1171 found
Sort by:
Disambiguations:
Don Ross [121]Stephen David Ross [94]W. D. Ross [74]Lainie Friedman Ross [54]
James F. Ross [43]Alison Ross [35]Steven Ross [27]David Ross [26]

Not all matches are shown. Search with initial or firstname to single out others.

See also:
Profile: Jacob Joshua Ross
Profile: Alison F Ross (Monash University)
Profile: Stephanie Ross
Profile: James Ross (University of Pennsylvania)
Profile: Peter Ross (California State Polytechnic University, Pomona)
Profile: Stephen Ross (Pennsylvania State University)
Profile: Angus Ross (University of East Anglia)
Profile: Allison Ross
Profile: Jamie P. Ross (Portland State University)
Profile: Jessica Ross (Chapman University)
Other users were found but are not shown.
  1. Jean-Philippe Deranty & Alison Ross, Jacques Ranciere and the Contemporary Scene: The Evidence of Equality and the Practice of Writing.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Mary Jo Nissen, James L. Ross, Daniel B. Willingham, Thomas B. Mackenzie & Daniel L. Schacter (unknown). .
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Alison Ross, Aesthetics (Continental).
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Alison Ross, Equality in the Romantic Art Form: The Hegelian Background to Jaques Ranciére's 'Aesthetic Revolution'.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Don Ross, Do Evolutionary Accounts of Morality Imply Quiet Policies?
    There are many general economic policies I favour such that I would feel significantly ashamed were I to succumb to bribery, or to institutional pressure short of physical threat, to publicly support their opposites. Here are a few of these policies: (1) Rich countries should not impose trade barriers, including subsidies for their own producers, against imports from poor countries. (2) Leaders of poor countries should be regarded as irresponsible when they imply to their people that their economic difficulties arise (...)
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Don Ross, Reply to Hands: On the Robbins-Samuelson Argument Pattern.
    The paper replies to Wade Hands’s recent criticism of one part of my 2005 book, Economic Theory and Cognitive Science: Microexplanation (ETCS). Hands argues that my association of my view of the foundations of microeconomics with aspects of the thought of Lionel Robbins and Paul Samuelson is gratuitous and historically misleading. I argue in turn that Hands’s general criticism rests on his ignoring the fact that my treatment of both Robbins and Samuelson is explicitly critical. On Robbins, I argue that (...)
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Don Ross, Zero-Sum (Constant Sum) _or Are _Interests Partially Aligned?
    If one player’s gain is exactly equivalent to another’s loss, the game is said to be zero-sum. For example, football: every improvement of position for one team is an exactly corresponding deterioration for the other team. On the other hand, a buyer and a supplier haggling over a price is not a zero-sum game, since the parties hope to mutually gain.
    No categories
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. George MacDonald Ross, Leibniz.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. James F. Ross, Reason and Reliance: Adjusted Prospects for Natural Theology.
    This paper is as much about knowledge in general, as it is about the particular inquiry that occasions it.
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. David Spurrett, Jacques Rousseau & Don Ross, Reward Discounting and Severity of Disordered Gambling in a South African Population.
    People differ in the extent to which they discount the values of future rewards. Behavioural economists measure these differences in terms of functions that describe rates of reduced valuation in the future – temporal discounting – as these vary with time. They measure differences in preference for risk – differing rates of probability discounting – in terms of similar functions that describe reduced valuation of rewards as the probability of their delivery falls. So-called ‘impulsive’ people, including people disposed to addiction, (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Don Ross, Author's Personal Copy.
    Addiction may or may not be a highly prevalent condition, but the concept of addiction is undeniably ubiquitous. From the people who cheerfully and publicly announce their addiction to coffee, or chocolate, or shopping, to those who ruefully and perhaps only in very special settings admit their addiction to alcohol or drugs, ‘‘addiction” is an oft-invoked explanatory frame for the presentation and characterization of individual behavior. Lately, it has even been applied to the behavior of super-personal entities, as in America’s (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Don Ross, Economics, Cognitive Science and Social Cognition.
    I discuss the role of economics in the study of social cognition. A currently popular view is that microeconomics should collapse into psychology partly because cognitive science has shown that valuation is constitutively social, whereas non-psychological economics insists that it is not. In the paper I resist this view, partly by reference to the relevant history of economic theory, and partly by reference to an alternative model of the way in which that theory complements, without reducing to, psychological accounts of (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Don Ross, Economic Theory, Anti-Economics, and Political Ideology.
    Economics is the only established discipline that is regularly charged not just with including ideologically motivated research programs and hypotheses, but with actually being (at least in its institutionalized mainstream form) an ideology. As Coleman (2002) documents, this charge has followed economics since its modern inception as ‘political economy’ in the eighteenth century. There is a veritable tradition of what Coleman calls ‘anti-economics’, most famously populated by people such as Ruskin and Carlyle, and extending in the contemporary environment to include (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Don Ross, In Defense of Standard Welfare Measurement.
    This paper critically discusses Amartya Sen’s case for broadening the basket of wellbeing indicators in development policy beyond income and consumption expenditure. I first argue that, contrary to what Sen has suggested, the theoretical and practical motivations that he gives for this do not form a mutually complementary set. In the second, policy-focused, part of the paper I present problems Sen’s approach to measurement raises in the context of a case study from rural South Africa. I conclude by suggesting that (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Don Ross, Integrating the Dynamics of Multi-Level Economic Agency.
    Three recent book-length studies in the philosophy of economics (Mirowski 2002, Davis 2003, Ross 2005) have drawn attention to the fact that mainstream economic theory has consistently avoided commitment to any particular model of the person. This is the most significant respect in which economics has kept aloof from part of psychology. The widespread belief, on the other hand, that economists’ attentiveness to the psychology of choice and decision had to wait for the Allais challenge and then for Kahneman and (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Don Ross, 'Millennium Plus' Community Development for South Africa.
    Of crucial importance to all parts of the transport services and materials sector in South Africa is the way in which the Government chooses to implement its ambitious plans to reinvest in the country’s basic infrastructure. How will it navigate competing demands from urban and rural environments, given the divergent economics that describe them? How will it balance the goals of poverty fighting, skills empowerment, and keeping SA internationally competitive, as it considers infrastructure project options?
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Don Ross, Naturalism: The Place of Society in Nature.
    ‘Naturalism’ about the ontology of society can most blandly be characterized as the belief that social phenomena are among the class of natural phenomena. Contemporary scholars are apt to regard this thesis as bland because its denial seems quaint at best, if not outright unhinged, after a century and a half of development in the social sciences. There has, however, been a powerful tradition in (at least) Western culture that has understood the ‘artificial’ as a primary contrast class with the (...)
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Don Ross, Robbins, Positivism and the Demarcation of Economics From Psychology.
    This paper argues that the most common reading of Robbins’s Essay on the Nature and Significance of Economic Science in the methodology literature, according to which it was an historical foil for subsequent positivist-empiricist ideas, underestimates its contemporary relevance. In light of recent scholarship on 1930s positivism in philosophy, Robbins’s Essay is better interpreted as representing an attitude I call ‘broad positivism’, which remains a live option in contemporary philosophy of science. In consequence, the basis of Robbins’s preference for clear (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Don Ross, South Africa!S Fruit Processing Industry: Competitiveness Factors and the Case for Sector-Specific Industrial Policy Measures.
    The aim of this report is to consider feasible conditions under which South Africa!!" processed (e.g., canned and other packaged) fruit industry would be internationally competitive and a profitable site of investment, and therefore able to resume a pattern of growth from which it departed in the early part of the present decade. This is in service of the wider aim of identifying, in a subsequent phase of the project, appropriate industrial policy measures which Government might put in place to (...)
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Don Ross, South African Road Surfacing Policy, International Oil Price Changes, and the Shadow Pricing of Costs and Benefits.
    Writing in the Business Day on 2 October 2007, economics journalist Hilary Joffe notes that “it was not long ago that there was a famine of infrastructure investment [in South Africa]; now there’s a feast, with each new week bringing reports of new projects and new, much higher estimates of the totals to be spent in years to come.” Joffe expresses enthusiasm about this, for reasons with which we agree: The infrastructure feast has already helped to raise SA’s investment ratio (...)
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Don Ross, The Economic Agent: Not Human, but Important.
    Critics of mainstream economics typically rest important weight on the differences between people and the 'agents' that populate economic theory and economic models. Hollis and Nell (1975) is both representative of and ancestral to many more recent variations on the theme. Lately, the upgraded status of behavioral economics (BE) within the discipline's mainstream has encouraged a number of writers to use revolutionary rhetoric in promotion of a 'paradigm shift' that includes the rejection of 'rational economic man' (Ormerod 1994, Heilbroner and (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Don Ross, The Wto, Unfair Trade and Development.
    There may not be many points of consensus over what best promotes economic development, but here is one that has formed over the past decade: the institutional context matters a lot. This represents the single greatest shift in economic thinking about development since World War II, for there once was an almost equally clear consensus that institutions..
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Dr Ross, EC 450 Economics, Institutions and Law.
    In your simulation you will devise measures to try to relieve the severity of the current global recession and speed the re-emergence of global growth. Each of you will be assigned the identity of an actual person with a specific institutional role. You will be required to undertake web-based research on that person, that person’s institution, and the utility function the person would be expected to behave in accordance with, given their role.
    No categories
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Dr Ross, Guidelines for Debates.
    For the book that forms the basis for your debate, you’ve either been assigned to defend the thesis of the lead article or its antithesis. The thesis and antithesis are one another’s logical opposites – their contradictions. Consult the course webpage area to read the precise proposition you’re responsible for defending.
    No categories
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Dr Don Ross, Dross1@Uab.Edu.
    Book list for independent research component Aizenman, J., and Pinto, B. (eds.), Managing Economic Volatility and Crises: A Practitioner’s Guide. Cambridge U.P. 978-0521855242..
    No categories
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Dr Don Ross, PHL 115 Contemporary Moral Issues.
    To be uninterested in an issue is to not care about it one way or the other. To be disinterested in an issue is to devote attention to deciding on it, but to do so in a way that tries to discount one’s personal stake in the outcome.
    No categories
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Jacob Ross, Acceptance and Practical Reason.
    What theory should we accept from the practical point of view, or accept as a basis for guiding our actions, if we don’t know which theory is true, and if there are too many plausible alternative theories for us to take them all into consideration? This question is the theme of the first three parts of this dissertation. I argue that the problem of theory acceptance, so understood, is a problem of practical rationality, and hence that the appropriate grounds for (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Jacob Ross, Countable Additivity, Dutch Books, and the Sleeping Beauty Problem.
    Currently, it appears that the most widely accepted solution to the Sleeping Beauty problem is the one-third solution. Another widely held view is that an agent’s credences should be countably additive. In what follows, I will argue that these two views are incompatible, since the principles that underlie the one-third solution are inconsistent with the principle of Countable Additivity (hereafter, CA). I will then argue that this incompatibility is a serious problems for thirders, since it undermines one of the central (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Jacob Ross, Personal and Impersonal Obligation.
    How are claims about what people ought to do related to claims about what ought to be the case? That is, how are claims about of personal obligation, of the form s ought to ?, related to claims about impersonal obligation, of the form it ought to be the case that p? Many philosophers have held that the former type of claim can be reduced to the latter. In particular, they have held a view known as the Meinong-Chisholm Thesis, which, (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Jacob Ross, Personal Identity and the Irrelevance of Self-Interest.
    Self-interest is widely regarded as an important, if not as the only, source of reasons for action, and hence it is widely held that one can rationally give special weight to one’s self-interest in deciding how to act. In what follows, I will argue against this view. I will do so by following the lead of Derek Parfit, and considering cases in which personal identity appears to break down. My argument will differ from Parfit’s, however, in that it will have (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Jacob Ross, Rationality, Normativity, and Commitment.
    Is rationality normative, in the sense that we ought to be rational, in our actions and attitudes? Recently, the claim that rationality is normative has faced several challenges. In this paper, I will take up these challenges, and aim to vindicate the normativity of rationality in the face of them. I will begin, in part 1, by outlining these challenges, and then discussing, and criticizing, some that have been offered to them in the literature. Then, in part 2, I will (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Jacob Ross, S K B C ?
    Parfit argues that a form of rule consequentialism can be derived from the most plausible formulation of the fundamental principle of Kantian ethics. And so he concludes that Kantians should be consequentialists. I argue that we have good reason to reject two of the auxiliary premises that figure in Parfit’s derivation of rule consequentialism from Kantianism..
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. James F. Ross, Analogy.
    analogy, the similarity along with difference, among meanings, among sorts of thinking, and among realities. Analogy theory ori­ginated with *Aristotle in its three main parts: analogy of meaning, analogous thinking, and analogy of being. There were some ante­cedents in *Plato, where the names of Forms and of participating things are the same but differ in meaning, and the notion of ‘being’ is said to differ with what we are talking about, for example Forms versus physical things (Sophist). Systematic use of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. James F. Ross, Duns Scotus on Natural Theology.
    Scotus’ natural theology has distinctive claims: (i) that we can reason demonstratively to the necessary existence and nature of God from what is actually so; but not from imagined situations, or from conceivability-to-us; rather, only from the possibility logically required for what we know actually to be so; (ii) that there is a univocal transcendental notion of being; (iii) that there are disjunctive transcendental notions that apply exclusively to everything, like ‘contingent/necessary,’ and such that the inferior cannot have a case (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. James F. Ross, Real Freedom.
    To avoid the deadends, I redeploy[52] the idea that integral human freedom (and understanding) has two modes. One is "natural" and the other "supernatural," though dividing the matter that way supposes the "natural" is the residue after the integrated whole is lost, because the supernatural[53] contains the natural "eminently" the way olympic winning routines envelop the qualifying skills.[54] In my account, humans were never "merely" objects in nature at all-- that is, objects, alongside stones and tigers and dinosaurs, that are (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. James F. Ross, Rational Reliance.
    The notion of rational certainty[1] had developed a long way in four decades. Many now recognize that even to do science we characteristically claim rational certainty where we lack supporting proof of our own, have not engaged in some balancing of evidence, and have not even undertaken any articulate inquiry. Many further recognize that rational reliance is notably voluntary[2]and that our feelings, especially refined feelings, have indispensable roles in determining our willing reliances and in sustaining them. Scientists, and ordinary people, (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. James F. Ross, Semantic Contagion.
    There are reasons of principle limiting what lexical fields can explain. As will emerge, they are not just the limitations that have encouraged "frame" semantics, or an emphasis on the "belief elements of meaning" peculiar to the lexicon of a given language, but reasons concerned with the combinatorial adaptation of words in all languages. An example of combinatorial adaptation, which I call "semantic contagion," is the italicized pair: "look down \on art; look down \at the floor".
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. James F. Ross, The Fate of the Analysts: Aristotle's Revenge*: Software Everywhere.
    SUMMARY: If you think of analytic philosophy as disciplined argumentation, but with distinctive doctrinal commitments [to: positivism, logical atomism, ideal languages, verificationism, physicalistic reductionism, materialism, functionalism, connectivism, computational accounts of perception, and inductive accounts of language learning], then THAT analytic philosophy is fast going the way of acid rock and the plastic LP. Not because the method has betrayed the doctrines. Rather, the doctrines disintegrate under the method.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. James F. Ross, The Summa Theologica of St Thomas Aquinas Christian Wisdom Explained Philosophically.
    This is more than a philosophical work. It is a systematic exposition of a whole Christian conception of the world within philosophical principles and concepts.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Jamie P. Ross, Feminists Who Do: Bridging Insight to Practice in Comprehensive Women’s Health Care.
    A qualitative and quantitative understanding of disease variables in relation to local understandings and values is an important dimension that broadens traditional evidence-based medicine (EBM) and is necessary in order to navigate the social perspectives of policymakers. There are dimensions of this research that share the values and practices of feminist research. This paper offers an epistemological analysis of theory and practice that can provide more effective outcomes in women’s health. PATH (Policy Advisory Towards Health) for women, bridges the knowledge (...)
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Jamie P. Ross, The Indeterminacy of Genes: The Dilemma of Difference in Medicine and Health Care.
    John Dewey wrote that the problems of philosophy were not problems of reality but rather problems of men. He suggested that philosophical dichotomies are problems to overcome. In this paper, I make an effort to help us move past the race/gene dichotomy, where on one hand we claim biological and inherent human characteristics of race and on the other hand we identify racial differences as having no inherent basis in biology or genetics. The swing between false beliefs of inherent racial (...)
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Kelley Ross, Ayn Rand (1905-1982).
    The Fountainhead and Atlas Shrugged are still best selling introductions to the ideas of personal freedom and of the free market. As literature they may have drawbacks, but they are compelling "reads," which is certainly what Rand would have wanted. Rand's passionate and moralistic tone, while off-putting to many, is nevertheless probably a real part of her appeal and is no less than an equal and opposite reaction to the self-righteousness that is still characteristic of leftist rhetoric. Few writers convey (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Kelley Ross, Arthur Schopenhauer (1788-1860).
    Certainly one of the greatest philosophers of the 19th century, Schopenhauer seems to have had more impact on literature (e.g. Thomas Mann) and on people in general than on academic philosophy. Perhaps that is because, first, he wrote very well, simply and intelligibly (unusual, we might say, for a German philosopher, and unusual now for any philosopher), second, he was the first Western philosopher to have access to translations of philosophical material from India, both Vedic and Buddhist, by which he (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Kelley Ross, By John R. Searle.
    The title of The Rediscovery of the Mind suggests the question "When was the mind lost?" Since most people may not be aware that it ever was lost, we must also then ask "Who lost it?" It was lost, of course, only by philosophers, by certain philosophers. This passed unnoticed by society at large. The "rediscovery" is also likely to pass unnoticed. But has the mind been rediscovered by the same philosophers who "lost" it? Probably not. John Searle is an (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Kelley Ross, Carl Gustav Jung (1875-1961).
    Amid all the talk about the "Collective Unconscious" and other sexy issues, most readers are likely to miss the fact that C.G. Jung was a good Kantian. His famous theory of Synchronicity, "an acausal connecting principle," is based on Kant's distinction between phenomena and things-in-themselves and on Kant's theory that causality will not operate among thing-in-themselves the way it does in phenomena. Thus, Kant could allow for free will (unconditioned causes) among things-in-themselves, as Jung allows for synchronicity (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Kelley Ross, Chicago Schools: Economics, Religion, Philosophy, & Law.
    The references to "Chicago" (meaning, of course, the University of Chicago) Schools of economics and history of religion, and the quotation of Allan Bloom, who may be considered to belong to a Chicago school of philosophy, may suggest a general endorsement of "Chicago" ideas. This is not the case.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Kelley Ross, Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900).
    "...Let us face facts: the people have triumphed -- or the slaves, the mob, the herd, whatever you wish to call them -- and if the Jews brought it about, then no nation ever had a more universal mission on earth. The lords are a thing of the past, and the ethics of the common man is completely triumphant. I don't deny that this triumph might be looked upon as a kind of blood poisoning, since it has resulted in a (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Kelley Ross, In Defense of Bramantip.
    In the traditional logic of the syllogism, Aristotelian logic, there are four kinds of syllogisms, Darapti, Felapton, Bramantip, and Fesapo, that are often said to be invalid in modern logic. Elementary logic students may even simply be told that they really are invalid. This is, of course, a distortion; but it is instructive to consider why this has happened and why it is that the syllogisms are considered invalid.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Kelley Ross, Immanuel Kant (1724-1804).
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Kelley Ross, Leonard Nelson (1882-1927).
    Leonard Nelson, described by Karl Popper as an "outstanding personality," produced a great quantity of work (collected in the nine volumes of the Gesammelte Schriften ) in a tragically short life. The quantity and the tragedy may have both happened because Nelson was an insomniac who worked day and night and exhausted himself into a fatal case of pneumonia.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1171