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Don Ross [138]W. D. Ross [116]Stephen David Ross [100]Lainie Friedman Ross [67]
James F. Ross [52]Alison Ross [46]G. R. T. Ross [44]David Ross [37]

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Profile: Alison F Ross (Monash University)
Profile: Jacob Joshua Ross
Profile: Stephanie Ross
Profile: James Ross (University of Pennsylvania)
Profile: Peter Ross (California State Polytechnic University, Pomona)
Profile: Andrew Ross (Queen's University)
Profile: Susan Ross (University of Southern Mississippi)
Profile: Stephen Ross (Pennsylvania State University)
Profile: Allison Ross
Profile: Sheryl Tuttle Ross (University of Wisconsin-La Crosse)
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  1. W. D. Ross (2002). The Right and the Good. Clarendon Press.
    The Right and the Good, a classic of twentieth-century philosophy by the eminent scholar Sir David Ross, is now presented in a new edition with a substantial introduction by Philip Stratton-Lake, a leading expert on Ross. Ross's book is the pinnacle of ethical intuitionism, which was the dominant moral theory in British philosophy for much of the nineteenth and early twentieth century. Intuitionism is now enjoying a considerable revival, and Stratton-Lake provides the context for a proper understanding of Ross's great (...)
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  2. Richard E. Nisbett & Lee Ross (1980). Human Inference: Strategies and Shortcomings of Social Judgment. Prentice-Hall.
  3. Thomas Nadelhoffer, Jason Shepard, Eddy Nahmias, Chandra Sripada & Lisa Ross (2014). The Free Will Inventory: Measuring Beliefs About Agency and Responsibility. Consciousness and Cognition 25 (1):27-41.
    In this paper, we present the results of the construction and validation of a new psychometric tool for measuring beliefs about free will and related concepts: The Free Will Inventory (FWI). In its final form, FWI is a 29-item instrument with two parts. Part 1 consists of three 5-item subscales designed to measure strength of belief in free will, determinism, and dualism. Part 2 consists of a series of fourteen statements designed to further explore the complex network of people’s associated (...)
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  4. Jacob Ross & Mark Schroeder (2014). Belief, Credence, and Pragmatic Encroachment1. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 88 (2):259-288.
    This paper compares two alternative explanations of pragmatic encroachment on knowledge (i.e., the claim that whether an agent knows that p can depend on pragmatic factors). After reviewing the evidence for such pragmatic encroachment, we ask how it is best explained, assuming it obtains. Several authors have recently argued that the best explanation is provided by a particular account of belief, which we call pragmatic credal reductivism. On this view, what it is for an agent to believe a proposition is (...)
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  5. Angus Ross (1986). Why Do We Believe What We Are Told? Ratio (1):69-88.
    It is argued that reliance on the testimony of others cannot be viewed as reliance on a kind of evidence. Speech being essentially voluntary, the speaker cannot see his own choice of words as evidence of their truth, and so cannot honestly offer them to others as such. Rather, in taking responsibility for the truth of what he says, the speaker offers a guarantee or assurance of its truth, and in believing him the hearer accepts this assurance. I argue that, (...)
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  6. G. R. T. Ross (1912). Notes. Mind 21 (81):147-148.
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  7.  65
    Lauren N. Ross, Causal Control: A Rationale for Causal Selection.
    Causal selection has to do with the distinction we make between background conditions and “the” true cause or causes of some outcome of interest. A longstanding consensus in philosophy views causal selection as lacking any objective rationale and as guided, instead, by arbitrary, pragmatic, and non-scientific considerations. I argue against this position in the context of causal selection for disease traits. In this domain, causes are selected on the basis of the type of causal control they exhibit over a disease (...)
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  8.  2
    Don Ross (2007). Economic Theory and Cognitive Science: Microexplanation. A Bradford Book.
    In this study, Don Ross explores the relationship of economics to other branches of behavioral science, asking, in the course of his analysis, under what interpretation economics is a sound empirical science. The book explores the relationships between economic theory and the theoretical foundations of related disciplines that are relevant to the day-to-day work of economics -- the cognitive and behavioral sciences. It asks whether the increasingly sophisticated techniques of microeconomic analysis have revealed any deep empirical regularities -- whether technical (...)
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  9.  16
    Jacob Ross & Mark Schroeder (2016). On Losing Disagreements: Spencer’s Attitudinal Relativism. Mind 125 (498):541-551.
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  10.  11
    Gordon Pennycook, Robert M. Ross, Derek J. Koehler & Jonathan A. Fugelsang (2016). Atheists and Agnostics Are More Reflective Than Religious Believers: Four Empirical Studies and a Meta-Analysis. PLoS ONE 11 (4):e0153039.
    Individual differences in the mere willingness to think analytically has been shown to predict religious disbelief. Recently, however, it has been argued that analytic thinkers are not actually less religious; rather, the putative association may be a result of religiosity typically being measured after analytic thinking (an order effect). In light of this possibility, we report four studies in which a negative correlation between religious belief and performance on analytic thinking measures is found when religious belief is measured in a (...)
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  11.  5
    Ellen Clayton, Laurence Mccullough, Leslie Biesecker, Steven Joffe & Lainie Ross (2014). Addressing the Ethical Challenges in Genetic Testing and Sequencing of Children. American Journal of Bioethics 14 (3):3-9.
    American Academy of Pediatrics and American College of Medical Genetics recently provided two recommendations about predictive genetic testing of children. The Clinical Sequencing Exploratory Research Consortium's Pediatrics Working Group compared these recommendations, focusing on operational and ethical issues specific to decision making for children. Content analysis of the statements addresses two issues: how these recommendations characterize and analyze locus of decision making, as well as the risks and benefits of testing, and whether the guidelines conflict or come to different but (...)
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  12.  10
    Alison Ross, Spinoza in Paris - The French Evaluation Machine.
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  13. Stephanie Y. Chen, Brian H. Ross & Gregory L. Murphy (2014). Implicit and Explicit Processes in Category-Based Induction: Is Induction Best When We Don’T Think? Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 143 (1):227-246.
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  14. Takako Fujioka, Brian C. Fidali & Bernhard Ross (2014). Neural Correlates of Intentional Switching From Ternary to Binary Meter in a Musical Hemiola Pattern. Frontiers in Psychology 5.
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  15. M. N. O’Connell, A. Barczak, D. Ross, T. McGinnis, C. E. Schroeder & P. Lakatos (2015). Multi-Scale Entrainment of Coupled Neuronal Oscillations in Primary Auditory Cortex. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  16. Jessica Marie Ross & Ramesh Balasubramaniam (2014). Physical and Neural Entrainment to Rhythm: Human Sensorimotor Coordination Across Tasks and Effector Systems. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
  17. Jacob Ross & Mark Schroeder (2013). Reversibility or Disagreement. Mind 122 (485):43-84.
    The phenomenon of disagreement has recently been brought into focus by the debate between contextualists and relativist invariantists about epistemic expressions such as ‘might’, ‘probably’, indicative conditionals, and the deontic ‘ought’. Against the orthodox contextualist view, it has been argued that an invariantist account can better explain apparent disagreements across contexts by appeal to the incompatibility of the propositions expressed in those contexts. This paper introduces an important and underappreciated phenomenon associated with epistemic expressions — a phenomenon that we call (...)
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  18. Allison Ross & Nafsika Athanassoulis (2010). The Social Nature of Engineering and its Implications for Risk Taking. Science and Engineering Ethics 16 (1):147-168.
    Making decisions with an, often significant, element of risk seems to be an integral part of many of the projects of the diverse profession of engineering. Whether it be decisions about the design of products, manufacturing processes, public works, or developing technological solutions to environmental, social and global problems, risk taking seems inherent to the profession. Despite this, little attention has been paid to the topic and specifically to how our understanding of engineering as a distinctive profession might affect how (...)
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  19. S. D. Ross (1982). The Limits of Sexuality. Philosophy and Social Criticism 9 (3-4):319-336.
  20.  8
    Lauren N. Ross & James Woodward, Koch’s Postulates: An Interventionist Perspective.
    We argue that Koch’s postulates are best understood within an interventionist account of causation, in the sense described in Woodward. We show how this treatment helps to resolve interpretive puzzles associated with Koch’s work and how it clarifies the different roles the postulates play in providing useful, yet not universal criteria for disease causation. Our paper is an effort at rational reconstruction; we attempt to show how Koch’s postulates and reasoning make sense and are normatively justified within an interventionist framework (...)
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  21. Lainie Friedman Ross (2010). Mandatory Versus Voluntary Consent for Newborn Screening? Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 20 (4):299-328.
    Virtually every infant in the United States (U.S.) undergoes a heel stick within the first week of life to test for a variety of metabolic, endocrine, and hematological conditions as part of state-run universal newborn screening (NBS) programs. In the U.S., NBS began in the 1960s for phenylketonuria (PKU), a metabolic condition that causes intellectual disability if left untreated. I review the history of how NBS came to be a mandatory public health program that did not require parental consent1 and (...)
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  22. M. L., David Morrison, W. McD, G. R. T. Ross, A. E. Taylor, P. E. Winter, B. L., B. Russell, Louis Brehaut, G. Galloway, Henry Wodehouse, M. J. & C. A. F. Rhys Davids (1909). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 18 (70):285-309.
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  23. Ian Simpson Ross (2010). The Life of Adam Smith. OUP Oxford.
    This new edition of The Life of Adam Smith remains the only book to give a full account of Smith's life whilst also placing his work into the context of his life and times.
     
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  24. Geo Galloway, David Morrison, W. Leslie MacKenzie, F. C. S. Schiller, John Sime, T. B., John Edgar, W. McD, G. R. T. Ross, R. F. A. Hoernle, A. R. Brown & B. Russell (1906). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 15 (58):261-280.
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  25. Jamie P. Ross (2010). “The Obvious Invisibility of the Relationship Between Technology and Social Values.”. International Journal of Science in Society, Vol. 2, No.1, P. 51-62, CG Publisher. 2010 2 (1):51-62.
    Abstract -/- “The Obvious Invisibility of the Relationship Between Technology and Social Values” -/- We all too often assume that technology is the product of objective scientific research. And, we assume that technology’s moral value lies in only the moral character of its user. Yet, in order to objectify technology in a manner that removes it from a moral realm, we rely on the assumption that technology is value neutral, i.e., it is independent of all contexts other than the context (...)
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  26.  94
    Art Ross (forthcoming). Luke 15:1–10. Interpretation 61 (4):422-424.
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  27.  51
    Stephanie Ross (2008). Humean Critics: Real or Ideal? British Journal of Aesthetics 48 (1):20-28.
    This paper attempts a rational reconstruction of the Humean notion of an ideal critic. Claiming that the traits of practice and comparison can only arise through the gradual accumulation of experience, I argue that Humean critics are real, not ideal. After discussing the nature of perfection and the relation of delicacy to the other Human traits, I propose two supplements to Hume's list: imaginative fluency and emotional responsiveness. I close by examining a trio of challenges to my view and supporting (...)
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  28. Peter W. Ross (2012). Perceived Colors and Perceived Locations: A Problem for Color Subjectivism. American Philosophical Quarterly 49 (2):125-138.
    Color subjectivists claim that, despite appearances to the contrary, the world external to the mind is colorless. However, in giving an account of color perception, subjectivists about the nature of perceived color must address the nature of perceived spatial location as well. The argument here will be that subjectivists’ problems with coordinating the metaphysics of perceived color and perceived location render color perception implausibly mysterious. Consequently, some version of color realism, the view that colors are (physical, dispositional, functional, sui generis, (...)
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  29. Jacob Ross (2009). How to Be a Cognitivist About Practical Reason. Oxford Studies in Metaethics 4:243-281.
  30. Jamie P. Ross (2008). “White Privilege and the Color of Fear.” Chapter in Lessons From The Color of Fear. In Victor Lee Lewis & Hugh Vasquez (eds.), Lessons from The Color of Fear Field Reports. Using the Color of Fear in the Classroom. Speak Out - The Institute for Democratic Education and Cultural
  31.  51
    Daniel Ross (2009). Review Essay: A Secular Age. Thesis Eleven 99 (1):112-121.
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  32. Peter W. Ross (2008). Common Sense About Qualities and Senses. Philosophical Studies 138 (3):299 - 316.
    There has been some recent optimism that addressing the question of how we distinguish sensory modalities will help us consider whether there are limits on a scientific understanding of perceptual states. For example, Block has suggested that the way we distinguish sensory modalities indicates that perceptual states have qualia which at least resist scientific characterization. At another extreme, Keeley argues that our common-sense way of distinguishing the senses in terms of qualitative properties is misguided, and offers a scientific eliminativism about (...)
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  33. Jacob Ross (2010). Sleeping Beauty, Countable Additivity, and Rational Dilemmas. Philosophical Review 119 (4):411 - 447.
    Currently, the most popular views about how to update de se or self-locating beliefs entail the one-third solution to the Sleeping Beauty problem.2 Another widely held view is that an agent‘s credences should be countably additive.3 In what follows, I will argue that there is a deep tension between these two positions. For the assumptions that underlie the one-third solution to the Sleeping Beauty problem entail a more general principle, which I call the Generalized Thirder Principle, and there are situations (...)
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  34.  6
    René Descartes, Elizabeth Sanderson Haldane & G. R. T. Ross (1931). The Philosophical Works of Descartes. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  35.  29
    William T. Ross & Diana C. Robertson (2003). A Typology of Situational Factors: Impact on Salesperson Decision-Making About Ethical Issues. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 46 (3):213 - 234.
    We explore two dimensions of situational factors expected to influence decision-making about ethical issues among sales representatives – universal vs. particular and direct vs. indirect. We argue that these distinctions are important theoretically, methodologically, and managerially. We test our hypotheses by means of a survey of 252 sales representatives. Our results confirm that considering universal and particular and direct and indirect situational factors contributes to our understanding of decision-making about ethical issues within a sales context, specifically willingness to engage in (...)
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  36. G. R. T. Ross (1903). The Disjunctive Judgment. Mind 12 (48):489-501.
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  37. Peter W. Ross (2016). Primary and Secondary Qualties. In Mohan Matthen (ed.), Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Perception. Oxford University Press 405-421.
    The understanding of the primary-secondary quality distinction has shifted focus from the mechanical philosophers’ proposal of primary qualities as explanatorily fundamental to current theorists’ proposal of secondary qualities as metaphysically perceiver dependent. The chapter critically examines this shift and current arguments to uphold the primary-secondary quality distinction on the basis of the perceiver dependence of color; one focus of the discussion is the role of qualia in these arguments. It then describes and criticizes reasons for characterizing color, smell, taste, sound, (...)
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  38. Jacob Ross, Acceptance and Practical Reason.
    What theory should we accept from the practical point of view, or accept as a basis for guiding our actions, if we don’t know which theory is true, and if there are too many plausible alternative theories for us to take them all into consideration? This question is the theme of the first three parts of this dissertation. I argue that the problem of theory acceptance, so understood, is a problem of practical rationality, and hence that the appropriate grounds for (...)
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  39.  90
    N. Athanassoulis & A. Ross (2010). A Virtue Ethical Account of Making Decisions About Risk. Journal of Risk Research 13 (2):217.
    Abstract -/- Most discussions of risk are developed in broadly consequentialist terms, focusing on the outcomes of risks as such. This paper will provide an alternative account of risk from a virtue ethical perspective, shifting the focus to the decision to take the risk. Making ethical decisions about risk is, we will argue, not fundamentally about the actual chain of events that the decision sets in process, but about the reasonableness of the decision to take the risk in the first (...)
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  40.  47
    J. B. Baillie, John Edgar, A. J. Jenkinson, G. R. T. Ross, W. R. Scott, T. B., David Morrison & R. A. Duff (1904). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 13 (51):425-438.
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  41.  3
    Peter Richerson, Ryan Baldini, Adrian Bell, Kathryn Demps, Karl Frost, Vicken Hillis, Sarah Mathew, Emily Newton, Nicole Narr, Lesley Newson, Cody Ross, Paul Smaldino, Timothy Waring & Matthew Zefferman (2014). Cultural Group Selection Plays an Essential Role in Explaining Human Cooperation: A Sketch of the Evidence. Behavioral and Brain Sciences:1-71.
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  42. Peter W. Ross & Dale Turner (2013). Problems of Existence in Philosophy and Science. Synthese 190:4239-4259.
    We initially characterize what we’ll call existence problems as problems where there is evidence that a putative entity exists and this evidence is not easily dismissed; however, the evidence is not adequate to justify the claim that the entity exists, and in particular the entity hasn’t been detected. The putative entity is elusive. We then offer a strategy for determining whether an existence problem is philosophical or scientific. According to this strategy existence problems are characterized in terms of causal roles, (...)
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  43.  11
    Norbert Ross, Jeffrey T. Shenton, Werner Hertzog & Mike Kohut (2015). Language, Culture and Spatial Cognition: Bringing Anthropology to the Table. Baltic International Yearbook of Cognition, Logic and Communication 10 (1):1-18.
    Languages vary in their semantic partitioning of the world. This has led to speculation that language might shape basic cognitive processes. Spatial cognition has been an area of research in which linguistic relativity – the effect of language on thought – has both been proposed and rejected. Prior studies have been inconclusive, lacking experimental rigor or appropriate research design. Lacking detailed ethnographic knowledge as well as failing to pay attention to intralanguage variations, these studies often fall short of defining an (...)
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  44. Lainie Friedman Ross (2001). Transplantation Ethics (Review). Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 44 (4):623-628.
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  45.  16
    Lauren N. Ross (2015). Dynamical Models and Explanation in Neuroscience. Philosophy of Science 81 (1):32-54.
    Kaplan and Craver claim that all explanations in neuroscience appeal to mechanisms. They extend this view to the use of mathematical models in neuroscience and propose a constraint such models must meet in order to be explanatory. I analyze a mathematical model used to provide explanations in dynamical systems neuroscience and indicate how this explanation cannot be accommodated by the mechanist framework. I argue that this explanation is well characterized by Batterman’s account of minimal model explanations and that it demonstrates (...)
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  46.  3
    Lee Ross (2012). Reflections on Biased Assimilation and Belief Polarization. Critical Review 24 (2):233-245.
    Where Taber and Lodge view belief polarization to indicate a ?partisan motivation,? Lord et al. (1979) believed it to be consistent with a desire for accuracy: A ?weak? study articulating an opposing viewpoint might simply sharpen participants' initial belief of the wisdom of their prior beliefs. This polarization, Taber and Lodge show, correlates with political sophistication: The more partisan a participant, the more time spent reading the opinions of the other side?in order to critically refute them. Taber and Lodge attribute (...)
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  47. Jacob Ross (2006). Rejecting Ethical Deflationism. Ethics 116 (4):742-768.
    One of the perennial challenges of ethical theory has been to provide an answer to a number of views that appear to undermine the importance of ethical questions. We may refer to such views collectively as “deflationary ethical theories.” These include theories, such as nihilism, according to which no action is better than any other, as well as relativistic theories according to which no ethical theory is better than any other. In this article I present a new response to such (...)
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  48. Don Ross & James Ladyman (2010). The Alleged Coupling-Constitution Fallacy and the Mature Sciences. In Richard Menary (ed.), The Extended Mind. MIT Press
     
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  49. Jacob Ross (forthcoming). Actualism, Possibilism, and Beyond. Oxford Studies in Normative Ethics.
    How is what an agent ought to do related to what an agent ought to prefer that she does? More precisely, suppose we know what an agent’s preference ordering ought to be over the prospects of performing the various courses of action open to her. Can we infer from this information how she ought to act, and if so, how can we infer it? One view (which, for convenience, I will call ‘actualism’) is that an agent ought to  just (...)
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  50.  35
    Don Ross (2008). Two Styles of Neuroeconomics. Economics and Philosophy 24 (3):473-483.
    I distinguish between two styles of research that are both called . Neurocellular economics (NE) uses the modelling techniques and mathematics of economics to model relatively encapsulated functional parts of brains. This approach rests upon the fact that brains are, like markets, massively distributed information-processing networks over which executive systems can exert only limited and imperfect governance. Harrison's (2008) deepest criticisms of neuroeconomics do not apply to NE. However, the more famous style of neuroeconomics is behavioural economics in the scanner. (...)
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