrubolization, historical, characterbuilding, therapeutic, religious, and intrinsic. (2) I criticize contingent valuation efforts to price these values. (3) I then propose an axiological model, which interrelates the multiple levels and types of value, (...)
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  36.  23
    Carl Mitcham & Jessica Smith Rolston (2013). Energy Constraints. Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (2):313-319.
    Building on research in anthropology and philosophy, one can make a distinction between type I and type II energy ethics as a framework for advancing public debate about energy. Type I holds energy production and use as a fundamental good and is grounded in the assumption that increases in energy production and consumption result in increases in human wellbeing. Conversely, type II questions the linear relationship between energy production and progress by examining questions of equity and human happiness. The type (...)
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  37.  4
    I. I. I. Rolston (1983). Values Gone Wild. Inquiry 26 (2):181 – 207.
    Wilderness valued as mere resource for human?interest satisfaction is challenged in favor of wilderness as a productive source, in which humans have roots, but which also yields wild neighbors and aliens with intrinsic value. Wild value is storied achievement in an evolutionary ecosystem, with instrumental and intrinsic, organismic and systemic values intermeshed. Survival value is reconsidered in this light. Changing cultural appreciations of values in wilderness can transform and relativize our judgments about appropriate conduct there. A final valued element in (...)
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  38.  34
    Robert Frodeman, Dale Jamieson, J. Baird Callicott, Stephen M. Gardiner, Lori Gruen, Irene J. Klaver, Eugene Hargrove, Ben A. Minteer, Bryan Norton, Clare Palmer, Holmes Rolston, Ricardo Rozzi, James P. Sterba, William M. Throop & Victoria Davion (2007). Commentary on the Future of Environmental Philosophy. Ethics and the Environment 12 (2):117 - 150.
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  39.  8
    Rolston (2002). Environmental Ethics in Antartica. Environmental Ethics 24 (2):115-134.
    The concerns of environmental ethics on other continents fail in Antarctica, which is without sustainable development, or ecosystems for a “land ethic,” or even familiar terrestrial fauna and flora. An Antarctic regime, developing politically, has been developing an ethics, underrunning the politics, remarkably exemplified in the Madrid Protocol, protecting “the intrinsic value of Antarctica.” Without inhabitants, claims of sovereignty are problematic. Antarctica is a continent for scientists and, more recently, tourists. Both focus on wild nature. Life is driven to extremes; (...)
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  40.  12
    Holmes Rolston, (2009). Ecology. Journal of Catholic Social Thought 4 (2):293-312.
  41. Holmes Rolston, Preaching on the Environment.
    covenant. " Behold I establish my covenant with you and your descendants after you, and with every living creature that is with you, the birds, the cattle, and every beast of the earth with you ". In modern terms, the covenant was both ecumenical and ecological. However, the ecological dimension is usually forgotten ; recalling it is worth a sermon.
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  42.  10
    Rolston (1999). Environment and the Moral Life. Environmental Ethics 21 (4):441-443.
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  43.  39
    Holmes Rolston (2007). Critical Issues in Future Environmental Ethics. Ethics and the Environment 12 (2):139-142.
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  44.  5
    Rolston (1986). The Natural Environment. Environmental Ethics 8 (1):91-93.
  45.  5
    Rolston (1985). The Fallacy of Wildlife Conservation. Environmental Ethics 7 (2):177-180.
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  46. Holmes Rolston (1989). Science and Religion: A Critical Survey. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 26 (3):185-185.
     
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  47.  3
    Holmes Rolston (2015). Rediscovering and Rethinking Leopold’s Green Fire. Environmental Ethics 37 (1):45-55.
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  48.  3
    Holmes Rolston, (1982). Environmental Philosophy. Environmental Ethics 4 (1):69-74.
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  49. Holmes Rolston, Preaching on the Wonder of Creation.
    A sermon on the wonders of creation? "But I don't know if I believe in creation any more, since I've been studying evolution in school," "Well, you do still think that Earth is a wonderland, don't you? Is there anything you have learned in your biology class that has talked you out of that?" The college student home for Easter puzzles a moment. "Not really. You know, I was wondering during the last lecture before I left. Wow! How is it (...)
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  50. Holmes Rolston, Informed Concern.
    thirsty, hot, tired, excited, sleepy. They suffer injury and lick their wounds. Sooner or later every biologist must concede that "care" is there. Call these "interests" or "preferences" or whatever; if "caring" is too loaded a term, then call these animal "concerns." Staying alive requires "self-defense." Living things have "needs." One of the hallmarks of life is that it can be "irritated." Organisms have to be "operational." Biology without "conservation" is death. Biology.
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